#1
In minor mode this are the chords:

i-ii*-III-iv-v-VI-VII

But shouldn't the III be bIII ? I feel like I've read that somewhere
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#2
Quote by 08L1V10N
In minor mode this are the chords:

i-ii*-III-iv-v-VI-VII

But shouldn't the III be bIII ? I feel like I've read that somewhere
Yes
Theoretically, the chords in a minor scale are: i - iio - bIII - iv - v - bVI - bVII

Practically, the chords in a minor scale are: I - ii or iio - bIII or bIII+ - iv - V - bVI - bVII or viio

You are right in the theoretical sense, the chord should be bIII.
#3
But most songs don't involve Dim chords and such
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#4
Quote by 08L1V10N
But most songs don't involve Dim chords and such
Most contemporary songs, yeah. But than again, most contemporary songs are just I - IV -V progressions.

Jazz and classical songs always use diminished chords to resolve. The best way to resolve from a diminished chord is the use the major or minor chord that's a semitone higher. This resolves particularly well as diminished vii chords contain the same notes that cause dominant V chords to resolve so well to major/minor I/i chords/

You could say the same about augmented chords (the bIII+ is an augmented chord, the plus sign means augmented), but it can actually be used as a good predominant chord, as in a chord you use right before a dominant V chord (which is used right before a I/i chord, aka, resolving).

You could also use that iio chord as a predominant chord. Most guys would use an ii chord (normal minor chord) instead though.