#1
how do you find the notes that make up a chord? my music teacher went over it real quick for our class once but i didnt write it down. =[

i remember that minor chords are: WWHWWWH but thats all i remeber.

ps. if what im saying dont make any sense its because i have taught myself all the music theory i know.
#2
Quote by Fenderhippie69
how do you find the notes that make up a chord? my music teacher went over it real quick for our class once but i didnt write it down. =[

i remember that minor chords are: WWHWWWH but thats all i remeber.

ps. if what im saying dont make any sense its because i have taught myself all the music theory i know.


you're thinking of scales.

go here for what notes chords are made of-

http://www.musictheory.net/

and look at the chord sections of lessons
#4
Quote by toshiro umezewa
you're thinking of scales.

go here for what notes chords are made of-

http://www.musictheory.net/

and look at the chord sections of lessons

Scales and chords are the same thing, just presented differently....it still boils down to notes and intervals.

TS, chords are described in terms of the intervals they cotain in relation to the major scale.

The pattern of intervals for the major scale is WWHWWWH where W is a full step between notes and H is a half step, if you pick a root note and ascend following that pattern you'll get the major scale of that note.

The notes of the scale are referred to as "degrees", and if we put all that together and take C major as an example we get this...

Root note C

following the WWHWWWH pattern gives us the following notes

C D E F G A B

 W  W  H W  W  W  H   <---interval between notes
C  D  E F  G  A  B C  <---note
1  2  3 4  5  6  7 8  <---scale degree


A chord will consist of the root note + other degrees, for example a major chord is the first (root), third and fifth of the major scale, so C major contains the notes C E and G. That applies for any major chord, take the root, third and fifth from the relevant major scale. For variations on chords there's simply different intervals, for example a minor chord contains the root and fifth, but the third is one step lower, which is referred to as a minor third - so for C minor you get the notes C Eb and G.

I've not explained that particularly well, for a better lesson on intervals, scales and chord construction have a read of Josh Urban's Crusade articles in the columns section.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Dec 10, 2008,