#1
Ok so i have been recording music for a while and i try to "Mix" them but it doesnt work out at all and sounds like crap either way. I am using Garageband and plugged up to a little mixer and using Revalver for the amp distortion and my Ibanez Rg7321 and i can never get that studio quality sound it sounds horrible if anyone could help me with this problem it would be much appreciated thanks a bunch. =]
#3
The fact your using a seven string i presume you're doing metal and from expirience you can never really get the "perfect metal tone" unless you mike up a proper "metal" amp such as a peavy or mesa
#4
Unfortunately

Quote by WeAreTheStrange
Garageband and plugged up to a little mixer and using Revalver for the amp distortion and my Ibanez Rg7321


does not necessarily equal

Quote by WeAreTheStrange
studio quality sound


Getting a god basic sound to record is always number one. Some amp sims can work wonders in a good mix but that means you have to know how to mix. Mixing is probably the part of recording that has the longest learning curve, I've been recording for almost 20 years (started out on a cassette porta back in the 80's) and even though I know what I need about recording the actual sounds, when it comes to making them fit together I learn things every single time I finish a full track.
#5
Quote by WeAreTheStrange
Ok so i have been recording music for a while and i try to "Mix" them but it doesnt work out at all and sounds like crap either way. I am using Garageband and plugged up to a little mixer and using Revalver for the amp distortion and my Ibanez Rg7321 and i can never get that studio quality sound it sounds horrible if anyone could help me with this problem it would be much appreciated thanks a bunch. =]

heh, if it were just slapping 3 or 4 tracks together engineers wouldn't be charging the amount they charge to mix/master...the truth of the matter is that you will probably never achieve "studio quality" which what i assume you mean is a pro commercial album

the good news is, you can get pretty damn close, but audio engineers have years of experience. something you will have to start to work on as of now, practical advice is to tell you to go read up on mixing/recording/mastering audio

quick fix advice:
record guitars twice
pan guitars 80% left 80% right (just don't do 100% or center panning)
oops, center soloing guitars
other instruments in center pan (bass, bass drum, lead vocal) spread other instruments out
high pass everything that isn't bass
compress bass & bass drums, add reverb to taste
compress snare & add little reverb
compress, stereo enhance vocals, add little reverb
use EQ & compression to fine-tune

that is the least you will need for a quality sound, it will all come from experience & reading

for tips
http://www.trinitysoundcompany.com/eq.html
http://www.badmuckingfastard.com/sound/slipperman.html#room
http://www.faderwear.com/guides/parallel_compression.shtml
http://www.tweakheadz.com/how_to_process_vocal_tracks.htm

tweakheadz is a great place for beginners
Last edited by DeathDealer at Dec 10, 2008,
#6
Wow thank you guys so much for your responses they help alot. And as for the soundcard question i believe so i record at school and we use macs.
#7
ok to get a good metal tone, i would suggust D.I. ing the guitar and then micing up a sm57 with a good amount of compression and a tad bit of gate to take out the buzz, into a peavey 6505+ and then get a tube condenser and back it up about 5 or 7 feet depending on the acoustics of the room. and thats how most godly metal tones are made. put your direct input into a differnt track so you can make cool effects like the dual delay and stuff like that.
that is what you need to get the godly metal tone
metal is alot more harder to record because of the amount of gain and the whole style overall.
#8
Quote by WeAreTheStrange
Wow thank you guys so much for your responses they help alot. And as for the soundcard question i believe so i record at school and we use macs.


That didn't make any sense.
There is poetry in despair.