#1
Hey all.

I recently bought a mexican strat new. I didn't like using the tremolo at all and stringing with it either. So I tightened the claws down so the bridge lied flat. Now i get fret buzz. I raised the action and that didn't help. To avoid the buzz the strings have to be super high off the fret board. I checked the truss rod but it's right on par. Can you not lay the tremolo down on the strat and not get buzz?

Also when adjusting the truss rod should the turns be consistently as hard? Because eventually it gets pretty hard to turn at one point though the neck isn't straight and I'm still getting the buzz consistently across the board. Starting after the 3-4 fret.
#2
you cant tighten the claw like that. it is yanking the trem beyond where it should be
it should be like - with the body but pulling it will get you \

if you do not want to use the trem block it off. wait for someone to post a pic. i dont have it handy.
#4
Quote by janderson91z
Hey all.

I recently bought a mexican strat new. I didn't like using the tremolo at all and stringing with it either. So I tightened the claws down so the bridge lied flat. Now i get fret buzz. I raised the action and that didn't help. To avoid the buzz the strings have to be super high off the fret board. I checked the truss rod but it's right on par. Can you not lay the tremolo down on the strat and not get buzz?

Also when adjusting the truss rod should the turns be consistently as hard? Because eventually it gets pretty hard to turn at one point though the neck isn't straight and I'm still getting the buzz consistently across the board. Starting after the 3-4 fret.



should the turns on the truss rod be consistent? you shouldnt turn it more than an 8th or a 1/4 of a turn!! why was the trem at any angle other than flat?
#5
The tremolo wasn't flat from the factory. It was risen up a bit.

Well, I went to adjust the truss rod and it was very tight...so i started to loosen it and noticed it got easier to turn. I wasn't sure if it's supposed to be so hard to turn. I've always heard that was bad.
#6
Quote by janderson91z
The tremolo wasn't flat from the factory. It was risen up a bit.

Well, I went to adjust the truss rod and it was very tight...so i started to loosen it and noticed it got easier to turn. I wasn't sure if it's supposed to be so hard to turn. I've always heard that was bad.


how many turns did you get on it?
#8
I'm not entirely sure without having a look at the thing, but I've got a Mexican Strat myself and I've laid the bridge flat without any buzz problems at all. Granted, it's a pretty lazy way to do it and you can put a rather nasty dip in the paint job, so a block is probably a good idea if you don't want to use the vibrato.

However, as I mentioned, I don't think you could get fret buzz issues just by laying the bridge down, and since you said that the buzz only goes away when your action is way high, it sounds more like an issue with the truss rod.

If you're tightening the truss (you mentioned that it's pretty hard to turn the thing) to get a flatter action, you may have gone a tad too far and put a hump in the fingerboard. The best way I can think of to check this is to hold the guitar like you're aiming a gun, with the fingerboard facing outwards, and looking down the neck to see the curvature of it.

On some guitars, you'll want the neck to be perfectly straight all the way up and down, but it's difficult to get right and to be honest it's only a major issue if you spend a lot of time in the higher register and want the action to be really low up there.

On most guitars when you buy them, if you sight down the neck, you'll notice a slight curve around the 7th/8th fret, curving towards the string side, not away from it. This is certainly something you should try and achieve before anything else.

I suggest (very carefully) loosening the truss (lefty loosey, righty tighty!) bit by bit, and tuning up to pitch after each adjustment. You want to be trying a quarter of a turn at the most each time you do this, as the maple your Strat's neck's made out of will not appreciate being bent around this way and that too much!

As far as I can tell you without seeing the guitar, this should get rid of the buzz, in which case you can lower your action again, and if the buzz comes back, loosen the truss again. Keep this up until you're happy with the action and the buzz is gone. Of course there's only so far you can go with some guitars, but you should at least be able to get an action you're happy with.

After all this adjusting, check your intonation, check that the arc on the bridge saddles is concurrent with the arc of the fingerboard, and you should be all set for many years of clean, crisp playing!

All the best!

Nick
#9
good! any more would have been bad. have you read the threads on set up? do you know how to check your intonation? i guarantee with the twisting on the truss rod and screwing in the claw your intonation is out. try resetting it to where everything was. then add a spring to the trem instead of tightening the claw. then adjust intonation by moving the saddles forward (granted everything is back to where it was including truss rod) to adjust intonation. the adjust string height. then re-adjust forward /reverse saddle movement for your final intonation tweeks.
#10
WOW. What a post nickdasbird. I really appreciate the help.

Jymellis, also thanks for the help. Yes I've been reading up a lot. I wanted to take this opportunity to learn on my on but I'm weary of damaging my guitar because it seems like everything I try to work on I end up turning into dust. I may just take it to guitar center eek.
#11
No problem mate, I remember how hard it was to find good advice when I first started messing around with guitars.

The first guitar I ever worked on properly was a Strat, so don't worry too much that you're going to ruin it by experimenting a bit, they can take quite a lot of punishment. Just go easy with everything and think it through before you do anything that involves putting strain on a part of the instrument, especially wooden parts.

A good guitar shop will sort it out whether it's the truss or not, but I always like to do stuff on my own, partly because it's cheaper, but mostly because there's so much more you can learn from doing it yourself.

Jymellis is also totally right in saying that you should add a third spring before you mess around with the claw in the back, which I forgot to mention.

The best of luck mate.