#1
My long term plan, as it relates to music is to become a studio musician. Whats the first steps and advice i will need to know to attain this?
#2
Learn to sight read. Not just know the basics, but have it to the point that if somebody puts a piece of music in front of you, you can nail it on the first take. Also, learn how to play as many styles as possible, and how to get an appropriate tone for all of them. A good option would be to study music in university.
It's a tricky career though. There are tons of trained musicians with university degrees who would love steady studio work, but there really isn't enough to go around. So you should learn to branch out and do other gigs while looking for studio work.
#3
ya im definitely making major strides in my sight reading.

I am probably going to music in university, along with some business studies.
And in response to other gigs.
Yea i know what you mean, stuff like show music, stuff like that?
#4
Yes. Big band charts isn't very common for guitar, but try and get your hands on it. Cabaret styles are big.
Also, make sure you're persistent. I used to work with a lot of 'professional' musicians (guys with university degrees), and was shocked at their total lack of professionalism. They wouldn't return phone calls, wouldn't follow up on important business matters... all kinds of things of that nature. Make sure you have your business in order, are responsive, follow up, return ALL phone calls, and generally keep your head about you. That goes a LONG way in separating yourself from other guys who might be as good (or better) than you.
#5
Honestly, unless you're doing a session for some classical musicians or big band arrangement, I doubt reading is even necessary. If its a musician or two just looking for a drummer or a bass player to lay something down, they would most likely just write the changes out on a piece of paper and have you improvise something. You just have to meet the right people and get contacts.
*Official Deadhead*

The times they are a-changin'
#7
Quote by trey-col89
Honestly, unless you're doing a session for some classical musicians or big band arrangement, I doubt reading is even necessary. If its a musician or two just looking for a drummer or a bass player to lay something down, they would most likely just write the changes out on a piece of paper and have you improvise something. You just have to meet the right people and get contacts.


and if it's slightly more complex than that? just dip out cuz you arn't good enough? miss out on good cash?

seriously dude, sight reading for that kind of work would be indispensable.
Who decided that pie would be sold on Tuesday but not Wednesday?
#8
Quote by trey-col89
Honestly, unless you're doing a session for some classical musicians or big band arrangement, I doubt reading is even necessary. If its a musician or two just looking for a drummer or a bass player to lay something down, they would most likely just write the changes out on a piece of paper and have you improvise something. You just have to meet the right people and get contacts.


Except those are the kinds of gigs that don't pay. Like I said, if you want to be on call by a producer or studio owner (i.e., the guys who sign the cheques), you have to be able to cover any gig reliably, consistently, and quickly. The gigs that pay will never, ever, ever be a couple of guys doing a quick session.
#10
Sure just get you a digital 8 or 16 track recorder. Most studio equipment is available to everyone in their own homes now a days. So learn how to record...
#11
learn music theory and sight reading. don't just half-learn it, really learn it.

buy a metronome and become good friends with it.

learn all kinds of styles and apply them to the guitar

DIY... make some calls and inquiries, be persistent and professional

join cover bands and strange projects so that people who don't know you will think you're incredibly awesome and want to hire you for their project.
#12
You think that bands notate their songs? Doubtful. Most bands wouldn't know how to even if they wanted to. Even bands back in the day didn't notate their songs, they most likely just have some random arranger guy do it later on. Unless you're doing something as part of a classical ensemble or big band, I don't see what situation would call for reading chops. I'm not saying don't learn to read music, it will only help, I just don't think its as important as most people make it out to be. If I was going into a studio to record something with a band and we didn't have a piano player, you think that I'd notate everything out to the piano player? Hell no, I'll give him the changes and let him do what he wants with it. Being able to just come up with something good on the spot is more important to being a session musician than being able to read staff music.
*Official Deadhead*

The times they are a-changin'
#13
Quote by trey-col89
You think that bands notate their songs? Doubtful. Most bands wouldn't know how to even if they wanted to. Even bands back in the day didn't notate their songs, they most likely just have some random arranger guy do it later on. Unless you're doing something as part of a classical ensemble or big band, I don't see what situation would call for reading chops. I'm not saying don't learn to read music, it will only help, I just don't think its as important as most people make it out to be. If I was going into a studio to record something with a band and we didn't have a piano player, you think that I'd notate everything out to the piano player? Hell no, I'll give him the changes and let him do what he wants with it. Being able to just come up with something good on the spot is more important to being a session musician than being able to read staff music.



And this is why you aren't a producer. A producer knows exactly what he wants to hear, and most competent producers can write notation. If you want to make a living as a session player, producers and studio owners are going to be the source of your income, not random bands. Yes, improvisation skills will be important, but the most critical skill for a session player is the ability to do things quickly, reliably and well. Time is money, studio time is expensive, and if you can't do it perfectly on the first take, go home, because the producer is on the phone with some other guy already.
#14
Quote by trey-col89
You think that bands notate their songs? Doubtful. Most bands wouldn't know how to even if they wanted to. Even bands back in the day didn't notate their songs, they most likely just have some random arranger guy do it later on. Unless you're doing something as part of a classical ensemble or big band, I don't see what situation would call for reading chops. I'm not saying don't learn to read music, it will only help, I just don't think its as important as most people make it out to be. If I was going into a studio to record something with a band and we didn't have a piano player, you think that I'd notate everything out to the piano player? Hell no, I'll give him the changes and let him do what he wants with it. Being able to just come up with something good on the spot is more important to being a session musician than being able to read staff music.


This is the exact kind of attitude that will prevent you from ever being a studio musician

The thing to do is be prepared for ANYTHING. That means being able to write, play, and think in any genre at blink of an eye, being able to create any tone imaginable, having a vast array of guitars, amps, pedals, and everything else you can get your hands on.

Be prepared to read music, use advanced technique, etc

In addition to absolute virtuosity, you need to be 100% professional in everything you do

Show up on time (if your on time your late), bring all the gear you need and extra, keep a flexible schedule

Theres more, but those are some starts