#1
Once i have developed a good ear for hearing intervals, the next step for me would be learning how to visualize the intervals on the guitar or knowing where they were. I want to learn to visualize intervals which is like creating a melody or harmony in my head and then having the ability to transfer that musical thought onto the fret board. This would be a neat little improvisational tool!

My question is, does anyone no any exercises that i could adopt to help me achieve this next step in my training (how to learn to visualize/find intervals on the fretboard?
#2
Try to get a feel for how the intervals feel and sound. Noodle around with your eyes closed.
Fifths will come almost instantaneously. You can find the rest in relation to that.

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#3
sing along with what you play when you solo.
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#4
thats basically how I view the fretboard instead of using scale patterns. practice improv slowly and let your E or A ring out and each time you play a note think of the interval in your head.. also working out arpeggios will help because you can instantly see where the chord tones are.
#5
Think about what tones and semitones are and how the strings are related to each other. Don't try this at high speed. You need to, or should strive to, reach a point where you don't think, "That is a fifth, so I should go to the next string two frets higher," but rather just hear the interval in your head and know where the note is on the guitar. To do this, listen to short melodies in your head and play them on your guitar. Figure out the intervals, but eventually move away from relying on knowing the interval and just know where to play the note.
#6
It's more simple then you might think. IT takes alot of practice, but the method is fairly easy.


First check out the interval trainer at "musictheory.net". Then learn how each interval sounds, and do it for at least half an hour every day. Once you can do it perfect (or near perfect, but perfect is always better ) Then it's easy to visualize it on the fretboard.

Why?

Because from every note the interval patterns are the same. The 5th is always at the same spot in relation of the note you are taking the intervallic reference from.

Example:

A|-----7-- = the 5th of the A note
E|-5-----

A|-----3-- = the fifth of the F note
E|-1------

Only past the high b string it is different, but once you can get all the intervalls from reference notes on the low E and A string, it won't take long for ur brain to memorize everything 1 fret higher past the g string.

I highly recommend u first learn it aurally, so you don't learn patterns and that the intervals u choose are based on it's sound rather then on it's name. The patterns are just a way to guide you, and they will fade away once you play enough with them, and you don't need to think about it.

Of course you can do it the other way around, but this is in my opinion the best way.

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#8
Thanks guys, this is all really valuable info for me! It has helped pave my understanding on how to approach this situation.

xxdarrenxx your right! Auralizating before visualization! I have been training my ears about 2 months about 2 hours each day, i will continue doing so then later introduce the fretboard.