#1
something that has always plagued me when learning music theory is something which to me is obvious and i cant help but keep asking the same questions.
what are those "notes" in between notes called?
for example there's sounds in between e and eb, why is this never included in music theory.
it just seem stupid to me.

sorry if this question seem ridiculous to you as my theory knowledge is minimal (grade 3)
any help thanks?
#3
Erm...do you mean eb as in E-flat? It IS included in music theory...it's just the note between the D note and E....E-flat is also equivalent to D-sharp/D#...is that what you were asking about?
#4
Quote by Eat_0n_Kent
something that has always plagued me when learning music theory is something which to me is obvious and i cant help but keep asking the same questions.
what are those "notes" in between notes called?
microtones
Quote by Eat_0n_Kent
for example there's sounds in between e and eb, why is this never included in music theory.
it just seem stupid to me.
they're hard to work with and sound horrible to our western ears. What we percieve as "nice" and "no nice" is completely dependent on the history of our music. We've never used them before so I doubt we'll use them very soon.
It's used in middle-eastern music though.
Quote by Eat_0n_Kent
sorry if this question seem ridiculous to you as my theory knowledge is minimal (grade 3)
any help thanks?
Not ridiculous. It's not something you'll learn unless you go out and learn it yourself.
#5
ah...microtones...

Microtonal music is music using microtones — intervals of less than an equally spaced semitone. Microtonal music can also refer to music which uses intervals not found in the Western system of 12 equal intervals to the octave.

Microtonal music may refer to all music which contains intervals smaller than the conventional contemporary Western semitone. The term implies music containing very small intervals but can include any tuning that differs from the western 12 tone equal temperament. By this definition, the following systems are microtonal: a diatonic scale in any meantone tuning; much Indonesian gamelan music; and Thai, Burmese, and African music which use 7 tones in each (approximate) octave. Hence, the term "microtonal" is used to describe music using intervals not found in 12-tone equal temperament, so these musics, as well as musics using just intonation, meantone temperament, or other alternative tunings may be considered microtonal.
#6
the past (At least) 500+ years of evolution has led us to like the 12 notes we have now. So the notes in between seem out of place for the ear, yet it can be an acquired taste, and can result in a greater listening experience,

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#7
Quote by Tezzquill
...The term implies music containing very small intervals but can include any tuning that differs from the western 12 tone equal temperament. By this definition, the following systems are microtonal: a diatonic scale in any meantone tuning...


Any meantone except 12-tone equal temperament itself.
#8
for example there's sounds in between e and eb, why is this never included in music theory.
it just seem stupid to me.


If you're in the situation where a descriptive system created by and contributed to by the greatest musical minds of the last 600-odd years seems to be stupid, think for a second -

"Am I being stupid, or are 500 years of musical geniuses being stupid?"

Guess. I'm not trying to belittle you, but maintain perspective on these things.

Believe it or not, you can call those sounds "the sounds between E and Eb" or "Ethreequartersb" and so on, or specify those pitches etc. There's plenty of music with those pitches and discribing those in between notes is a doddle.

For example, the "blue note" is a note "between notes" and that's common and accepted.
#9
Indian music mostly. Raga. They use a lot of microtones in their compositions or improvisations. I'm not too familiar with it however. Well our modern day scale is more or less based on the overtone series. The concept of the overtone series was actually devised by the greeks nearly 2500 years ago, more specifically by the Pythagoras school of scholars. Our modern major scale is merely a collection of the first 7 overtone series. Basically Pythagoras took a string, started dividing it into the simple ratios possible and plucked the string and soon discovered the overtone series which the Greeks used in their music and what we'd refer to as the major scale. Of the cause there's more to it, but that's the general idea. And yes, 500 years ago our REnaissance scholars took this same idea and extend the western music scale to include the chromatic notes to create our modern palate of musical tones.

[EDIT] Listen to Strauss's Also Sprach Zarathustra. The first few notes of that composition are the notes of the over tones series. =D

Might I also add, our modern chromatic scale is the result of starting with any tone and adding on top of that tone a perfect fifth. So if we start on C, it'll be, C, G, D, A and so on until believe it or not after 12 notes you return back to C ( well almost ). It's just too beautiful, for the Greeks, and for the followers of the Greeks, the Rennaissance scholars to simply dismiss. 12, such a lovely number. For our western ears this chromatic scale is more than enough for our expressive needs.
Last edited by MisquotedTeabag at Dec 19, 2008,