#1
Well I've been playing for several years. I've learned to play solos but I've never really written anything of my own. So where do I start on writing a solo. I'm in a band now and its a really long solo I need to write. So where do I start. We play thrash metal/death metal stuff whatever. So anyone have any good lessons on these cuz I looked at the lessons on here under solos and improvisation and none of it was really any good.
#2
First find out what scale your in and learn it if you don't know it. Then just play along using random notes after a while you will begin to hear some notes that work good for some parts. Then you expand from there. It's not an easy process but can yield some impressive results.
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#3
Write a lot. You will find something good eventually. After a while, that time it takes to find something good will become shorter. Expect to suck at first.
#4
Yeah the first solo I wrote took about a day to write and it was only 4 bars long. Since then it's gotten easier and easier.

And on another note check out bangood's link out to marty friedman melodic control its pretty good.
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Last edited by Mettliccaa at Dec 12, 2008,
#5
scales that work with genre, learn a thrash metal solo or two, then kinda mix then together, play in a different key, switch the notes around, and that


just practice
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#6
if you can read and write music then do what i do... first i find out all the chords that ill b playing over. then I start to find similarities b/t all the chords (like the same notes that are used). after that i start to write, and as the chord changes, ill land on certain notes that sound good with the chords, and the changes to them as well.

I.E Progression is --> G C D7 Em7 Bb Eb D G

G --> G b D
C --> C e G
D7 --> D f# A C
Em7 --> E g B d
Bb --> Bb d F
Eb --> Eb gb Bb
D --> D f# A
G -->G b D

now as each chord changes find similarities if there is any (I.E same notes in different chords or same notes in different scales of different chords) ... this is getting pretty advanced but in the long run if will drastically improve your playing
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#8
lol i'm not a beginner at playing just writing i can play a lot of solos
#11
you have to understand the riff that you're gonna be filling up with the solo, think of the melody you want to hear and find the right scale to fit for it...
#12
Don't "write" a solo. Improvisation sounds alot better and it's easier in the long run.

Here's a repost on improvising:
First off, improve your phrasing.

Try to phrase yourself like a singer. Think of it as if you're singing with your guitar. Listen to some singing melodies and try to copy it on your guitar.

Next learn 2 or 3 shapes from a pentatonic scale. Try to become good at moving between each shape and try to be able to play 4 or 5 notes on the same string. This will help your phrasing majorly.

When you get good, play over some backing tracks. You should be able to hear the chord progression and hear which notes are stressed (first beat of every bar). On these stressed notes, try to play chord tones of the chord playing.

Also, learn your theory.

You shouldnt be afraid to use other guys licks (like when uncreativity hits), but you shouldn't ever overuse licks. It's unoriginal, cheap and improvisation sounds so much better.

I'll just add, you should be finding things (little ideas and licks) that sound good for the song you're playing over and you should keep refering back to these ideas whenever you solo over that song. It's still improvising, but it's not 'free' improvisation, it's improvising with an idea.
Think about your solo as if it's an essay. Use alot of punctuation (basic phrasing), intelligent words (like diminished runs, chromatics, out of key notes) and refer back to your main idea.
#13
Quote by demonofthenight
Don't "write" a solo. Improvisation sounds alot better and it's easier in the long run.
Don't listen to this! Bad demon!

TS, do what is comfortable. I find that a mix of prewritten material mixed with improv is the best, as it gives some structure to the solo by quoting a vocal melody, something you're unlikely to be able to do on the fly, but it also has that "in the moment" sound when you improvise. Don't decide that you're always going to write or improvise; there's no reason to limit yourself in music.
#14
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Don't listen to this! Bad demon!

TS, do what is comfortable. I find that a mix of prewritten material mixed with improv is the best, as it gives some structure to the solo by quoting a vocal melody, something you're unlikely to be able to do on the fly, but it also has that "in the moment" sound when you improvise. Don't decide that you're always going to write or improvise; there's no reason to limit yourself in music.
Haha, bad Sue for not reading my post.

The bolded parts is pretty much the same as the last paragraph of my post.
#16
What I do is record a rhythm track of the progression I'm going to solo over. Make it 5 minutes long or so, to give yourself plenty of time to develop your ideas.
Use scale tones to create a theme or motif. Once you come up with something you like, think of a way to answer the idea you just played. Soloing is like carrying on a conversation. You're just stringing a bunch of musical ideas together instead of words. You should never play anything, unless it has something to do with your previous statement. Listen to some of your favorite solos. You'll hear what I mean.

Jam with the progression over and over until you're able to develop an entire solo.
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#17
get something like guitar pro, it has a visual fretboard that displays the selected scale all across the fretboard, click on the notes and they will appear on the staff. mess around with note values, bends etc.

lazy mans guide to writing a solo.
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#18
4,6,4,6,4,5,3,5,3 and other math patterns are good.
Last edited by Tempoe at Dec 13, 2008,
#19
Quote by seth's daddy
What I do is record a rhythm track of the progression I'm going to solo over. Make it 5 minutes long or so, to give yourself plenty of time to develop your ideas.
Use scale tones to create a theme or motif. Once you come up with something you like, think of a way to answer the idea you just played. Soloing is like carrying on a conversation. You're just stringing a bunch of musical ideas together instead of words. You should never play anything, unless it has something to do with your previous statement. Listen to some of your favorite solos. You'll hear what I mean.

Jam with the progression over and over until you're able to develop an entire solo.
I like this post. It took me way too long to realise the bolded parts. I second this post.