#1
This may not make sence but it's worth an ask cause I need some simple detail to this.
There's a song that has 2 melodies playing together. The first is a#,b,c,d,e and f. Another meoldy is playing over that with a,a#,c,c#,d,e,f,g#.

The 2nd melody has 8 notes - how is this? And shouldn't these two melodies have the same notes in whatever key scale they're in !
#2
Both melodies are highly chromatic. We can't tell you anything about them unless we know the context in which they're being used.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
Which song? and what's the bass line/chord progression

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#5
Quote by jda12
This may not make sence but it's worth an ask cause I need some simple detail to this.
There's a song that has 2 melodies playing together. The first is a#,b,c,d,e and f. Another meoldy is playing over that with a,a#,c,c#,d,e,f,g#.

The 2nd melody has 8 notes - how is this? And shouldn't these two melodies have the same notes in whatever key scale they're in !
It's called free counterpoint and chromatism. Stuff Bach developed. To use it as effectively as in this song: http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=pYG9fh3dN-Y takes skill and creativity.

It's not uncommon to have that much chromatism and to have two countermelodies resolving on different note. Duke Ellington was another master of really chromatic countermelodies.

BTW, if you want to read more about this, read Kent Kennans "Counterpoint." A few of his chapters are about chromatism. Keep in mind though, this is university grade music theory.