#1
I was wondering how the f*** do you to know the key of a song, how the hell you do it, it it is a chord progression or just a melody, for example which is the key of "House of the rising sun" The Animals, or the key of "Smoke on the water" Deep Purple, I want to know how you do it plz help me.
#2
And Besides which scales can be used for doing improvisations and solos over, the relatives stuff and all of that, sorry for being so picky I just want to learn and I apreciate any help
#3
look up the tabs? find out which scale the notes are in, and theres pretty much a 95% chance that the scale theyre in is also the key. you just gotta now the scales and the notes in it.

also in the future, searchbar? please, its not there for people to make humilliating jokes about.
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#4
You see what scale the notes in the song come from, and those form a key signature. And then you could use that scale for improvising over it.
#5
Alot of the time it will be the chord the song starts or ends on.

Not all the time, but I see it alot.
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#6
take house of the rising sun. What does it start on? If that doesn't work, what does it end on?
If it starts on A, for instance, decide whether the chord sounds happy or sad. If it's happy, Amajor/Cmajor. If it's sad, Aminor. It could be Cmajor because Aminor and Cmajor are the same scale just start and end with different notes. Other scales like this are Eminor and Gmajor.

Whatever. You have your key - Aminor. Find a scale that is in Aminor. I recommend the Aminor pentatonic. Improvise my good man.
#8
Quote by metallinutter
take house of the rising sun. What does it start on? If that doesn't work, what does it end on?
If it starts on A, for instance, decide whether the chord sounds happy or sad. If it's happy, Amajor/Cmajor. If it's sad, Aminor. It could be Cmajor because Aminor and Cmajor are the same scale just start and end with different notes. Other scales like this are Eminor and Gmajor.

Whatever. You have your key - Aminor. Find a scale that is in Aminor. I recommend the Aminor pentatonic. Improvise my good man.


No. The chord a song starts or ends on has nothing to do with the key. Nothing. Nor does whether it is "happy" or "sad" (keys do not have moods). Beyond this, C major and A minor are completely different.

TS: Use the search feature and read the thousands of other threads that have been made on this subject.
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#10
I'm not sure what the answer to your question is, TS. For instance - I began singing in kindergarden, so when I picked up the guitar at age 14, reckognizing pitch was a breeze. Some people have to develop it, and some people are born with it. It's basically the difference between having to learn how to play guitar, and being able to teach yourself.
#11
Quote by Archeo Avis
No. The chord a song starts or ends on has nothing to do with the key. Nothing.

Do you mean an actual chord found in the song, or one that's part of the harmony, and one that may or may not be present in the song? Because if so, then I gotta go and relearn my music theory .

TS, to be completely sure of a key of a song, you have to see what it resolves to.
#13
Right, but what I meant was, even if it doesn't "resolve" conventionally, you should improvise around it or play the scale in your head or something and see what the true resolution is.

If I remember correctly, Steve Vai's For the Love of God ends on the 6th degree of whatever phrygian mode he's playing. So it's not "resolved", but yeah.

I'm assuming this is what Arch was talking about; not everything ends on the tonic chord/note.

I probably didn't explain that well... but I think you know what I mean.

TL;DR, the last chord of a song is misleading and is not always the tonic. If this is the case, one should improvise around the theme/whatever and see what the tonic chord is.
Last edited by one vision at Dec 13, 2008,