#1
i know everyone should get an equal cut but what about the "band fund." should a majority of the show money go to that and then the band divides up the rest or vice a versa?
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#2
how much do you usually make when your band first starts gigging?
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#3
I view a 'band fund' as something that shouldn't be accumulated - there shouldn't be a "band fund" per se. Obviously, money coming in needs to cover expenses like petrol etc, but after that, divide the rest up.
#4
Well, we're making an album. Our total cost will probably end up being about $2500. So what we do is split all of the tips and about 1/3rd of the actual pay between all band members (except the lead singer doesn't pay himself or the bass player, 'cause the bassist is already old and rich. I'm young and starving so I get paid). The rest goes towards financing our album.
#5
if your cutting an album what i would do is discuss with the guys about possibly putting all the money up for the album until you have enough and then splitting it equally after that, if thats not possible then just take a certain percentage that you agree on to go towards the album then split the rest up, thats what i would do ne way
#6
No matter what you do, it needs to be something that everyone in the band is willing to agree to. Otherwise, it will break up your band.

What are your goals for the band? You say to record.... you DO need money to achieve that goal. You either need a band fund, or you'll end up paying out of pocket later. That money out of pocket later will basically mean that you took a loan from the band and then paid it back. Did you really need the band to loan you money until it is time for you to record?

What do people want to get out of the band? If it is money, then people damned well be getting paid, or they'll be gone. If it isn't, then why take anything at all? Why not just re-invest it all in the band?

My personal take on this, and this is what my band does, is that the band is a business. You can NOT take 100% of your GROSS earnings and divvy it up as salary. You can't even do that with 100% of net profits. You HAVE to reinvest. For us, we all have decent jobs and don't rely on the band for money. We used to even pay out of our pocket for rehearsal space before we picked up a guitarist who has a good space at his place. ALL of our gig money and merch/CD sales goes into the band account. We fronted $300 each of our own money to get CDs manufactured. We paid ourselves back. We use band money for things like our banner, our T-shirts, stickers, making tickets and posters, paying the advance fees on renting out a local concert theater, etc. We have enough money in our account now to pay for the manufacturing of our second CD. We dipped in once to pay for an amp repair that occurred when another one of us dropped another guy's amp. The only things we pay for out of our own pockets now is our strings, gear, etc., and any food or whatever that we feel compelled to buy when we play, if it is not given to us. It works really well for us.

We had one guy quit a while back. What about his share of the money? We gave him 25% of the remaining CDs and other merch, and 25% of the cash in the bank. It was a pretty easy solution.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
my band isn't charging for the show we're playing next sunday

100$ for four people to pay to rent out a bar from 9PM-3AM

25$ each... if we get 75 people we get back 50$, if we get 100 people we get all our money back.

We're probably gonna be getting some of our money back + most people we know are gonna come cause money isn't an issue
#9
a bar is charging you to play!? Unless your having a private party or something but I play gigs and bring 150 people with us and the bar now pays us up front, plus our cover charge so we can pull in 800 bucks profit for the band in a night...I would never pay to play, they make a ****load of money off drinks/food, and why no cover? $5 is nothing for someone to get in, but it adds up to a lot for you
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#10
Quote by Swap-Meet
my band isn't charging for the show we're playing next sunday

100$ for four people to pay to rent out a bar from 9PM-3AM

25$ each... if we get 75 people we get back 50$, if we get 100 people we get all our money back.

We're probably gonna be getting some of our money back + most people we know are gonna come cause money isn't an issue



no way in hell i would do this. your doing this bar a service by playing there, your barber doesnt give you money to cut you hair does he? then dont pay the bar for you to play
#11
There are very few instances when pay to play is acceptable and that doesn't sound like one. The only times you should ever even consider paying to play is if:

1. The venue normally isn't open that night and they have to open it just for you, though you'd still get door and merch profits.

2. You can't pull in many people for a renown venue (let me explain this one). There's a venue in my state (Arkansas) that's very well known. They have shows most days of the week. Normally they'd pay you but they have a policy that if you can't bring in about 100 people or more you should just rent to room from them to keep good relations with them. They can book other bands that will make them more money but they want you to get a chance to play. Now, if you bring in a lot of people, you get to keep all the door and merch sales and they'll invite you back without having to rent the room but if you don't deliver, you still get to play and they make their normal profits from a show.

But in this case, you're bringing in more customers than the bar normally gets, they should be paying you, or at least letting you play for free. I'd not play at that bar after this show unless they don't charge you.
#12
Quote by greifvogell
how much does it generally cost to produce a CD?


It cost us about $1000 to *manufactre* 500 copies of our CD. That was bar-coding, shrink wrap, full-colour artwork and disk printing, etc.

As far as how much to produce a CD, here is something I posted in another thread...


Anywhere between $150 and $150 000 or more...


Now, I realize that it sounds like I'm being a smart ass, (and I sort of am with that) but let me explain...

That's a tough question. If you want average 'pro' studio rates, you're looking in the area of $100/hr. This will get you an in-house intern or engineer, and the room. An average 'home' studio won't get you the same results, but it can still turn out quite well, depending on the talent of the person recording, the quality of the room they have, and the quality of the gear they have (in that order.) For this, you're looking at $150-250 for a six to eight hour day. I charge $150 for a six hour block in Ontario, an hour outside of Toronto in a city of about 500 000.

I know some amateur studios that will work for $100-$200 per song.

Nonetheless, it usually comes down to not only the cost per hour, but how many hours. At this point, I always tell clients that it comes down to "how much time do you want to spend sweating over how small a detail?" For our CD, we fussed over pretty much every little thing, and took about 8-9 months from first pressing record to having the manufactured disks in our hands. I have recorded a couple of bands that came in and knocked off 6-8 songs - recorded and mixed - in eight hours. Total cost = $150. They didn't sweat much over some things that really surprised me, and when you scrimp on mixing time, those two things together really show in the final product.

As a general guideline, I tell bands to allow two 6-hour days for a three song demo as a good compromise of time vs. quality.

Of course another factor that determines how quickly or slowly you will work is how prepared you are. No matter how prepared you think you are, you're not that prepared usually. Vocals, harmonies, leads, fills, breaks, intros, outros, etc. all need to be worked out in painful detail beforehand, otherwise, what sounded decent enough in practice doesn't quite cut the mustard once it's put under the microscope... or in front of the microphone. And sometimes even then, recording can reveal some surprises.

At my home studio, 6-8 songs would come out to $600-$800, mixed and mastered. At an average pro studio, for the same amount of time, you'd be looking at about $2400 - $3600.

Now, if you go to an average pro studio and want to bring your own engineer, the studio will not give you a cheaper rate. They'll make sure their staff is there anyways to make sure your so-called engineer isn't going to do anything to jeopardize their assets. So, you'll have to pay your own engineer on top of that price. To get a guy with a track record, you can be paying well into the hundreds of thousands for that person just to show up and take off his jacket.



CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
i'd say put it all in the band fund if you're planning on recording, then after you cover your costs, then split the money amongst members...

the alternative is not to have a band fund and just have everyone pitch in equally for the recording, but some members might not have the cash at the time needed
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#14
does that include distributing, or just producing the disk? or do you still have to sell the disk to stores or whatever after they are made?
#15
No, that's just for recording and manufacturing the disk. Getting it into mainstream record stores like HMV or whatever generally requires at least a distribution deal with a major. They don't do indie releases. I'm pretty sure it has to do with consistency of product across the brand of their store - just like all Old Navy stores carry the same products, whether you're in New York or Seattle.

Getting them into smaller stores is easier, but just requires some legwork. Typically, they will sell on consignment. You give them, say, three CDs, and they'll take something like 20%, or the first $3 or whatever. We sell them in retail stores for $12 and pocket $9 at the end of it. In each case, that's a 25% cut for the store Generally, you have to do the checking in to see if it is selling and if they need any more.

We also sell our CDs at shows, and on line through paypal on our website.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#16
heres what my band does, its pretty effective
any money you make from selling merch, SAVE IT
get a 'band' bank account where 2 members have to be there to withdraw
then any money you make from gigging (say you make 100 bucks at a gig)
take half of it, split it among the band members, take the other half and save it
so if tehres 5 members you each get 10 bucks, and put 50 away for saving