#1
I have a major/minor pentatonic question

below is a standard A minor pent pattern

5-----7
5----6
5----6
5----6
5----6
5-----7
5-----

The way i understand it, to play A major pent you start and resolve on the C


-----7
5----6
5----6
5----6
5----6
5-----7
5-----7


one lesson advises to play A major blues move the standard pent pattern down
so that A on the low e string is played by the baby finger so the pattern to play
becomes

2-----5
2----4
2----4
2----4
2----4
2-----5
2-----5

isnt this the F# pent though?

which one of the explinations on playing the A major pent is correct?
#2
An A major pentatonic scale is the same thing as the F# minor pentatonic scale.

The only difference is the position of the root note. The last...box...you posted is the correct one... if you're playing a 7-string guitar. Maybe. No. Definitely not.

F#m Pent.

2-----5
2-----5
2-----4
2-----4
2-----4
2-----5
Signature? What's a signature?

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#4
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Like all scales, the A major pentatonic spans the entire fretboard.

i know this, but was just using one shape to save time and complexity of the question.

Quote by firebreath07
An A major pentatonic scale is the same thing as the F# minor pentatonic scale.


but lets say you have a standard 12 bar blues in A, or a 12 bar blues in F#. I can use A minor pent and F#minor pent over both these backing tracks yes?
#5
No. If the song is in F#m, you call the scale F#m. If it is in A, you call it A. Position does not matter.

To correct Firebreath, the two scales are NOT the same. They contain the same notes and patterns across the fretboard, yes, but the fact the the root is different makes a huge difference. You don't play the A major pentatonic over an F#m progression; if F# is the root of the chord progression, you call it F#.

If you have a 12-bar blues in A, you can shift between the A major pentatonic and the A minor pentatonic/blues, but don't bring a scale with F# as the root into this. If you have a 12-bar blues in F#, you can shift between the F# major pentatonic and F#m pentatonic/blues, but don't bring a scale with the root as A into this.

Get that idea in your head. It does not matter at all where you play the notes or the order in which you play them; if the chord progression is in A major, you're just not playing anything in F#m. It isn't that you shouldn't; it is simply incorrect to call it F#m.
#6
Ok. im still trying to understand so please grant me patience here.
To keep things simple, I want to stick with using just two boxes.

say we have an A blues backing track playing.

I know i can do a bit of lead over this using the A minor pentatonic,

5-----7
5----6
5----6
5----6
5-----7
5-----

but are you saying i can do lead over this backing track using the F# minor pentatonic, as long as i resolve to the A note:

-----5
2----4
2----4
2----4
2----4
2-----5
2-----5

i dont understand this though as there are notes in one pattern that are not in the other such as C#, F# and B that are in teh F#minor pent pattern that are not in the A minor pent pattern.
#7
Before I say anything else, if you're playing over a Blues in A, you're not using the F#m pentatonic scale. Ever. That scale is simply the A major pentatonic at the second fret.

Anyway, the Blues is a weird genre. Over those 7th chords, you can play a ton of notes. That's why a typical blues solo over a 12-bar Blues in A, where all of the chords are major with dominant 7ths attached, would come from the Am Pentatonic, even though the song is in a major key.

Additionally, the note choice including resolution of your lead doesn't really matter; if the song is in A then you're just not playing an F#m scale.

Please read the theory lesson in my sig.
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Before I say anything else, if you're playing over a Blues in A, you're not using the F#m pentatonic scale. Ever. That scale is simply the A major pentatonic at the second fret.

Anyway, the Blues is a weird genre. Over those 7th chords, you can play a ton of notes. That's why a typical blues solo over a 12-bar Blues in A, where all of the chords are major with dominant 7ths attached, would come from the Am Pentatonic, even though the song is in a major key.

Additionally, the note choice including resolution of your lead doesn't really matter; if the song is in A then you're just not playing an F#m scale.

Please read the theory lesson in my sig.

I don't recognize your without your Elliot avatar.
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Before I say anything else, if you're playing over a Blues in A, you're not using the F#m pentatonic scale. Ever. That scale is simply the A major pentatonic at the second fret.

Anyway, the Blues is a weird genre. Over those 7th chords, you can play a ton of notes. That's why a typical blues solo over a 12-bar Blues in A, where all of the chords are major with dominant 7ths attached, would come from the Am Pentatonic, even though the song is in a major key.

Additionally, the note choice including resolution of your lead doesn't really matter; if the song is in A then you're just not playing an F#m scale.

Please read the theory lesson in my sig.



my understanding would be that Aminor pentatonic would have a relative major, and its basically the same notes, just going from C to C. is this correct?
#10
Quote by JakdOnCrack
I don't recognize your without your Elliot avatar.
Sorry, but I'm trying to be more secretive, more "off the record, on the QT, and very hush hush."

So I'm saying something useful: The interval between the third and dominant seventh in the 7 chord is a tritone, a very dissonant interval. That dissonance allows you to add even more dissonance because the resolution will then be even better sounding. However, the blues is a gritty genre that refuses to release that tension and that creates its cool sound.

Quote by schmintan
my understanding would be that Aminor pentatonic would have a relative major, and its basically the same notes, just going from C to C. is this correct?
You have not said anything incorrect, but there's much more to it than that. The Am and C major pentatonics are not the same and they are not interchangeable. Please read my other posts.