#1
Alright, so I need a little help for my senior project for my high school. I am writing and recording my own music and making an album, which I will burn to a CD, present, etc. Sorry for the long read...

I have acquired plenty of software for doing so. I have Sony ACID Pro 7, the EZDrummer app, Sony Sound Forge 9, AmpliTube 2, and Guitar Rig 3 from a friend who has been into the whole guitar recording deal for quite some time now.

I am facing recording problems with the computers themselves. I have a Dell Inspiron laptop (Stock, about 7 years old) and a Dell Dimension 4700C desktop (Stock as well, roughly 4 years).

I record from my guitar to a Zoom GFX-5 multi-effects pedal, out the headphone jack on the pedal, through a 1/8" cable, and into the mic input located on the PC. I've noticed that it is near impossible to get the tone and sound quality I want through this method, so recently I've taken to experimenting with AmpliTube 2.

I've noticed that the sound quality when using AmpliTube 2 is a little sketchy, most likely because I'm still using the line-in on the back of the PC in conjunction with the GFX-5 (which I put into bypass mode whenever I use Amplitube), and because my computers aren't exactly high-end. I've considered buying the Behringer Guitar Link UCG102, which would allow me to record through USB.

Would this unit eliminate some of the problems I face when recording through the sound card? I'm sure many of you know that CPU usage and sound delay are major problems that I wish to avoid. I mainly use the laptop for the whole ordeal, but Dimension is a little more capable than the laptop due to the fact that it is more recent, so I am willing to switch computers if that would help.

Any suggestions as to what I should do? Suggestions in ANY field of my recording situation would greatly be appreciated, as I am totally new to the experience. Being a teen in the midst of the crappy U.S. economy, money is pretty limited, so ungodly amounts of spending is completely out of the picture.

Thanks!
Last edited by Yomaster at Dec 13, 2008,
#2
Do you have an actual amp? Try to mic your amp through a firewire/usb interface. BTW, add more RAM to your computer to make your programs run faster.
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#4
moved to R&R

also, i use one of these when i record some of the time. i think there is a newer model, but this is the same one i use and i like it. technically its not all i use, as i also run through some other things like a mixer, but it is what gets the sound to my computer. basicly its just a new soundcard for your computer, and even then its not really anything made for recording. however, it beats the hell out of my 4 year old laptop's soundcard (which was pretty damn good when i got it) so it should dominate a soundcard from 7 years ago. you then have options of sticking something like a mic-preamp in front of that and running your guitar or a mic into that. something like a tube mic-pre into that will probably sound a ton better than you are getting now, and still cost under $100. run into amplitube for some effects and possibly poweramp/cabinet modeling and you could have a recorded sound worth the effort.
#5
What you want is a good clean DI'd signal into your computer. What's your budget, and that should dictate the rest. The bad sound quality is from your onboard (motherboard) sound. Plugins won't help you if it's crap in.
Quote by keiron_d
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#7
Quote by drewfromutah
I would honestly spend the extra $100 for a mic. In my experience, micing my amp gets a much, much better tone than going DI.


He has a multi-effects pedal, no amp.
Quote by keiron_d
thank you sooooooo much for the advice Fast_Fingers...i would hug you if i could...i looooove you!


True love exists in UG. Can you feel it?

Recording Guitar Amps 101