#1
Since no one felt kind enough to leave a comment on GFAQs, I'm going to post it here now:

Was going through topics on here and a thought of mine crossed my brain and I was like "o snap *makes a topic*" And that is this:

I sound horrible when I "get into the feeling of the music" but when I'm actually concentrating on what I'm doing and not taking any time into enjoying it, I sound -maybe- 3% better...
So I guess I'm asking - I can't play with feeling without sounding like crap. is this a bad thing?


Hope that made sense o.o Really sleepy right now.
MRavioli: Is Steve Vai still Steve Vai without a massive tremolo backing him up?
Retro Rocker: He could probably think one into existence if he had to.
#3
well, how long have you been playing? Its often hard to play with alot of feeling like the pro's do and get it right and sounding good when you just start off, because your still trying to hit the notes right and remember all the notes.... but if you've been play a while, I dunno maybe you just need to practice to feel and know how to feel... but im no professional so maybe dont listen to me...
#4
If no one commented, no one knew the answer. Don't make two posts asking the same question.

*reported*



Oh yes, because trying to get the answer to a question that I honestly do not have the answer to in a completely different enviroment (website in this case) which I find has a lot more activity is worth reporting -_-

well, how long have you been playing? Its often hard to play with alot of feeling like the pro's do and get it right and sounding good when you just start off, because your still trying to hit the notes right and remember all the notes.... but if you've been play a while, I dunno maybe you just need to practice to feel and know how to feel... but im no professional so maybe dont listen to me...


4.5 or so years now. I do need more practice though.. But it bothers me sometimes that I can't "get with it" and at the same time not suck.
MRavioli: Is Steve Vai still Steve Vai without a massive tremolo backing him up?
Retro Rocker: He could probably think one into existence if he had to.
#5
try different things..
dont worry if it sounds bad
if it sounds bad try something different
just keep searching
Quote by joshjhasarrived
Little does the government suspect that it's funds are being rapidly drained through funding infinite free cardboard boxes to bored teenagers on an internet forum.
#6
Quote by Luthfx

4.5 or so years now. I do need more practice though.. But it bothers me sometimes that I can't "get with it" and at the same time not suck.



im sure every ones been down that road

try not to be shy when playing

if you hit a wrong note dont stop and start over ..just keep going
dont cut your self short because you think you sound really bad other wise how would we progress as musicians or players but im not saying to get cocky either

anyway by doing these things your basically practicing to sound bad

record your self each time you jam go back and listen to what you dont like
then do a take two playing what you think would sound better
listen to that do the same thing

also play with some one who is way better then you
thats like one of the Biggest secrets to learning
after a while of watching and jaming with them you just seem to understand more
watch how they play listen how they approach things
by doing this your gaining alot of experience playing at so called "professional level "
and when i say Professional i dont meaning Burning up the fretboard i mean just being able to play period

when your done jamming ask them questions,talk,have a conversation
doing these things will let you understand them more


some people dont take their time when jamming and they either Blow their trick bag at the first 20 seconds of the the jam or they just over play


take look into Marty Friedman's "Melodic Control"

i would say buy the video but anyway its on google
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=5777562536751428345&ei=Ff1ESfXkLYTs-wGP0oXLDA&q=marty+friedman

very very very very helpful video on playing
this isnt one of those videos where they just show you licks and thats it
this about developing your own phrasing sounding more like a professional
creating originality
#7
I have been there. Many, many times. So when you're into the feeling of the music and going with the flow, you mean you're basically improvising, right? Well, when you are improvising, you aren't making up every note on the fly, you're basically going to a mental library of licks and fragments that your brain re-assembles on the fly.
If your improvising is sounding stale and not pleasing to you, it means your mental lick library has passed it's sell by date, and needs some new material in it.
Things I've found that help with this:
1) Learn some new songs by your favorite artists. Whenever I work on someone else's stuff, I always find there is a bit of a new flavor to my improvising afterwards.
2) Always set aside some completely unstructured time in your practice for just playing around and experimenting with ideas. If you find a little fragment that makes you say "ah-ha this sounds cool!", stop and write it down. This is really important - otherwise that new fragment can get forgotten. Spend time revisiting your written down licks, and messing around with them.
3) Sometimes improvising in a different scale than you are used to can open things up. Suppose you are usually improvising in Em. Well, try D harmonic minor, for example. Just the fact that it's got a different sound, and the fingering might not be as familiar, can open up some new mental pathways.
#8
Quote by Maton+SG
well, how long have you been playing? Its often hard to play with alot of feeling like the pro's do and get it right and sounding good when you just start off, because your still trying to hit the notes right and remember all the notes.... but if you've been play a while, I dunno maybe you just need to practice to feel and know how to feel... but im no professional so maybe dont listen to me...



That sounds like a good answer.