#1
hey rock stars i need your help with The C major scale. im a NewB and i had my first guitar lesson today and my instructor tryed to explain it to me but im just not getting it. i understand that the pattern goes C,D,E,F,G,A,B,C. C being the root note. but if the steps are WWHWWWH. and a W being 2 frets and a H being 1 fret shouldnt it be played all on the 5th string?like this...
5th string-3rd fret,5th fret,7th fret,8th fret,10th fret,12th fret,14th fret,15th fret

when playing the C major scale he has me playing it like this.....
5th string 3rd fret-C
4th string open-D
4th string 2nd fret-E
4th string 3rd fret-F
3rd string open-G
3rd string 2nd fret-A
2nd string open-B
2nd string 1st fret-C
can anyone please explain what the WWHWWWH mean if its not how many frets you move on the same string. what am i not understanding here? is it that the SAME notes can be played on different parts of the fret board like this...
D-4th string open or 5th string 5th fret
E-4th string 2nd fret or 5th string 7th fret
etc,etc,etc
these might seem like stupid questions but if i want to get better i need get this. thank you for your time and knowledge i really appreciate it!!! ROCK ON!!!!
#2
Scales are collections of notes. The "WWHWWWH thing" rfers to the intervals between the notes, not the frets on the guitar. The C major scale (and all other scales) span the entire fretboard.
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#3
You're right to some point.

Guitar isn't like a piano. In piano you have only one key to indicate a single note. But in guitar there are enharmonic notes (notes that sound the same but can be spelt in a different way or can be played in other places on the fret board)

So you can play a scale(a bunch of notes) without moving your hand through a single string.
#4
Quote by YA89
You're right to some point.

Guitar isn't like a piano. In piano you have only one key to indicate a single note. But in guitar there are enharmonic notes (notes that sound the same but can be spelt in a different way or can be played in other places on the fret board)

So you can play a scale(a bunch of notes) without moving your hand through a single string.


There are enharmonic keys on the piano as well.
#5
Quote by blueriver
There are enharmonic keys on the piano as well.


Can you explain? I'm interested.
#6
exactly. and thats the key to becoming a brilliant guitarist. knowing where to play the same note somewhere else. but your guitar teacher is a bit doughy aswell. it's not advisable to play scales using open notes (open stings). i recommend it like this:
5th string: fret 3, fret 5
4th: 2,3,5
3rd: 2,4,5

that is middle C to the C an octave above.

so the WWHWWWH thing works like you said: C,D,E,F,G,A,B,C
you just play them across the fret board instead of up and down it.
#7
Quote by YA89
Can you explain? I'm interested.


Cb is the same key as B

different note.. same pitch
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#8
Quote by victoryaloy
Cb is the same key as B

different note.. same pitch


Seems like you didn't read clearly what I just wrote above.
#9
Quote by YA89
Seems like you didn't read clearly what I just wrote above.


He did. You just described it poorly. Enharmonic describes the property of the note, not the instrument. Those notes exist on any pitched instrument. What you meant to say is that the guitar is capable of playing the same note in different locations on the fretboard.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
Quote by YA89
Seems like you didn't read clearly what I just wrote above.

Enharmonic means two notes that sound the same but have different names and functions.

Victoryaloy was right, a Eb and a D# (for example) on a piano would be enharmonic.

However, an A on the 5th fret on the E string and an A on the open string would not be enharmonic because they are the same note. But a Bbb on the 5th fret and an A on the open string would be enharmonic.
#11
Quote by Ready2Rock
is it that the SAME notes can be played on different parts of the fret board like this...
D-4th string open or 5th string 5th fret
E-4th string 2nd fret or 5th string 7th fret

Exactly. The formula refers to notes and has nothing specifically to do with guitar. It's
easier to see on 1 string as frets, but when you move to another string, you are still
moving up/down the equivalent of X frets depending on tuning.
#12
Quote by Ready2Rock
but if the steps are WWHWWWH. and a W being 2 frets and a H being 1 fret shouldnt it be played all on the 5th string?like this...
5th string-3rd fret,5th fret,7th fret,8th fret,10th fret,12th fret,14th fret,15th fret


You're right, but you're thinking it in different terms. You're thinking of it as played on only one string but spanning more frets, while your instructor is playing it on multiple strings but staying in the same area of the fretboard. Most of the time(99.9%) though, you wont be playing a scale on one string, you'll be spanning multiple strings.
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#13
Quote by nieschizzle
You're right, but you're thinking it in different terms. You're thinking of it as played on only one string but spanning more frets, while your instructor is playing it on multiple strings but staying in the same area of the fretboard. Most of the time(99.9%) though, you wont be playing a scale on one string, you'll be spanning multiple strings.


This

The reason why u have 6 strings is to be able to play chords and because it's impossible to play almost anything cleanly (especially faster stuff). It would also requires so much precision and it would be very tireing and/or uncomfortable and inconvenient to play on 1 string.

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#14
On the Fretboard, notes repeat. You most certainly can play all the notes of C major on any one string, but like others said...Its the scale spread across a few strings to make it easier to play.

Also, Since there is more then just 1 place to play any scale, every C D E F G A and B are useable.
#15
Switchin strings make it easier because lets say you play the B on the E string and you wanted to play a D, you would just play the fifth of the A or an open D string so you don't have to keep moving your fingers lower and lower on one string.
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#16
thank you to each and everyone of you. you have helped me more than you realize!! i finally got the C major scale down. and it makes sense. ALL OF YOU ARE F*CKIN AWESOME!!!! THANKS FOR THE KNOWLEDGE!!!!!