#2
That would be A phrygian.

Edit: Except, it would be written A-Bb-C-D-E-F-G
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#3
Quote by jda12
a,a#,c,d,e,f,g

You must rememba jdason that you nevwa evwa put two of the same notes.
Nevwa. abcdefg correct
aacdhfi not so much
#4
^drunk much? If so I envy you, I could use some just now.
You must have all 7 letters in a diatonic scale. Learn the enharmonic notes. It's a phrygian, ABbCDEFGA
#5
Quote by theacousticpunk
That would be A phrygian.

Edit: Except, it would be written A-Bb-C-D-E-F-G
This isn't wrong, but the scale, without any context, is F major when written properly with Bb instead of A#. Given that he started the scale on A, though, my guess is he stumbled upon some cool notes to add to that 5th-fret Am pentatonic which does allude to A Phrygian.
#6
Cool, thanks guys. On a curious note, what would make a composer write a tune in this scale? - I guess what I'm trying to say is how would they come across this specific type of scale whereas there are 2 other minor scales to work with? Does that make any sense?!
#8
inb4 Archeo saying harmonic minor isn't a scale.

And yeah, pretty much the same goes with "major" scales and modes. If you want a specific feel, use a scale which corresponds to it. Mixolydian, lydian, major, etc, are all simillar but have noticible and characteristic differences.
#9
Quote by one vision
inb4 Archeo saying harmonic minor isn't a scale.

And yeah, pretty much the same goes with "major" scales and modes. If you want a specific feel, use a scale which corresponds to it. Mixolydian, lydian, major, etc, are all simillar but have noticible and characteristic differences.



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On topic; No context is no knowing for sure. If you give us a chord or bassline you want to play it over, we will immediately know for sure

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#11
Quote by jda12
In this case, the notes I was referring to are from Zelda - song of storms. How would you find out this is from the A Phrygian mode?
The piece starts and ends on d, which I would assume the scale should start with the root note(d)?
http://www.vgmusic.com/music/console/nintendo/n64/z64inwml.mid

We said a phrygian because you listed the notes starting with A. When you spell out a scale you always start with the tonic. If F had been the first note in that set we would have said F Major instead.
The only way to know for sure is to examine both the melody and the harmonic progression, but it seems likely that D is in fact the tonic if it starts and ends on D. That would put it in the key of d minor.