Page 2 of 44
#41
^ best thing you can do in the beginning is find what songs you can sing with in the most natural and easiest sense and this will help you determine your most comfortable range. once you find that you can work on expanding your range.
#42
Quote by z4twenny
yes it can, but the idea to that is to not loosen the vocal chords as much as you would while growling/screaming and to emphasize the singing with the diaphragm, this will give you a bit of an edge. Bon Scott actually sings alot looser than steven tyler generally. but again, this is something that practice should help you nail down how you want it to sound.


Ah, so tighten up the scream and sing through my chest? Well, if I can use your recording/tutorial to make a start, then I should be able to experiment. Thanks for the response!
#43
Quote by lcphr3ak
Ah, so tighten up the scream and sing through my chest? Well, if I can use your recording/tutorial to make a start, then I should be able to experiment. Thanks for the response!


Well i have been practicing screaming from the chest, and then the next day i have a heart burn like pain in my chest. why is this?
#45
Quote by lcphr3ak
Ah, so tighten up the scream and sing through my chest? Well, if I can use your recording/tutorial to make a start, then I should be able to experiment. Thanks for the response!


Also, and z4tweny correct me if I'm wrong, but it's important to resonate when you're doing that kind of singing. I normally resonate with my cheek bones when I'm doing a Rise Against type of break up, which I think is similar to what you're going for.

Of course any kind of loud singing needs resonance anyways hah.
We're only strays.
#46
Bass - C below the bottom E string to about C at second string first fret.
Baritone - G on sixth string third fret to about G at first string third fret.
Tenor - about C on fifth string (though often down to the baritone G) third fret to the high C on the first string, eighth fret.
Alto - roughly the same as tenor only in a female voice... a smidge higher...
Mezzo - G open third string to G at first string 15th fret.
Soprano - C on second string first fret to C first string 20th fret.

**all ranges approximate**

For more info on range, check: http://thebelcantotechnique.now-here-this.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=15&Itemid=30

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#47
Quote by lcphr3ak
Ah, so tighten up


These bolded words scare me when people talk about singing.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#48
Quote by QuiteTheFellow
I recently started taking vocal lessons, and after my last lesson on Saturday I felt a very drastic improvement. But now I've been singing so much that my voice has become hoarse and the improvement reversed; how can I make my voice feel good again, or do I just have to wait it out?


There are two possibilities:
1. The things your teacher is teaching you are good. You are doing things properly in your lessons, but when you try to put those things into practice, you do them incorrectly. You've just started. You might not be ready to do this independently yet.
2. The things your teacher is teaching you are bad for your voice and is assisting in you wrecking it.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#49
Quote by z4twenny
thought i'd drop in just to look around and lo' and behold my "how to scream" clip has been totally wh0red out which is awesome! glad to see its still helping people.


I thought I said this in the new updated thread here, but can't seem to find it, so I'll put it here.

That tutorial in your sig is, I believe, the *only* screaming advice I have heard on this forum that hasn't made me fearful of the inevitability of our youth inheriting the world.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#50
Quote by ADireStraight
Thanks a ton, again. I found it surprising that you said I was singing right out of my throat. I compared with some older recordings of mine and I sound MUCH less "breathey" now than I used to, so I assumed that meant I was singing from my throat much less.

I will look into those bel canto technique tips.


No prob. It is my pleasure to share.

The 'breathiness' of a person's voice comes from inadequate breath support. Ironic, I know, but nonetheless....

It's hard to describe exactly what to listen for in a singer singing from their throat, but in general terms, it will be a 'tightness' of sound, as opposed to an openness of sound. Compare Metallica or Soul Asylum (two entirely different vocal sounds, but each having that 'tight' or 'straining' quality to their voice) to Staind or Bruce Dickenson (again, two entirely different vocal sounds, but each having a very open, or natural sound to them.)

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#51
Quote by tobysaurus
aha!
makes sense to me

thank you


NP.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#52
Quote by Kenit

Can anyone suggest easy songs to start with? Preferably ones with which I can also play with (easy chords etc since I am still finding it tough to sing and play at the same time)


Maybe not the style you're looking for exactly, but a few easy ones:
-The Cars
-Tom Petty
-Sublime (what I got)
-Tragically Hip (a lot of it)

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#53
Quote by symba05
Something that usually happens to me and maybe to other people here as well is when I hang out with friends/family and they ask me to play and sing something in the moment, I notice that my voice is rough because I really need to warm up first....

I know it'll sound silly but is there a way that I can prepare my voice or warm up a bit without doing all the weird vocal exercises that everybody will notice and make fun of?


I don't think there is a singer out there who can just fly in and sing their most challenging stuff without a warmup.

If I really want to sing to impress someone, (like Oh Holy Night, which is a terribly hard song to sing) I will rehearse something and warm up beforehand. But I don't do that for an informal gathering where I'm with family and friends are just hanging around and someone says, "hey, sing something." For that situation, I'll pick something easy that doesn't really require a warmup. (like middle-of-the-road classic rock or top-40 tune)

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#54
Is it normal for your voice to get tired? cause my voice starts out fine, but then it gets tired and starts struggling to make out the words. Is there anyway to fix this?
#55
Quick question, not really important....


I'm in no way a singer but when I listen to my favorite music I try to sing with it (like in the shower). Well, some days, after singing along, my voice will lose the low part to it. I can usually hit a low A fine but after singing some times I can only hit a low C (and if I try lower, my voice strains and cracks).

Again, if you have better things to do, it's cool. I'm just curious.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#56
so i was testing my range and I need a bit of clarification. I can comfortably go from the low G on the 6th string to the high Bb on the 6th fret 1rst string. Does this make me a Baritone or Tenor?

Also, would anyone happen to know the vocal ranges of these singers?

Bon Scott - AC/DC
Brad Delp - Boston
Joe Elliot - Def Leppard

Thnx
Last edited by Superstrat101 at Dec 20, 2008,
#57
^I'm no expert but that seems high. Are you sure that's not falsetto?
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#58
Quote by metal4all
Quick question, not really important....


I'm in no way a singer but when I listen to my favorite music I try to sing with it (like in the shower). Well, some days, after singing along, my voice will lose the low part to it. I can usually hit a low A fine but after singing some times I can only hit a low C (and if I try lower, my voice strains and cracks).

Again, if you have better things to do, it's cool. I'm just curious.

It's actually entirely natural. When you sleep, fluid builds up in your vocal chords. When they are swollen like this, you will have a lower range and lose your high notes. As the day goes on they will drain and you may lose your lowest notes, but also gain high notes. For example, in the morning I can hit a low Ab 3 ledger lines below the bass clef easily, but really struggle to get the D above middle C. When I was performing "Messiah" the other night with my school choir, I belted an F for the first time in my entire life. It was because it was around 8:30 and I had been singing for an hour and a half, so I was fully warmed up.

So yes, that's entirely normal to lose your low notes as the day progresses.
#59
Quote by JakdOnCrack
It's actually entirely natural. When you sleep, fluid builds up in your vocal chords. When they are swollen like this, you will have a lower range and lose your high notes. As the day goes on they will drain and you may lose your lowest notes, but also gain high notes. For example, in the morning I can hit a low Ab 3 ledger lines below the bass clef easily, but really struggle to get the D above middle C. When I was performing "Messiah" the other night with my school choir, I belted an F for the first time in my entire life. It was because it was around 8:30 and I had been singing for an hour and a half, so I was fully warmed up.

So yes, that's entirely normal to lose your low notes as the day progresses.
That's pretty cool. Thank you
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#64
Quote by hellforgother
Whats the best way to extend my range?

like, what do I practice?
Sing some scales. The best way I've seen is to sing say a G scale, then a G# scale, then an A scale and so on. Make sure you sing more than just a la or a number.
What I do is this, once through whilst humming, once through with solfege, once through with numbers and than once through with whatever whatever syllables I can think of.

You could also improvise a melody with your guitar and sing along to it with your voice, that's helped me a fair bit.

Also, I think drinking a little bit of oil and then a glass of warm (not hot, not cold) water helps. And don't smoke before you sing, it takes some of the high notes off.
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        L.
#65
Can anyone's head voice be heard when playing along wth an acoustic guitar? When I play and feel that change between chest to head it feels like my voice gets softer and it can't be heard over the guitar. It's strange because anytime I sing a capella it sounds like there's a pretty good consistency when I change from chest to head voice. This brings me to my next question, how do I know if I'm using my head voice or if I just have a strong falsetto?..maybe that's why I can't hear myself too well when I hit those higher notes when playing the acoustic? Help!
#66
Quote by metal4all
^I'm no expert but that seems high. Are you sure that's not falsetto?


Positive I wasn't using falsetto.
#67
Do you guys know ifstuff like this actually works?

My idols are Hetfield and Heafy of, of course, Metallica and Trivium. But has anyone tried one of those vocal improvement dvds and gotten good results?
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#69
It's just something that takes a lot of work and experimenting. You need to be able to be a little vulnerable and feel ridiculous sometimes when trying to get a certain sound.

For a sound like his, look into singing some folk, blues, and gospel music on the side, to work on that kind of timbre.
The medium is the message!
#70
Quote by Superstrat101
so i was testing my range and I need a bit of clarification. I can comfortably go from the low G on the 6th string to the high Bb on the 6th fret 1rst string. Does this make me a Baritone or Tenor?

Also, would anyone happen to know the vocal ranges of these singers?

Bon Scott - AC/DC
Brad Delp - Boston
Joe Elliot - Def Leppard

Thnx

Seems tenorish to me. A baritone should be able to go lower than a G. Depends on your timbre i guess. You're definitely sure that your range is 2 octaves and a bit rather than 1 octave and a bit?
#71
Quote by esp1234
Is it normal for your voice to get tired? cause my voice starts out fine, but then it gets tired and starts struggling to make out the words. Is there anyway to fix this?


It is perfectly normal for an untrained singer's voice to get tired. One of the advantages to learning good vocal technique is that you can sing all night long, and finish the night with a stronger voice than what you started the night with.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#72
Quote by Superstrat101
so i was testing my range and I need a bit of clarification. I can comfortably go from the low G on the 6th string to the high Bb on the 6th fret 1rst string. Does this make me a Baritone or Tenor?


This is exactly my range. Although, I can inconsistently sing a bit lower and in some instances grab the B natural, but for all practical terms, this is exactly it.

A few possible classifications here:
- pop tenor (a male with a voice high enough to sing most pop songs... generally up to the A or Bb-ish)
- lyric baritone (a male voice who can sing operatic material that incorporates and extends the top end of the baritone range)
- choral tenor (most choral stuff doesn't require you to reach the high C that is expected of a true tenor)

Quote by Superstrat101

Also, would anyone happen to know the vocal ranges of these singers?

Bon Scott - AC/DC
Brad Delp - Boston
Joe Elliot - Def Leppard

Thnx


Just guessing from memory here, but....

Bon Scott, I think, tops out around the A before he has to scream to get the note.

Joe Elliot probably tops out around the Bb before going into falsetto. I base this on the song She's Too Tough, which has the B natural, and they got a studio guy to do the vocals on that one. Only reason I can think of is that it was too high for Elliot.

Brad Delp - higher than either of us will ever be able to sing. Although.... he has really developed the transition between his natural voice and his falsetto such that it can be hard to tell where his voice transitions. It might not be as high as I think.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#73
Quote by BrockTandem
Is there anything I can do if my pitch is alright but my tone/timbre just doesn't sound good?


Things like tone are developed through direct instruction and training. There are a few descriptions of proper technique at this site here:

www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Click on the menu item "how it works.'

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#74
Quote by fenderplayer110
Can anyone's head voice be heard when playing along wth an acoustic guitar? When I play and feel that change between chest to head it feels like my voice gets softer and it can't be heard over the guitar. ....


Falsetto, especially in guys, has a very distinct kind of tone. It generally sounds very 'girly.'

Be careful about the terminologies 'head voice' and 'chest voice.' It is an easy trap to fall into, but they are very misleading terms. The suggest that one is used exclusive to the other, which is not the case.

Here is a good article on head, chest voice and falsetto.

http://thebelcantotechnique.now-here-this.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=19&Itemid=30

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#75
Quote by StillSoundRG
Do you guys know ifstuff like this actually works?

My idols are Hetfield and Heafy of, of course, Metallica and Trivium. But has anyone tried one of those vocal improvement dvds and gotten good results?


Hmmm.... I read the link, and was encouraged when I read the part about operatic techniques lasting for centuries because they work. I thought, "ah, good... " (despite the value judgment of 'annoying' but whatevs....) I was glad he mentioned that it takes the same dedication and practice to learn to sing as it does for any other instrument.

However, NO operatic technique will help you sound like Hetfield. He sings from his throat, which no opera singer would *ever* do.

And then I read this bit...

Quote by article


You'll quickly increase the range, power and quality of your voice.


Learning good vocal technique is anything but quick. Anyone who is looking for a quick fix for anything in vocal technique will find themselves hooking up with a variety of snake oil salesmen that promise the quick fix, but snake oil being what it is....

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#76
Quote by hellforgother
Whats the best way to extend my range?

like, what do I practice?


http://thebelcantotechnique.now-here-this.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=18&Itemid=30

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#77
I'm pretty confused. When I use my keyboard to see how high and how low I can go, I can only go from F3 to F5 (that's 1st fret low E to 1st fret high E), but for the most part I can sing along to people like Eric Clayton and Peter Steele. Why is it that when I'm trying to find my range I can't even go as low as most baritones can but I can sing along to bass singers?
#78
^No offense, but maybe you're singing the wrong notes? Or maybe you're harmonizing with them an octave higher?

Does smoking actually lower my voice in the long run?

I'm just a casual smoker, but whenever I'm with my mates I always have at least 2 and I notice I have a deep croaky voice for the next couple of hours, but it *seems to go back to normal.

I sort of want to learn to sing as high as possible so I don't need to buy a baritone guitar or a 7 string. I want a tenor range.

Another question; my natural talking voice range is amazingly good. My voice is deep (not black soul singer deep but edging on that) when I want and high (almost girly) when I'm asking for stuff. How come my singing range is only one and a half (possibly two) octaves?
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[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#79
Quote by demonofthenight
^No offense, but maybe you're singing the wrong notes? Or maybe you're harmonizing with them an octave higher?


None taken, that's something I've been thinking about as well. Unless I've found some way to sing wrong, I don't have anything in the bass range. Hell, I can't even go as low as most baritones when I test my range.
#80
Question here, who knows about speech level singing?
I think its mixing your chest and head voice into one voice. And your voice will not strain when you sing at speech level. My question is does this limit you as to how high you can sing? Any mainstream rock artist use this type of singing? Anything else I should know about speech level singing?
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