Page 3 of 44
#81
Quote by axemanchris
This is exactly my range. Although, I can inconsistently sing a bit lower and in some instances grab the B natural, but for all practical terms, this is exactly it.

CT


that's interesting. lol

I'm not really all that into singing though, the guys in my band want to do an Iron Maiden cover and since I have the highest voice (apparently strongest as well ) they want me to take a crack at singing it.

As for the other vocalists I asked about, that was just incase we decided to do some Def Leppard stuff and the other guys chicken out again .
#82
I'm a guitar player in a metal band but have recently had to adopt the role as singer as well now i've sung before and i usually do alright but its been a while and lately i'll get through 3 maybe 4 songs then i start getting headaches and it'll throb after each verse, am i doing something wrong? , is something wrong with me, no one seems to know , i'm hopefull that the UG community may be able to help ,

thanks.
#83
Quote by I'MNOOPID
I'm a guitar player in a metal band but have recently had to adopt the role as singer as well now i've sung before and i usually do alright but its been a while and lately i'll get through 3 maybe 4 songs then i start getting headaches and it'll throb after each verse, am i doing something wrong? , is something wrong with me, no one seems to know , i'm hopefull that the UG community may be able to help ,

thanks.


You're probly pushing too hard for your body to handle, lighten it up or do a few and rotate singers in your band. That's my excuse when our lead vocalist doesn't show up

Just practice more and you won't get the headaches as often.
#84
Careful there.... if you keep 'practicing' the wrong things, then your voice will only continue to get worse. You are clearly straining too much, and if you are getting those symptoms after only a handful of songs, you will be well on the road to nodes before you know it.

You need to learn proper technique.

Now... speaking of....

Quote by jc71corvette
Question here, who knows about speech level singing?
I think its mixing your chest and head voice into one voice. And your voice will not strain when you sing at speech level. My question is does this limit you as to how high you can sing? Any mainstream rock artist use this type of singing? Anything else I should know about speech level singing?


From the little bit I know about SLS, it sounds like it has a lot in common with Bel Canto. The bit about mixing your chest voice and head voice into one voice, and developing consistency across that range; and not straining sounds a lot like it. Check yourself at www.thebelcantotechnique.com and see. I'm curious as to how the two techniques are different. I'll bet that SLS has nothing to do with the inhalation of the voice, but that's a whole other bag of tricks.

Bel Canto doesn't limit your range whatsoever. If you are singing with proper technique, your range will increase. It will have no choice. When your range is limited, it is because you are doing something to limit it. Remove those barriers with good technique, and you will improve that.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#85
Quote by Superstrat101
that's interesting. lol

I'm not really all that into singing though, the guys in my band want to do an Iron Maiden cover and since I have the highest voice (apparently strongest as well ) they want me to take a crack at singing it.

As for the other vocalists I asked about, that was just incase we decided to do some Def Leppard stuff and the other guys chicken out again .


I'd give Def Leppard a try. Maiden.... I wouldn't touch with a ten foot pole. I love Maiden, but it would kill my voice.

I mean, if you know what your range is, and a song consistently asks you to nail notes three whole frets higher than your highest note on a good day, you're done. It's like asking someone whose maximum bench pressing weight is 200 pounds and giving him 250 pounds and saying, "It's only an extra 50 pounds, why don't you try it?" (erm... because I'll dislocate my elbows, drop the thing, and crush my neck... )

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#86
Quote by axemanchris
I'd give Def Leppard a try. Maiden.... I wouldn't touch with a ten foot pole. I love Maiden, but it would kill my voice.

I mean, if you know what your range is, and a song consistently asks you to nail notes three whole frets higher than your highest note on a good day, you're done. It's like asking someone whose maximum bench pressing weight is 200 pounds and giving him 250 pounds and saying, "It's only an extra 50 pounds, why don't you try it?" (erm... because I'll dislocate my elbows, drop the thing, and crush my neck... )

CT


I like your analogy there. I was a little sketchy on maiden anyway, it's almost like trying to sing Rush stuff... you need to be "that guy". Anyway, yeah thanks for actually responding to me
#88
Any tips for beefing up growled highs? I can do them, but they tend to be airy and raspy, compared to my lows which are pretty booming and heavy.
#89
Quote by demonofthenight
^No offense, but maybe you're singing the wrong notes? Or maybe you're harmonizing with them an octave higher?

Does smoking actually lower my voice in the long run?

I'm just a casual smoker, but whenever I'm with my mates I always have at least 2 and I notice I have a deep croaky voice for the next couple of hours, but it *seems to go back to normal.

I sort of want to learn to sing as high as possible so I don't need to buy a baritone guitar or a 7 string. I want a tenor range.

Another question; my natural talking voice range is amazingly good. My voice is deep (not black soul singer deep but edging on that) when I want and high (almost girly) when I'm asking for stuff. How come my singing range is only one and a half (possibly two) octaves?


have you only recently started singing? it may be that you haven't found your "true" voice yet. When i first started singing i could only sing up to a D# (4th fret B string), singing the E above it seemed impossible. then, after about 1-3 months (no idea actually), i noticed i could sing the E and even up to the G on the first string 3rd fret. Now, i dont really think that i *expanded* my range that much in such a short time. i think i got more comfortable with singing that i found my true singing voice, instead. i just sang and practiced breathing and the next thing i knew i could sing a bit higher (i can go even higher now). so maybe give it some time?
however if that is indeed your range, dont feel bad. most modern pop songs dont go past 1.5 octave in range.
also, smoking does affect your high notes in most cases. but then, again theres guys like paul mccartney who have been smoking for quiet some time and can still sing their high Cs.
#90
What song does McCartney sing a high C in?

I had no idea he could sing that high. (unless you mean in falsetto, which doesn't count)

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#91
Quote by cubs
have you only recently started singing? it may be that you haven't found your "true" voice yet. When i first started singing i could only sing up to a D# (4th fret B string), singing the E above it seemed impossible. then, after about 1-3 months (no idea actually), i noticed i could sing the E and even up to the G on the first string 3rd fret. Now, i dont really think that i *expanded* my range that much in such a short time. i think i got more comfortable with singing that i found my true singing voice, instead. i just sang and practiced breathing and the next thing i knew i could sing a bit higher (i can go even higher now). so maybe give it some time?
however if that is indeed your range, dont feel bad. most modern pop songs dont go past 1.5 octave in range.
also, smoking does affect your high notes in most cases. but then, again theres guys like paul mccartney who have been smoking for quiet some time and can still sing their high Cs.
Yeah I just started. I was hoping I could teach myself to sing. I taught myself guitar, counterpoint and chromatic harmonica (more of a novelty which became serious). All with the help of the internet.
I know what Chris said in on his website and before, that you can't teach yourself how to sing. But I can't afford a singing teacher.

I really want to be a tenor. It's easier to write for imo.

I'll just keep singing my scales, maybe that will help. I'll also reread Chris's bel canto stuff.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#92
Quote by CowboyUp
Any tips for beefing up growled highs? I can do them, but they tend to be airy and raspy, compared to my lows which are pretty booming and heavy.


growled highs? as in like COB kind of stuff? or arch enemy?

try inhaling with your diaphragm but imagine the air staying in a large pocket in your lower back. from here you can do several things. you can do a loud screech (alexi laiho), a very "growly" high (angela glossow), or very easily shred your throat. make sure that the growl is nowhere near your throat. see if you can visualize it going up your neck bone and resonating as if you were belting a high note. if you are looking for more of a scream like phil labonte (all that remains), then try cracking your false cords in a way that feels like the cracking is resonating (and indeed originating) above your nose.

not sure if this helped at all but it was worth a shot.
#93
Quote by axemanchris
What song does McCartney sing a high C in?

I had no idea he could sing that high. (unless you mean in falsetto, which doesn't count)

CT


doesn't he get to that C on helter skelter? also on maybe i'm amazed (not beatles), he seems to go even higher. im not 100% positive that its not in falsetto, however. please confirm either way if you can.
#94
Quote by vocal_johnny
growled highs? as in like COB kind of stuff? or arch enemy?

try inhaling with your diaphragm but imagine the air staying in a large pocket in your lower back. from here you can do several things. you can do a loud screech (alexi laiho), a very "growly" high (angela glossow), or very easily shred your throat. make sure that the growl is nowhere near your throat. see if you can visualize it going up your neck bone and resonating as if you were belting a high note. if you are looking for more of a scream like phil labonte (all that remains), then try cracking your false cords in a way that feels like the cracking is resonating (and indeed originating) above your nose.

not sure if this helped at all but it was worth a shot.


Growling/screaming questions aren't supposed to be asked in here, and if they are, they're not supposed to be answered.

Also, unless I'm sorely mistaken about false cords, the type of scream done by Phil Labonte does not use them. Also, if someone doesn't know how to use false cords, I don't think there's any way to really teach them how. I've been able to use mine my entire life and trying to teach somebody else how to use them would be like describing sight to a blind man.
#95
Hey guys, I'm in a hard rock/metal band, we were a 4 piece band minus a singer, but then the bassist left, so now it's me (rhythm guitar), some guy that plays another guitar, and some tall guy banging on some drums. Our biggest influence is Metallica, so they want to remain a 4 peice band, and want me to be James Hetfield someday...right...anyways I recorded just a very small part to Trivium's Dying In Your Arms song, basically just to see where my VERY limited range is at.

Dying In Your Arms vocal attempt

I'm hoping to take voice lessons very soon, but I'd really appreciate your guys comments and expertise on what I'm doing wrong or right, from what you can tell in this recording.

The actual song is panned 100% left so you can hear the song, but dropped 7 dB, and i'm 100% right, boosted like 1.1 dB, so you can clearly distinguish them.

I know it's not great, or even good, it's basically my first time trying this. But...yeah, please let me know what you think, either in the thread or on my page.
Amps
Mesa Dual Recto 3 Ch
Peavey 6505 Combo

Cab
ENGL E212VH Cab

Guitars
Epi Explorer
Schecter Damien 6
Squier Strat (signed by Rob Zombie!)

Pedals
ISP Decimator
Dunlop Crybaby Original
Boss CE-5 Chorus Ensenble
Boss GE-7 Equalizer
#96
Quote by StillSoundRG

I know it's not great, or even good.


Dude, if you seriously think that you have to boost your self-esteem a bit...I'm not really a Matt Heafy fan but that was an impressive cover! The issues are minor, and if you end up getting that vocal coach they would be easy to fix. As a listener these were a couple of things that caught my attention:

1. It sounded like you had two modes: melodic and harsh vocals, and the difference between them was very clear cut. If you mixed it up a bit and really accentuated some emotional parts over others "and NOW i see it's YOU that's TEARING me...this is me DYING in your arms" etc and introduced some more melody into your harsh bits it would make you sound more in control, and less like your harsh vocals are a speeding train that you just ride from the start of the chorus to the end.

2. Slight pitch wobbles in the melodic singing, sounds again a little like you're unsure of yourself.

Those were just a couple of things that I heard that separated your performance from Heafy's. Fix those up and man you've got a killer vocal track. Well done.
#99
Quote by AmplifySilence
Alright, any tips on creating your own singing style?


Hhhhmmm, well I guess it just depends on what you've been given. Everyone's voice is different in at least some way, but some more than others. Mine has a different sound to it, but I also am making my own style out of incorporating a very wide arrange of sounds. Clean, dirty, low guttural screaming, pitched screaming, "yelling," falsetto - I try to incorporate all of those sounds at least once in all of my songs. In a good way though; in a way that will really enhance the delivery of the lyrics.

So that's how I'm going about creating my own style. But as I said, my cleans do have a different sound to them as well, but nothing I did made that happen. It's just my voice. So I guess that's all I can say about it. Just do your best to bring out whatever it is in your voice, no matter how small, that other people don't have.
We're only strays.
#100
Quote by scream92
How to sing like Tom Delonge (blink182). Please give me some tips!!!


Well obviously you'll have to know how to sing well to get his clear sound. I guess mainly just really really enunciate stuff, you know? He sings every word very clearly so you can hear it. There's not to much help that others can give you if you're trying to emulate another singer. Just listen to him sing a whole lot, sing along, and just try to sound like him. There are more subconscious things that go into singing than there are deliberate manipulations.
We're only strays.
#101
Thank you!!! And how can i get some similar tone? Does singing along to your favourite artists help?
#102
^ his singing is generally pretty nasally (which i can't stand personally) but if you like that sound, then singing through your nasal cavity instead of your throat is what you want to do to sound like that.
#103
Quote by cubs
doesn't he get to that C on helter skelter? also on maybe i'm amazed (not beatles), he seems to go even higher. im not 100% positive that its not in falsetto, however. please confirm either way if you can.


A quick going through each of those songs says that he can scream out a B natural in both of them (but if you can't hit the note without screaming it, it doesn't really count as actually 'hitting the note' IMHO), and then goes into falsetto for the higher notes in Maybe I'm Amazed, where he sings up around the high D and I think the E.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#104
Quote by axemanchris
A quick going through each of those songs says that he can scream out a B natural in both of them (but if you can't hit the note without screaming it, it doesn't really count as actually 'hitting the note' IMHO), and then goes into falsetto for the higher notes in Maybe I'm Amazed, where he sings up around the high D and I think the E.

CT


there's also the part before the outro in you never give me your money, and the better better part on hey jude. though he probably goes into falsetto for the high high parts, as you mentioned. He's often considered a tenor, so shouldnt he be expected to sing that high C?
Last edited by cubs at Dec 23, 2008,
#105
There are different types of tenors. A true operatic tenor, yes, will be able to hit a high C. Much of the repertoire demands it.

A choral tenor is very infrequently expected to go above a high Bb or so, so a choral tenor is defined not quite so stringently... top notes around a Bb or so.

A pop tenor is generally considered a person who tops out around the A, give or take a smidge or so.

It sounds to me that McCartney is somewhere between a pop tenor and a choral tenor. Nonetheless... tenor by most accounts except for the strictest of definitions.

In the operatic world, he would be considered a lyric baritone.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#106
Quote by YetAnotherMuso

Those were just a couple of things that I heard that separated your performance from Heafy's. Fix those up and man you've got a killer vocal track. Well done.

Thank you, I greatly appreciate your very knowledgable feedback.
Amps
Mesa Dual Recto 3 Ch
Peavey 6505 Combo

Cab
ENGL E212VH Cab

Guitars
Epi Explorer
Schecter Damien 6
Squier Strat (signed by Rob Zombie!)

Pedals
ISP Decimator
Dunlop Crybaby Original
Boss CE-5 Chorus Ensenble
Boss GE-7 Equalizer
#107
Quote by StillSoundRG
Thank you, I greatly appreciate your very knowledgable feedback.


Aw shucks. Haha no problems.
#108
Does anybody have any tips on achieving a stronger, more tonal, (better) falsetto sort of sound for a guy? My falsetto sounds far too breathy and weak, and I can't get it to sound much better no matter what else I try.

Strictly for reference, a Matt Bellamy sort of falsetto.

WHAT HAVE YOU DONE
#109
Quote by MusicalMinority
Does anybody have any tips on achieving a stronger, more tonal, (better) falsetto sort of sound for a guy? My falsetto sounds far too breathy and weak, and I can't get it to sound much better no matter what else I try.

Strictly for reference, a Matt Bellamy sort of falsetto.


I don't do too much falsetto, but I know what has helped me the best with it is learning how to resonate it. When I do it the resonance is really strong, and spread throughout my head, but concentrated in my hard palette and cheekbones.

EDIT: Oh and don't forget to keep your soft palette and throat open.
We're only strays.
#110
I think I'm already resonating like mad, but I'll try way doing it. ;D

On another note, I was belting today, to test out my higher range, and finally hit a great-sounding G above middle C. The problem here is that suddenly when I hit that resonant and rich G, my chest hurts. Not my vocal chords, not my throat, but my chest cavity.

Is this something serious I need to look into?

WHAT HAVE YOU DONE
#111
This thread is funny. All these people talking about hitting the "G above middle C" or whatever, and I know it's because I haven't taken theory, or voice lessons, or what not, but I have absolutely no idea what the hell that means, like what middle C is, and such.

Not making fun of anybody but myself.

Not asking for an explanation either, when I finally get into voice lessons, I'm sure we'll cover all that...****in' smart people...
Amps
Mesa Dual Recto 3 Ch
Peavey 6505 Combo

Cab
ENGL E212VH Cab

Guitars
Epi Explorer
Schecter Damien 6
Squier Strat (signed by Rob Zombie!)

Pedals
ISP Decimator
Dunlop Crybaby Original
Boss CE-5 Chorus Ensenble
Boss GE-7 Equalizer
#112
Middle C (written) is played on the fifth string, third fret. Since guitar sounds an octave lower than written (like the tenor voice), the actual pitch of middle C is on the second string first fret.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#113
I posted this question on the second page, but I didn't really get an answer for it. Only one person even noticed it. This was my question:

I'm pretty confused. When I use my keyboard to see how high and how low I can go, I can only go from F3 to F5 (that's 1st fret low E to 1st fret high E), but for the most part I can sing along to people like Eric Clayton and Peter Steele. Why is it that when I'm trying to find my range I can't even go as low as most baritones can but I can sing along to bass singers?

I know I'm not singing in a different octave. I tried singing an octave higher and I could instantly tell that that wasn't was going on.
#114
Quote by axemanchris
Middle C (written) is played on the fifth string, third fret. Since guitar sounds an octave lower than written (like the tenor voice), the actual pitch of middle C is on the second string first fret.

CT

I'm pretty sure I said I didn't ask for an explanation...but your explanation actually helped..lol
Amps
Mesa Dual Recto 3 Ch
Peavey 6505 Combo

Cab
ENGL E212VH Cab

Guitars
Epi Explorer
Schecter Damien 6
Squier Strat (signed by Rob Zombie!)

Pedals
ISP Decimator
Dunlop Crybaby Original
Boss CE-5 Chorus Ensenble
Boss GE-7 Equalizer
#115
Quote by madbasslover
I posted this question on the second page, but I didn't really get an answer for it. Only one person even noticed it. This was my question:


I know I'm not singing in a different octave. I tried singing an octave higher and I could instantly tell that that wasn't was going on.

Well, the only explanation I can think of is that you're not confident of yourself when hitting low notes on your own, so you don't push yourself as much as you can, but when you hear somebody else hitting those notes, you feel confident enough to open up and really sing.

Either that, or you need to check the range of those bass singers, and make sure they're actually bass singers.

Cheers.

WHAT HAVE YOU DONE
#116
Quick question. whenever i sing covers ill be singing the same pitch as on the recording, but my voice still sounds higher than the singer im covering. Why is this and is there any ways to fix it, or make the tone of my voice lower?
#117
Okay, gunsnroses0017, here's the thing- most pitches belong to two 'sets' of ranges.

For example, most people don't have exactly a baritone range- they might be lacking a little in the low end, but sing some low(er) tenor notes, or lack higher baritone, but hit higher bass notes.

If you sound 'higher' singing on the same pitch, that could be because it's at the top of your range, while it's in the middle or near the bottom of the original singer's range.

Seeing that you're a GnR fan, this applies to nearly everybody (male) who tries to sing along with Axl Rose- he has a ridiculously high range (again, for a male), and notes that're high to us sound normal or low with him. Hope that helps.

WHAT HAVE YOU DONE
#118
I want to do vocals like are done most of the time in Anal C u n t mixed with later Electric Wizard.

Seth Putnam's insane screaming mixed with the distortion of some later Electric Wizard.

This: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5eFk5x0o44
Meets: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8AHlL4mPceQ

Problem is I don't know if I'm a very good screamer. What can I use to get some sick vocal distortion? Much appreciated!
Jackson SL1 Soloist / Seymour Duncan Pickups
Shitty Zoom G1 "Effects Pedal"
Shitty Esteban Acoustic Guitar Amp

(hey, makes ends meet until I get more cash. The SL1 was a gift, the other stuff I bought myself, amp before, Zoom after)
#119
First post. There's a link somewhere in there.

Point is, DON'T do it if you don't know what you're doing, or else you're going to end up with nodes (calluses, basically) all over your throat.

And once you get those, you're never going to sing (or in some cases, talk) the way you did again.

EDIT: It makes me crazy nervous, answering all these questions without the help of axemanchris. :stickpoke

WHAT HAVE YOU DONE
Last edited by MusicalMinority at Dec 28, 2008,
#120
Hehe.... keep up the good work. Yer doin' fine.

Just one thing, though.... nodes are more like blisters than callouses.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.