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#1
..like when you put two lighters together. Stupid question, but i'm curious.
Gibson Les Paul Custom
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F/S:
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#2
Fire needs love too.
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LET'S GO BUCKS
#3
Not a stupid question. Not stupid at all.
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#5
because it gets cold and huddles together for warmth.
Quote by Primus2112
I just asked a guestion regarding a music store myth and my thread turns into a discussion about titfucking bagged milk.

#9
Quote by witchhammer
Because fire is cool. duh.


I thought that fire was hot.

Hmm... guess you learn something new every day.
Tonight I kill your fucking face.
I killed your face.


HG FC: 4211 7971 0287
Plt FC: 3052 1000 9033
#10
Better yet: Why do the drops of water on a windshield join together as they slide down?
#12
Quote by Mudmen190
Better yet: Why do the drops of water on a windshield join together as they slide down?

Its called adhesion.....

Water molecuels are polar and like to stick to other water molecules. The O's bond with the H's.
#13
sigh its impossible for anyone to get answers in the pit. I'll tell you dude its the elements in the one fire links up with the other fire
#16
Quote by aaronob
The O's bond with the H's.


OOOOOOHHHHHH YEAAAAAAH.

(bad joke )
Tonight I kill your fucking face.
I killed your face.


HG FC: 4211 7971 0287
Plt FC: 3052 1000 9033
#17
Quote by dethead666
sigh its impossible for anyone to get answers in the pit. I'll tell you dude its the elements in the one fire links up with the other fire



jesus ****balls how did you know that?
Soon you will sit on the bench
of those who deny I have my soul
You sell a dream you create
Condemned by what you condemned before
Smooth are the words you sing down and high
Underground is your joy your laws
#18
Quote by Mudmen190

Dont be mad, thank me for inserting knowledge into your brain so next time youre in a car and its rainging, you can inform all of your friends about adhesion and they will all think youre the coolest friend ever. And if theyre chicks theyll want to hook up with you.
#19
Quote by Mudmen190
Better yet: Why do the drops of water on a windshield join together as they slide down?


hydrogen bonding

look it up.
Quote by C O B H C
If you want to get really technical about it..

1. Grab sticks.
2. Bang sticks on drums.


^how to play drums.


UG POKER
#20
Quote by dethead666
sigh its impossible for anyone to get answers in the pit. I'll tell you dude its the elements in the one fire links up with the other fire


Was that supposed to be an answer or a joke? Both were noneffective sadly.
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LET'S GO BUCKS
#21
because the oxygen between the flames erupts with the heat. Oxygen makes fire burn, and so oxygen between fire? more fire. Its like putting packman pellets between two pac men.
i enjoy head
#22
Quote by Jazzcore23
because the oxygen between the flames erupts with the heat. Oxygen makes fire burn, and so oxygen between fire? more fire. Its like putting packman pellets between two pac men.


lol. Great comparison.

This man speaks truth.
Quote by C O B H C
If you want to get really technical about it..

1. Grab sticks.
2. Bang sticks on drums.


^how to play drums.


UG POKER
#23
why yes, it WAS john petrucci
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#24
Fire probably joins together due to the simple fact that the heat causes the air to become more mobile, decreasing its density. The air I would theorize creates a void similar to a light vacuum in comparison to the rest of the air around it. This essentially sucks the flames together... I took Heat and Mass Transfer class as well as Fluid Dynamics, and this seems like a reasonable GUESS. Bear that in mind.
#25
Quote by AeroRocker
Was that supposed to be an answer or a joke? Both were noneffective sadly.

1st one was a joke and lets just say my ipc teacher sucks ass so its not all my fault
#28
Because of convection. The air in between the two flames heats up more than the surrounding air so the pressure between the two flames drops, drawing them together.
#29
Because they're the same element. It's like asking why water 'joins' when you pour a cup of water into the ocean.
#30
Quote by 'Leviathan'
Because they're the same element. It's like asking why water 'joins' when you pour a cup of water into the ocean.

Element? You seriously believe that there are only four elements that everything in the universe is composed of (earth water air fire)?
#31
Quote by AzureNight
Element? You seriously believe that there are only four elements that everything in the universe is composed of (earth water air fire)?


you forgot heart

CAPTAIN PLANET!!!
The best thing about life is knowing you put it together
#32
I can't remember what it's specifically called, I haven't done science since year 9.
It's where substances and materials keep to their own. Ever noticed when you pour a glass of water out, it sticks to the side of the glass, even if it defys gravity? It's something to do with that.
Quote by IROBOTInferno
I've never been caught (beating off), but my dad was picking up my gf once and "accidentaly" grabbed her boobs.
#33
Quote by smb
Because of convection. The air in between the two flames heats up more than the surrounding air so the pressure between the two flames drops, drawing them together.


this
#35
Quote by 'Leviathan'
Because they're the same element. It's like asking why water 'joins' when you pour a cup of water into the ocean.

lol fire element lol

I know what you mean though.
I can honestly say I have really been far even as decided to use even go want to do look more like.


I don't always post on UG, but when I do, I post in the Pit. Stay thirsty my friends.
#36
even better question... someone explains to me why fire is colored. is heat directly related to color? or does something being really hot screw with the light waves, thus causing different colors (orange, yellow, blue)? I never understood that. also the process of something burning intrigues me, like wood changing to ash, what's up with that? could someone explain?
#37
Quote by AcousticSlayer
I'm gonna say because the butane in the two lighters combine in the same flame.


That's what I was thinking...
Quote by bendystraw
what's pron?


EDIT: i googled it, you guys are gross.


a2m/gape/murder/suicide/farrakhan/braziliancakefarts/bugera
#38
Quote by The4thHorsemen
even better question... someone explains to me why fire is colored. is heat directly related to color? or does something being really hot screw with the light waves, thus causing different colors (orange, yellow, blue)? I never understood that. also the process of something burning intrigues me, like wood changing to ash, what's up with that? could someone explain?

The hotter something burns is related to its color, but that doesn't mean that say a green shirt will be hotter/cooler than a yellow shirt and vice versa. When studying astronomy on the HR diagram stars are classified according to temperature and luminosity. The categories from hottest to coolest are O, B, A, F,G, K, M.

The bottom bar is what color a star will appear at a given temperature and luminosity, so color is related to temperature in a sense.

#40
Quote by The4thHorsemen
even better question... someone explains to me why fire is colored. is heat directly related to color? or does something being really hot screw with the light waves, thus causing different colors (orange, yellow, blue)? I never understood that. also the process of something burning intrigues me, like wood changing to ash, what's up with that? could someone explain?


Heat is related to the wavelength of a color. The less hot, the longer the wavelength, the less energy. The hotter, the shorter the wavelength, the more energy.

If you look at a flame, you'll notice that the innermost color is blue. The blue portion is the hottest part of the flame. Why? Because it has the highest amount of heat-energy, it has a short wavelength. This short wavelength results in the color blue. The farther out to the tip you get, there are different amounts of heat-energy, so different wavelengths, so different colors.
"Let's not be too rough on our own ignorance. I mean, after all, it's the thing that makes America great." - Frank Zappa while on the Arsenio Hall Show

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