#1
when i pick fast i tend to put tension on my whole arm and chest.
after 1 hour of playing fast stuff it starts to hurt. i try not to do it but i cant help it.
does anyone know something that helps?
#2
try to differ ur playing position a bit, between standing and sitting and give it some time in the oven
break on through
Last edited by stigmeister2win at Dec 15, 2008,
#5
just practice, both guitar and maybe weights, push ups, sports, any physical exercise that gets you more stamina n strength. Also practice playing lightly by going real slow and gentle, and barely moving, speed it up slowly (not in a few days, in weeks probably) until you can play fast again, and then when you want to really go fast you tense up, and i guess it'll be hell fast, but i dunno coz im still trying to play lighter as well.
#6
Quote by tom1thomas1
just practice, both guitar and maybe weights, push ups, sports, any physical exercise that gets you more stamina n strength. Also practice playing lightly by going real slow and gentle, and barely moving, speed it up slowly (not in a few days, in weeks probably) until you can play fast again, and then when you want to really go fast you tense up, and i guess it'll be hell fast, but i dunno coz im still trying to play lighter as well.


Fast alternate picking does not require any considerable strength in the arm at all, and in no circumstances is playing tense ever ideal.

Removing tension in the arm is easy if you're a tense player, minimising it can be quite difficult. The first step is to let you're arm fall loosely to your side. For most people, the thumb will be touching the index finger in some way. This is the most natural position you can hold you hand in while you pick, so slip between your index finger and thumb. When you pick, hold the pick only as tightly as is necessary, and keep the other fingers of your picking hand loose.

Pick with a wrist motion, and use your elbow only to facilitate string changes. Start very slow, and as you gradually increase speed over time, always try to remain as loose as possible.

If you anchor, you should really stop. Applying pressure into the guitar to create a pivot point or to steady your hand will inhibit development of the muscles you should be using while picking. Lightly touching to mute string noise is crucial of course, but heavily anchoring is another story altogether.

And please, don't debate the anchoring thing. I know alot of very good players that anchor (Steve Morse, John Petrucci), but look at pickers like Shawn Lane and Paul Gilbert, and how much more effortless their picking is. You're picking will develop better if you don't anchor.
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#7
thanks prophet
i hold my pick with my thumb index and middle finger is that a problem ?
#8
...how do you hold a pick in three fingers? Must be some large pick.

But. Yeah. You pick with the wrist not the arm. However if you're not anchoring your arm on the guitar your shoulder may become tired

edit: by the way, to dispute Page's Prophet's post a little - your remaining fingers don't have to be loose, they can also be folded inwards as if half a fist. Whatever you like

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Last edited by bornfidelity at Dec 15, 2008,
#9
Quote by bornfidelity
...how do you hold a pick in three fingers? Must be some large pick.


I don't recommend holding the pick with the thumb and two fingers, mostly because it limits what else you can do with your picking hand. Hybrid picking for example.

Quote by bornfidelity
But. Yeah. You pick with the wrist not the arm. However if you're not anchoring your arm on the guitar your shoulder may become tired


Wrong. Anchoring will increase fatigue. Actively applying pressure into the guitar (to create a pivot point or to "steady" the hand) requires exertion, exertion makes you tire. The effort required to keep your and floating is far less.

A man who doesn't look like he's getting tired...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlnIiM4Wbi0
Look how completely free and effortless his picking is. Hand floating freely.

Look an awful lot more comfortable to me than videos of anchoring players like Steve Morse and John Petrucci.

By the way, while anchoring does steady the hand, it's a crutch. It's far more beneficial to your technique to practice unanchhored and developed the muscle control in your arm. Anchoring fugely limits your range of motion

Quote by bornfidelity
edit: by the way, to dispute Page's Prophet's post a little - your remaining fingers don't have to be loose, they can also be folded inwards as if half a fist. Whatever you like


Loose fingers are naturally roughly half curled?

And no, it's not "whatever you like." There are some habits you can develop which are comfortable to begin with, but hugely inhibit your playing.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#10
Read some of freepower's articles in his profile or the stickies in the Advanced techniques section of the forum.

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#11
Quote by dynamitri
thanks prophet
i hold my pick with my thumb index and middle finger is that a problem ?

I held my pick like that for 20 years and then switched to the regular thumb and forefinger, made a little bit of difference but nothing major but I would switch now before you leave it too long, it feels uncomfortable at first but it can be done. Paul Gilbert used to pick the same way and switched after 9 years.

I wrote an article on how I made the change:

http://www.guitarnoize.com/blog/comments/20-years-later-and-back-to-square-one/
#12
I believe truly proper picking is actually just the thumb and forefinger motion, no wrist or arm movement at all. That's what I've been taught by every highly trained classical guitarist I've ever met and I trust those ****ers.
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