#1
So I was reading an article on EVH yesterday and he went into some detail about how he modified his bridge/strings so they wouldn't go out of tune when did all those dive bombs on his standard Fender trem. He said he turns the string at the ball end where it enters the bridge everytime he tightens it on the peg, and he wound the strings up the tuning peg instead of down. I've heard that he boils his strings too.

I was just wondering if anyone knows the right way to the this (the first two), or if anyone knows other tricks that'll help me get more life out of my strings
#2
he BOILS his strings? never heard of that.... but by golly it might do the trick lol ESPECIALLY if you has corrosive strings. corrosive just means they are sexy : )
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#3
I've heard of the boiling the strings trick many times; mostly by bass players though.
The other two, really no clue.

Learning to put strings on a guitar properly takes a little more skill than most people think. The amount of guitarists I've seen that break strings constantly from not putting them on quite right is astounding.
#4
make sure to stretch them after you put them on. thats my only trick i guess lol.
#5
I like to give them a good stretchin when tuning and retune again. After a few times no need to retune and that's how they stay.
#6
From what I remember, boiling the strings stretches them so you don't have to wait for them to do it naturally on the guitar. The corrosion didn't matter to EVH because he used a new set of strings every night or close to it.

No idea about the others though.
#7
Quote by ChrisN
I've heard of the boiling the strings trick many times; mostly by bass players though.
The other two, really no clue.

Learning to put strings on a guitar properly takes a little more skill than most people think. The amount of guitarists I've seen that break strings constantly from not putting them on quite right is astounding.


+1 to putting strings the right way
also boilin strings is in fact true, it makes you strings play and sound like new again for a couple of days, not a big deal when a strings set cost 5$ but when they cost 35$ it can be quite usefull
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#8
Quote by austinb0309
So I was reading an article on EVH yesterday and he went into some detail about how he modified his bridge/strings so they wouldn't go out of tune when did all those dive bombs on his standard Fender trem. He said he turns the string at the ball end where it enters the bridge everytime he tightens it on the peg, and he wound the strings up the tuning peg instead of down. I've heard that he boils his strings too.

I was just wondering if anyone knows the right way to the this (the first two), or if anyone knows other tricks that'll help me get more life out of my strings


It won't stop them going out of tune and it won't make new strings last any longer. Players used to boil old strings years ago to try and get a bit more life out of them because strings were hard to get hold of and expensive.

That's not the case any more so there's no reason to even consider doing it - you can get a pack of strings for a fiver and there's guitar shops everywhere.
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#9
Quote by ChrisN
Learning to put strings on a guitar properly takes a little more skill than most people think. The amount of guitarists I've seen that break strings constantly from not putting them on quite right is astounding.



What do they usually do wrong?


.
#10
Some things I've seen far too often:

Wrapping the string/s round the capstan the wrong way. Worse on a 3-a-side headstock; they'll wrap them all clockwise or all anti-clockwise making 3 right and 3 wrong.

Not getting at least 2 turns around the capstan (1 above, 1 below) so the string slips out of tune more easily.

Even if they do get 2+ wraps, not having one above and below.

Taking all the strings off first and then putting the new ones on.
Last edited by ChrisN at Dec 15, 2008,
#11
Quote by ChrisN
Taking all the strings off first and then putting the new ones on.


Oh my God, how many people believe this crap? I'm fed up with telling people.

IT IS ABSOLUTELY FINE TO TAKE ALL THE STRINGS OFF YOUR GUITAR FOR A SHORT AMOUNT OF TIME.


How else are you going to clean your fretboard?
#12
Quite easily, thanks.

If you feel fine taking them all off then ok.
The stress of the truss rod on the neck is quite substantial; even just a half turn to tighten it (by someone who doesn't know what they're doing) can break a neck.

Fair enough, it's not going to cause a vast amount of damage for a short time, but what... once a month over a number of years (depending how often you change your strings), can't exactly be the best for it.
#13
I have to agree with UncleCthulhu, I really doubt loss of tension for 10-15 minutes once a month would do any harm. Even the pro guitar techs usually take off all the strings at once, at least any ive seen as it makes the whole job a lot quicker.

And it is the only decent way of cleaning and oiling a fretboard, string by string would take forever and prob end up missing a few areas as well.
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#14
Quote by UncleCthulhu
Oh my God, how many people believe this crap? I'm fed up with telling people.

IT IS ABSOLUTELY FINE TO TAKE ALL THE STRINGS OFF YOUR GUITAR FOR A SHORT AMOUNT OF TIME.

How else are you going to clean your fretboard?


+1

Consider a trem, when you do a full dive your neck doesn't spontaneously explode does it? When necks are being manufactured, they don't get made with strings on do they?

Boiling strings isn't a good idea, they rust. Soaking them in methylated spirits works a lot better.
#15
Quote by thedonutman
Boiling strings isn't a good idea, they rust. Soaking them in methylated spirits works a lot better.

That's true, but as Steven_Seagull already pointed out, it's kinda pointless nowadays.

My advice about restringing guitars: Most guitars come with a manual. Do what's written in there.
#16
I saw a diagram last week in GG&A, showing a way of flipping the end of the string up after the first coil of the capstan, then wrapping the rest over that. Would that work? Anyone have that diagram?
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#17
at first i was skeptical because I never heard of doing this, but this technique has really helped my strat with a normal trem set to float stay in tune with stock non locking squier tuners
#18
I second the notion regarding the "all strings at once..." it won't FUBAR your neck by any means. This primarily applies to Floyd Rose trems because people that have no clue about simple mechanics do not realize how to easily fix a sunken Floyd -_-.
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#19
^Yeah, that one.
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#20
Quote by ChrisN


Even if they do get 2+ wraps, not having one above and below.

.


Two to three wraps, simply 'below', spiralling downwards, nothing wrong with that.
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