#1
First post on UG, altough I'vve been looking trough The Pit for quite a While now


Here's the problem: I've been playing guitar for about 6 months now and I would like to know what should you learn in theory first. I already know all my notes, what's next?
#3
Scales! Theres a slight chance you already know them, as they techically just are notes. If you do, you should check out modes.
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#5
okay here's how i learned the major n minor scales.


on any string, the Major Scale [Ionian Mode] is: 0,2,4,5,7,9,11,12 (that's the octave)
so playing those notes on the E string would produce and E Major Scale, on the G string would be a G Major, etc....

the Minor Scale [Aeolian Mode] would be: 0,2,3,5,7,8,10,12. only 3 notes change. the 3rd, 6th, and 7th notes.

the next logical step would be to arrange them into "boxes". shreders usually go for 3 notes per string (3nps).


now try this: play the E Minor, and say each note name. then play G Major and say each note name. Notice anything? you have just stumbled upon modes.....
#6
^No, he stumbled upon the relative major.

If you're playing D E F G A B C D over C Major, it's still C Major.

Also, this is subjective, but learning the notes of the fretboard fluently is much more efficient than learning box patterns.
#7
Quote by one vision
^No, he stumbled upon the relative major.

If you're playing D E F G A B C D over C Major, it's still C Major.

Also, this is subjective, but learning the notes of the fretboard fluently is much more efficient than learning box patterns.



the relative min/maj IS modal. it;s like STEP 1, but why not start there and THEN go into Lydian, Mixo, Dorian, and Phrygian?

and boxes are a GREAT way to reinforce theory.
#8
Quote by k3v1n shr3dz
the relative min/maj IS modal. it;s like STEP 1, but why not start there and THEN go into Lydian, Mixo, Dorian, and Phrygian?

and boxes are a GREAT way to reinforce theory.


Ts has been playing for 6 months. Modes are way too advanced to dig into them.

TS start with the crusade articles, and learn diatonic chord progressions and the major scale.

Also, what kind of music do you want to play/learn?

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#9
I love anything from Dream Theater to Megadeth to Guns N' Roses..If that can help. Also, where can I find this Crusade article?
#11
Quote by k3v1n shr3dz
the relative min/maj IS modal. it;s like STEP 1, but why not start there and THEN go into Lydian, Mixo, Dorian, and Phrygian?

and boxes are a GREAT way to reinforce theory.

Theres a difference between playing Aeolian and playing "minor".
#13
1. Major Scale construction
2. Interval names
3. Major, Minor and diminished chord construction
4. Arpeggios of above formulas on strings in multiple octaves
5. Modes and mMd value of each
6. Minor to Major movement AKA blues
7. Pentatonics/Pentatonic Blues Scales
#14
^ Interval names first, and please, please, theory isn't about memorizing, it's about listening. Theory is NOT about naming or knowing on a fretboard a certain chord, interval or scale it's about knowing how they sound. Do not make the mistake of trying to learn shapes on the fretboard that are named certain intervals, learn how they sound and then figure out what they sound like on the fretboard. Go with intervals first, and then after you know 'em all, fool around with different combinations of intervals, always aware of what they WILL sound like; to the best of your ability. And if you're lucky within a day or two you'd have come up with a scale on your own that'd probably be called a major scale. Learn the intervals of all the scales and then move onto chords and then modes.

And btw, while you're learning all this, learn the pentatonic scale and have some serious fun with it.
#15
My order is:

1. Blues scale so you can show off to your friends and have some fun
2. Major scale and diatonic harmony
3. Minor scale and the V7 chord
4. Harmonic and melodic minor
5. Modes of the major scale
6. Modes of the melodic and harmonic minor scales
7. Weird stuff...anything at this point, really, as you know all the fundamentals by now

The theory link in my sig essentially follows this pattern. I suggest reading it.
#16
Quote by one vision
^Modes are way too advanced for now. Learn the major scale and how it works, the harmony behind it, etc. Learn chord consctruction from scales, etc.


Ive only been playing 8 months, and I have a pretty good understanding of modes. Jumping into theory so soon was the best thing that could have happened for my playing. I'd say start now on theory and if you get confused, just ask questions. some people can be a**holes about it, but usually they're only trying to help.