#1
Well pit, its come to this

i have a history exam on the Cold war and Britain during the cold war, its actually a GCSE mock and i've had leukemia for over a year and i've only just started going to school after recovering

anyway, i've revised all the topics like mad, but i have no idea on how to ANSWER the questions, theres almost a style to each question

before you say anything, i HAVE tried using gogle but i couldnt find anything useful, i was just wondering if any of you had past questions with modal answers so i can nail the technique for tomorrows mock

thanks in advance, any help will be appreciated
#2
The usual essay thing really, point, example explain. Make a point, then back it up with evidence or whatever (not always possible, mainly with figures and stats) then explain that point. I know it's not much help, its just that I dunno what type of questions you have, Im probably on a different exam board to boot.
#3
you know what's sadistic?

"leuk" means "fun" in dutch, so leukemia could be a referral to funemia...

sorry, can't help you!
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#4
Your teachers surely don't expect you to know the course inside-out after a year off school!? Ask your teacher to show you how to write it?
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#5
Take the point, evidence, explanation advice /\

On source based questions you need to think bout thinks like: Why they were written, who by and when (considering that people who write after an event have an advantage of hindsight) and the kind of language used etc.

If the question is about usefulness remember to bring in bias and how trusted the writer was. Also remember that every source has it's use but you need to assess the extent of this usefulness.

Mainly just remember that it is just a Mock Exam, you will have time to learn before the real thing. Good Luck.
Last edited by aaciseric at Dec 15, 2008,
#6
Depends how many marks each question is worth, I assume you are talking about a test paper with sources rather than an essay question. For each question you should ask yourself what each source shows and how it relates to the question, and don't forget to cross-reference sources if you are aiming for A/A*.

For example, if I had a source (for this, source C) which shows a picture Alexander Fleming, in his lab, on a stain glass window, and a question worth 7 marks which said, "How does source C show Alexander Flemings importance to medicine?" Then I would also look at the other sources which mentioned Fleming and compare them to that source.

You should write something like this... "Source C shows Alexander Fleming's importance to medicine because.... this was because.... Source D agrees with this because.... However, source A and B contradict this because....

Basically, GCSE's are about relaying information and relating it back to the question, you don't really need much knowledge with source-based papers, you just need to know how to give the examiners what they are looking for. With history papers, it's all about cross-referencing. Cross referencing will always automatically put you in the top band of marks, simply for mentioning and comparing another source you will almost always be given at least 75% of the available marks - and don't forget to always explain your points.
#8
Here's your answer: 'The cold war was long and pointless. Like my penis. Which you can have access to in exchange for an A.'

Hell, that got me into university.
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#9
Quote by minibrowny
The usual essay thing really, point, example explain. Make a point, then back it up with evidence or whatever (not always possible, mainly with figures and stats) then explain that point. I know it's not much help, its just that I dunno what type of questions you have, Im probably on a different exam board to boot.



Yep - also, look at how the question is asked.


If it says 'how', don't get caught out by spending half your time writing 'why'.
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#10
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thanks guys, that really helped, especially aaciseric
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#11
remember to examine the credibility of the sources, but only in the longer questions.

i take it you're doing the Edexcel course?
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#12
well i have an A in it. and thats before thye changed them to make them esier. argue one side argue the other cross reference, link explain. and most of all make a decision on waht you think is most important dont sit on the fence.
#13
I just took a history mock, got an A*....

Agree with everything said, but in addition for some of the questions worth less marks, you need to state something that the source implies, but doesn't directly say. So if Source A goes on about someone who eats loads of burgers and chips, it doesn't say they are unhealthy, but it implies it.

Crap example, but best i could think of.

Also, for the top top questions worth a load of marks, you need to both agree and disagree with the certain point, but then at the end give an opinion on either one and support it. Sometimes this could be singling out one important event/factor/person or sometimes its agreement or disagreement. Remember there is no incorrect answer when giving your opinion, as long as you give good info on why you chose it.
Last edited by Sacrebleu! at Dec 15, 2008,