#1
Way back when (About a year ago) when i started playing guitar, i usually went to my local music store to learn a few things. Not lessons that is. Just to learn a thing or two here and there. So after about a day or two of actually playing, i wanted to know how to tune a guitar of course.

Well, the guy told me to plug it into a tuner, hit an Open Note, and turn the tuner accordingly until you got the tune you wanted. So i had done this to all strings until i got to CGCFAD (Drop C, Low to High.)

Now, this has been the way ive been tuning my guitars since i started playing. But until recently i was told i was wrong about tuning my guitar. A kid at school said that i had to Fret the according string on the 5th Fret i believe (or possibly 3rd fret, not sure which) and tune it to E Standard, EADGBE (Low to High) and then when im done tuning my guitar, it will be in Drop C

Seeing as how i tuned the other way all my time playing, i figured he could be wrong. But then my rational side came in and thought, "Well what if hes right?" or "Is there more way to tune a guitar?"

Well UG, thats what i want you to tell me. I know its a dumb question, and someone out there is gonna make fun of me, but we were a beginner once, so help a Past version of you out, lol.

Thanks guys
#2
yeah, of course there is more than one way of tuning a guitar, you could tune to drop C, e standard, Drop D, in fact there are loads of different tunings you can use,
i think thats what you mean
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#5
yeah e standard and drop c are totally different tunings

if you're in drop c you'd have to fret the 7 on the low c to get the g anyway
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#6
Your ways not wrong if you prefer that tuning I prefer a whole step down which is DGCFAd its all a matter of opinion Stevie Ray always play a half step down its what ever you find to be the best for you
#7
Using the 5th string method is really the same as using the tuner. If you have a tuner, you can just hit every open string and tune them accordingly. If you don't have a tuner on you, then what you need to do is tune the 6th string, and then tune the 5th string (open) to the 5th fret of 6th string, tune the 4th string (open) to the 5th fret of 5th string, etc. Technically you could just use the tuner for the 6th string open and then tune with your ear from there (by using the 5th string method), but that won't be as accurate as using the tuner for every open string. Really the 5th fret method is there for when you don't have a tuner available, so it's up to how good of a pitch the person can tell and also how accurate the initial 6th string tuning is.

BTW,

CGCFAD sounds like "C" standard to me. Wouldn't "Drop C" be CADGBE? Anyway, EADGBE is called "E Standard", usually referred to as "Standard" tuning. EADGBE (or "standard") is definitely not Drop C tuning.

There are many tunings possible on a guitar. Some more popular than others. Standard, Standard half-step down (Eb,Ab,Db,Gb,Bb,Eb), Drop D, Open G, Drop B, etc.
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Last edited by MustangSVT at Dec 15, 2008,
#8
A tuner is the easiest way to reliably tune it.

You can tune a guitar to itself by fretting the note of the string above and tuning to that - so if you're in standard tuning play an A at the 5th fret of your E string and tune your A string to that, and then play a D at the 5th fret of your A string and tune your D string to that and so on.....or you can do basically the same thing using harmonics instead of fretted notes ...but unless you tune your lowest string up to something reliable first then your guitar is unlikely to be in concert pitch.

There are multiple different tunings too - check the tuning thread in 'guitar and bass basics'
#9
Quote by MustangSVT
Using the 5th string method is really the same as using the tuner. If you have a tuner, you can just hit every open string and tune them accordingly. If you don't have a tuner on you, then what you need to do is tune the 6th string, and then tune the 5th string (open) to the 5th fret of 6th string, tune the 4th string (open) to the 5th fret of 5th string, etc. Technically you could just use the tuner for the 6th string open and then tune with your ear from there (by using the 5th string method), but that won't be as accurate as using the tuner for every open string. Really the 5th fret method is there for when you don't have a tuner available, so it's up to how good of a pitch the person can tell and also how accurate the initial 6th string tuning is.

BTW,

CGCFAD sounds like "C" standard to me. Wouldn't "Drop C" be CADGBE? Anyway, EADGBE is called "E Standard", usually referred to as "Standard" tuning. EADGBE (or "standard") is definitely not Drop C tuning.

There are many tunings possible on a guitar. Some more popular than others. Standard, Standard half-step down (Eb,Ab,Db,Gb,Bb,Eb), Drop D, Open G, Drop B, etc.


No. That's Drop C... G is a fifth up from C.

To answer the topic starter, there's more than one way of tuning a guitar. Some tunings are more conducive to certain styles of music, that's all.

**EDIT: Re-reading your post I think you are confused as to the meaning of "drop" terminology... basically 'drop' anything means you tune the lowest string to that note, then tune the next string a fifth up from that, and all the other strings as in standard in relation to that string. For instance, Drop D is DADGBE because you tune the low string to D, then the next string a fifth up, A, then tune the guitar in the normal fourths (and third for the second/third string relationship). Drop Eb would be Db Ab Db Gb Bb Eb.
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Last edited by Mo Jiggity at Dec 15, 2008,
#10
Theres always more than 1 way to do anything, I think his method refers more to tuning by ear though
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#12
If you have it in a Standard Tuning, C standard, D standard, E standard, you can use the 5th fret to make the same note as the string above it, so you can relative tune by ear. Tune it how you may wish.
#13
ok, i get it now... we're both right, lol.

And as for the tuning, i meant Drop C as in starting at E standard and Starting with the low E string going 2 steps down, and the rest one step down, or in D standard, going one step down on the low D

sorry for the confusion, lol
#14
Quote by SMB13
ok, i get it now... we're both right, lol.

And as for the tuning, i meant Drop C as in starting at E standard and Starting with the low E string going 2 steps down, and the rest one step down, or in D standard, going one step down on the low D

sorry for the confusion, lol


D Standard is all strings a full step down I think drop D is what you were looking for.
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#15
Do it your way, its fine. There are many different ways to go about it. I do 12th fret harmonics cause it seems more accurate me to...that is if your intonation is set up properly.
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#16
Tell the kid he is a douche that needs to think before he speaks. Nothing aggravates me more than someone who is convinced they are right that tells other people they are wrong when they dont know what the hell they are talking about...
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#17
Quote by Lethal Dosage
Theres always more than 1 way to do anything, I think his method refers more to tuning by ear though

I think this is what he was asking from the start, is it possible to tune the guitar using the notes from other strings rather than a tuner. You do need a reference point for at least one string though, there are sites online that can generate different pitches for you. That way you learn to tune by ear. In E standard playing the 5th fret of the bottom E string will give you the pitch for the A string for instance. It might take a bit of practice but you will really benefit in the long run as it will help develop your ear.