#1
This seems like the right place...

But recently I realized getting a teacher would be a pretty good idea. I've been playing for about 3 years and I'm to the point where I can play a lot of the stuff I want to play, but not enough of it.

What I mean is I'm a decent rhythm player but I can't even begin to solo. I just don't have the self-discipline to get faster. I understand the building blocks of theory but I couldn't tell you what all the notes in a certain scale is, but I could figure it out just fine.

So when looking for a teacher... How will I know if I have a good one?

Should I ask them what they can teach me? or would they normally ask me before an agreement?

I appreciate anyones help a ton.
I'm Tyler
#2
my suggestion is to try and find a jazz guitarist as an instructor. my instructor is a jazz fusion guitarist and he's insanely awesome. since the genre itself is very demanding you'll know that your teacher will be able to teach you. and if that isn't possible you could simply find numerous teachers and somewhat interview them when u attend a sample session. ask them how long they've played and **** like that. eventually you'll find one that will meet your criteria and will take you where you want to be with guitar. hope this helps.
#3
ring them up and tell them the style you play and how much you know already and what you want to play. If they can cover it then have a few lessons with them and see if you;re gaining anything from it. Also check around the area and see if there are any people who have a good reputation for teaching.
Quote by boreamor
Ah very good point. Charlie__flynn, you've out smarted me


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#4
i'm in the exact shape you're in TS. i wish i could find a teacher.
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#7
The jazz guitarist idea seems pretty good thanks. And thanks for the tips Charlie.

EDIT:
Quote by masterbait
well if you have the money, this is probably THE best option
http://tomhess.net/

Explain yourself
I'm Tyler
Last edited by Octtwe88 at Dec 15, 2008,
#8
buy a book on scales & modes, books will teach you as much as you want to learn and alot cheaper than a teacher, i was in a similar position to you around the same sort of playing time, i learnt the modes of the major scale, nailed them on guitar, what notes do what etc.. in a couple of months i knew most of the neck what mode to use, the best approach to a chords etc.. its easy just have faith and dont give up at the first sign of trouble

quick example... play your major scale in C - C D E F G A B C - aka Ionian Mode
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1

now play the same thing but start on D - D E F G A B C D - aka Dorian Mode..the 2nd mode as it comes of the 2nd note of the major scale...
1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 1
or start on A - A B C D E F G A - Aeolian Mode (Or natural minor) the 6th mode, comes off the 6th note, see the connection here?
1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1

then take it from there...if you do it in G major theres only one sharp (F#) so now its

G A B C D E F# G
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1

the numbers are just formulas same formular for the scale/mode no matter what key, C major is same as G Major, same scale pattern and Formula, just one note difference.

the formulas will help you construct chords against the scale, if someone asked me to play a Gm7add13, id be lost......but...because i kept using the formulas you take the formula of the chord which for minor7 is 1 b3 5 b7...and the 13th is the 6th note of the scale (7 notes in a scale...so take 7 away from 13 = 6) but because its a 13th its played on the 6th higher than the octave. in terms of the scale the formula now is 1 b3 5 b7 13

there are 3 minor modes in the major scale ( dorian 2nd - phrygian 3rd - aeolian 6th)

because that chord (Gm7add13) has a regular 13 (not flat or sharp) i no it comes from dorian mode..as its the only minor mode with a regular 6th (or 13th) so over that chord you would use ya dorian mode to solo etc..

this is alot to take in, keep reading it over and it will eventually make sense.

and you will never forget this ****!
I am living proof i learnt it at college 2 and a half years ago and ive barely played since then i just pick up my guitar n muck about for half an hour here n there, i havent seriously practiced in over 2 and a half years!

as for playing wise, just learn the stuff u want and use the licks you like.

dont try and go to out of your league, theres no shame in learning stuff thats basic.

if you want any help PM me n i'll do my best
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#9
Quote by Octtwe88
This seems like the right place...

But recently I realized getting a teacher would be a pretty good idea. I've been playing for about 3 years and I'm to the point where I can play a lot of the stuff I want to play, but not enough of it.

What I mean is I'm a decent rhythm player but I can't even begin to solo. I just don't have the self-discipline to get faster. I understand the building blocks of theory but I couldn't tell you what all the notes in a certain scale is, but I could figure it out just fine.

So when looking for a teacher... How will I know if I have a good one?

Should I ask them what they can teach me? or would they normally ask me before an agreement?

I appreciate anyones help a ton.


Ask around, and find a teacher in your area that has a good reputation.
shred is gaudy music
#10
Quote by rock_guitargod
buy a book on scales & modes, books will teach you as much as you want to learn and alot cheaper than a teacher, i was in a similar position to you around the same sort of playing time, i learnt the modes of the major scale, nailed them on guitar, what notes do what etc.. in a couple of months i knew most of the neck what mode to use, the best approach to a chords etc.. its easy just have faith and dont give up at the first sign of trouble

Hey thanks a lot, I may do that. To be more specific what I'm looking for is to get faster, be a better player. I do want to learn theory and all but thats just what i was getting at. A teacher would help motivate me to play when usually i would just sit around and play video games.
I'm Tyler
#11
^
Eh... Not necessarily. The best thing about a teacher is that they'll get inside your head. Everyone has different tastes, and everyone has their own opinion. If you have a teacher, he will give you examples of songs that he likes. This will in turn expose you to new styles/artists. The best thing about teachers is that they will approach something completely differently from the way that you will, but you'll be influenced by that. It ultimately does shape the guitarist that you become.

But don't go spending money on lessons if you think that you'll just magically be inspired. That's not how it works. You're either motivated or you aren't. In the short term, it probably will help you, but you eventually are going to need to find your own motivation to pick it up. For me, there's an endless world of possibilities on the guitar. You can always become a better player technically, or you can try and take a different approach on a mode or a scale, to try and be unique. Little things like that, if they interest you, will keep you motivated. But if you're more interested in reaching a 50 in Lone Wolves on Halo 3, then that's what you're probably gonna spend your time doing.
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Last edited by Page&HammettFan at Dec 15, 2008,