#1
If we take the A-minor Pentatonic (Blues) Scale, i've seen lessons that say the 'C' note (e.g. 3rd string, 5th fret) is a good note to apply a small curl/blues-bend to, and that the 'D' note (3rd string, 7th fret) is good for a full tone bend... presumabely therefore there are other notes that aren't so good to bend or not recommended? What are these?

For example, would you bend the root note 'A' (4th string, 7th fret), if so it'd need a pretty big bend to get the 'C' on the 10th fret?

Any tips appreciated.
#2
Quote by geetarmanic
If we take the A-minor Pentatonic (Blues) Scale, i've seen lessons that say the 'C' note (e.g. 3rd string, 5th fret) is a good note to apply a small curl/blues-bend to, and that the 'D' note (3rd string, 7th fret) is good for a full tone bend... presumabely therefore there are other notes that aren't so good to bend or not recommended? What are these?

For example, would you bend the root note 'A' (4th string, 7th fret), if so it'd need a pretty big bend to get the 'C' on the 10th fret?

Any tips appreciated.


If you go by Marty friedman's concept, you can bend any note you want.

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#3
Really you can give any string a bluesy 'quarter bend' which is just a little up. but you can bend any of the notes, it doesnt have to bend to another note in the scale, you can always resolve the bend by playing a note from the scale after it.
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#4
The most common notes to bend are (in Am) C up to D and G up to A; that would be the classic blues approach. Another cool little riff is to bend C up a quarter step (between C and C#) over an A7 chord.

You can move that to whatever key you want, of course.
#5
...All of them
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#6
Quote by xxdarrenxx
If you go by Marty friedman's concept, you can bend any note you want.


Even if you don't..... you can bend any note. (Friedman certainly didn't invent the concept.... literally millions of guitarists are aware that you can bend any note)

Just be aware of where you are bending it to. Generally you bend it to the next note in the scale. With the pentatonic scales some of the bends will be big (like 1&1/2 steps), and will be difficult at certain parts of the neck.
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#7
+1

Stop a second and ask yourself what a bend actually is...ultimately it's just another way to move between two notes. Rather than just randomly bending notes because you feel you should actually listen to what's going on and like Munky said think more about the note you're bending to rather than the one you're bending from.
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#8
^Nice. That's a good way to think of it, why did I never think that way before - I feel so stupid. I just went through trial and error to find nice bends and worked intuitively but that makes much more sense.
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#9
You shouldn't be bending any note. Some notes just don't sound good bent. Please don't bend a C over Am and expect it to sound peachy, that would create a b4'th which is a really unpleasant harmonic interval.

You should be bending towards chord tones, so if you're playing over a Am chord you should hit D's and bend them to C's and so on. I guess you could bend towards accidentals, but remember that accidentals need to be used with caution (as in, don't use an accidental on a stressed beat).

In a Randy Rhoads lick I've seen he bends the D note (in Am pentatonic) up to a Eb, which makes a diminished fifth with the chord playing. This sounds good because he uses the diminished fifth as an accidental and doesn't hang on that note.
I'm not saying you can't hang on to accidentals though, it's your solo.

Or, you could take the clapton aproach. Pick a note, bend it till it sounds right. Repeat.

Anyway, my belief is that bends are just an awesome way to get to a note, just like doing a slide or whatever.

Also, T/S, if you're up for it; learn your theory and start thinking in theoretical terms when you play. This way if you find something that sounds good you can remember it and use the same effect for any chord (zomg, going from x interval to y interval sounds awesome), not just remembering frets or notes which you could only apply to that particular chord.
#10
Quote by demonofthenight
In a Randy Rhoads lick I've seen he bends the D note (in Am pentatonic) up to a Eb, which makes a diminished fifth with the chord playing. This sounds good because he uses the diminished fifth as an accidental and doesn't hang on that note.
A related lick I like (in Bm) is bending E up to F# and then releasing the bend and immediately bending E to F with a pinch harmonic. I follow that with some kind of lick to resolve to a nice-sounding note, but in a hard rock or metal context, the pinch harmonic on the b5 sounds, well, bitchin!