#1
Hey when I'm working on the pentatonic scales, how important is the finger position of the fretting hand?

Clearly it needs to be able to sound out the note - but from a technique perspective, should I be focusing on just sounding out the individual notes clearly? Should I be ensuring that as I hit the first notes on the 6th string, my fingers are not at risk of buzzing the 5th strings (yeah I know - it's not a chord, it's not played). Starting on string 6 fret 5 with my index finger, then moving to string six fret 8 with my pinkie, should I ensure that I keep my index finger on the fret board when playing out the 8th fret? Or am I ok to lift it off and get it down to the 5th string in preparation?


Just looking to ensure that I try to learn the correct habits.
#2
Yes, you should definitely play each note audibly, and only on the intended string
and theres no reason to keep your finger on a note thats not going to be used again
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#3
You don't "work on the pentatonic scale".

A scale is NOT a technique, it's a musical tool to help you understand and compose music. If you want to work on your picking technique then you can obviously use a scale pattern to do that but there is very little to be gained from working on straight scale patterns, and you should never be concerned with how fast you can play a scale.

Like I said, approach it as "a technique exerciase using a scale pattern", and with that in mind you approach it exactly the same way as everything else, focus on fretting and picking cleanly and accurately.
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#4
Quote by steven seagull
You don't "work on the pentatonic scale".

A scale is NOT a technique, it's a musical tool to help you understand and compose music. If you want to work on your picking technique then you can obviously use a scale pattern to do that but there is very little to be gained from working on straight scale patterns, and you should never be concerned with how fast you can play a scale.

Like I said, approach it as "a technique exerciase using a scale pattern", and with that in mind you approach it exactly the same way as everything else, focus on fretting and picking cleanly and accurately.



Thanks! That makes perfect sense actually.
#5
i suppose that if you want to develop good finger strength, then yes use the proper fingering techniques. in other words yes, use the proper fingerings.
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