#1
Now I learned the formulas for most chords like

maj6 1 - 3 - 5 - 6
maj7 1 - 3 - 5 - 7
min6 1 - b3 - 5 - 6
min7 1 - b3 - 5 - b7
dom7 1- 3 - 5 - b7
7#(7aug) 1 - 3 - #5 - b7

And I was wondering what my next step could be in learning chord theory
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#3
^ basically

Just figure out when a maj works as a maj6 or not, etc. Then you could use them in songs.
#4
Thanks, where shall I start learning this? (lesson, article or maybe)
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#8
the next thing you might wanna learn is 9, 11, 13 chords, minMajor, and diminished chords.

I made a little guide(or drawing) to help in learning all of this, if you want it, send me a message and I'll send it to you. This guide helped me in finding more variations besides the usual shapes.
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#10
Once you have the basic triads and seventh chords down the extensions and alterations aren't too difficult to comprehend.

What do you know about chord families? Substitution, constructing chord progressions, root movement and voice leading?

These are all good things to know.
Si
#11
Quote by 20Tigers
Once you have the basic triads and seventh chords down the extensions and alterations aren't too difficult to comprehend.

What do you know about chord families? Substitution, constructing chord progressions, root movement and voice leading?

These are all good things to know.

Quite right, knowing what species all the trees are called won't stop you from getting lost in a forest. Learn FUNCTIONAL harmony. i.e how chords etc operate in relation to each other and their keys.
#12
Quote by R.Christie
Quite right, knowing what species all the trees are called won't stop you from getting lost in a forest. Learn FUNCTIONAL harmony. i.e how chords etc operate in relation to each other and their keys.


...but knowing what species of trees are in what area within the forest can help you find the edge and escape to freedom.
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#14
So i'm supposed to play music according to Music theory? since when did theory dictate the music?

BTW the last reply was meant as a philosophical retort.
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Last edited by allislost at Dec 16, 2008,
#15
Everything in this thread is music theory.

Learning how chords relate to each other and why certain chords resolve to other chords so well is very beneficial. At the end of the day you will still be using your ear to determine what sounds good and what doesn't - not theory. Theory will just tell you how it works.

Understanding root movement, voice leading , chord families, and chord substitution will help you identify important elements in a musical composition.

Your ear will determine whether or not something works - theory will help you understand why and what is making your song work AFTER you have written it.

Likewise your ear will determine whether or not a song fails. Theory will help you understand why it fails.

It can help you come up with new ideas or suggest solutions when you get stuck. But at the end of the day it is your ear that will decide whether these new ideas or solutions work or don't.

Music theory is not a how to guide to writing songs, and no one here is suggesting that it is. Music theory is nothing more than the observations of scholars and musical geniuses throughout history that have studied music for their entire lives. If you have no respect for that fine. But that doesn't change the fact that it can be a very useful tool to have under your belt.

Why is it good? Studying what geniuses that have gone before observed in music will open your mind to concepts youmay have never thought of yourself and will allow you new ways of understanding music. This in turn might allow you to expand on these concepts and alter them to suit your tastes or situation.

When music theory is studied properly it allows a deeper understanding of music. I don't see how this can do anything other than make you a better musician and composer.

Everyone raised on western music and that is learning to play keyboards or guitar will eventually figure out the importance of the V-I relationship. Whether they are taught it in a formal "music theory" way or figure it out for themselves.

Likewise many of the other chordal relationships are more subtle but nevertheless can be picked up over time. However having these presented in an easy to understand explanation and then going away and internalising the ideas through playing, hearing and experiencing the concepts is useful to many.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Dec 16, 2008,
#16
Quote by R.Christie
Quite right, knowing what species all the trees are called won't stop you from getting lost in a forest. Learn FUNCTIONAL harmony. i.e how chords etc operate in relation to each other and their keys.


wher to go about doing that? i have a huge chord vocabulary, but whenever i play chords they usually sound like **** together.
Quote by Zero-Hartman
The Bible is awesome. Revelation is so badass, I mean, dragons and angels and the devil having an epic battle in the clouds? Badass.
#17
Quote by 20Tigers
Everything in this thread is music theory.

Learning how chords relate to each other and why certain chords resolve to other chords so well is very beneficial. At the end of the day you will still be using your ear to determine what sounds good and what doesn't - not theory. Theory will just tell you how it works.

Understanding root movement, voice leading , chord families, and chord substitution will help you identify important elements in a musical composition.

Your ear will determine whether or not something works - theory will help you understand why and what is making your song work AFTER you have written it.

Likewise your ear will determine whether or not a song fails. Theory will help you understand why it fails.

It can help you come up with new ideas or suggest solutions when you get stuck. But at the end of the day it is your ear that will decide whether these new ideas or solutions work or don't.

Music theory is not a how to guide to writing songs, and no one here is suggesting that it is. Music theory is nothing more than the observations of scholars and musical geniuses throughout history that have studied music for their entire lives. If you have no respect for that fine. But that doesn't change the fact that it can be a very useful tool to have under your belt.

Why is it good? Studying what geniuses that have gone before observed in music will open your mind to concepts youmay have never thought of yourself and will allow you new ways of understanding music. This in turn might allow you to expand on these concepts and alter them to suit your tastes or situation.

When music theory is studied properly it allows a deeper understanding of music. I don't see how this can do anything other than make you a better musician and composer.

Everyone raised on western music and that is learning to play keyboards or guitar will eventually figure out the importance of the V-I relationship. Whether they are taught it in a formal "music theory" way or figure it out for themselves.

Likewise many of the other chordal relationships are more subtle but nevertheless can be picked up over time. However having these presented in an easy to understand explanation and then going away and internalising the ideas through playing, hearing and experiencing the concepts is useful to many.


ok... how is this different from what i said in my last 2 replies?
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#18
Quote by Shadow_Hawk
wher to go about doing that? i have a huge chord vocabulary, but whenever i play chords they usually sound like **** together.

Well you're making a start by being in places like this with an open mind.
Granted, it is difficult to just go out and take a course in functional harmony as applied to certain musical genres. However information on how chords lead to each other, cadencial relationships, voice leading etc can be picked up in a large degree in traditional harmony courses (study of common practice techniques). A lot of material in such a course may not have immediate relevance to you or the music you are currently interested in, or in some cases, is material you may never use - but it will stand you in good stead and allow you all the the benefits mentioned above by Si.
Music is a wide subject, aspects of functional harmony can also be picked up by studying a wide range of other musical practices, this is what colleges and conservatoriums of music do. Good courses offer study of changing musical practices throughout history, study of counterpoint, arrangement and orchestration, even composition. They all have something different to offer but almost all rely, to a greater or lesser extent, on working knowledge of common practice and functional harmony.
Knowing the name of a chord or how to put one together from an involved "spelling" doesn't mean diddly squat unless one knows where the chord has come from and where it is going, ie. its musical context.
Last edited by R.Christie at Dec 17, 2008,
#20
that was gold. its bookmarked now and im reading it all.
Quote by Zero-Hartman
The Bible is awesome. Revelation is so badass, I mean, dragons and angels and the devil having an epic battle in the clouds? Badass.