#1
Ok I'm kinda confused here. I have been reading and I know the first three positions of the Major Scale...now... It said that if I wanted to use the G Major scale in any key I simply use ANY position but just begin on the root note.
Like This: This would be the GMajor scale right?

|-----------------------------2-3-5--|
|-------------------------3-5--------|
|-------------------2-4-5------------|
|-------------2-4-5------------------| the numbers are the fret numbers
|-------2-3-5------------------------|
|---3-5------------------------------|


Does that mean that that the GMajor scale can begin on the 3fret on the 6th string and that makes it in the key of G?
Does that also mean that I can use, say, the fourth position and still begin on the note G on the 6th string and that would STILL be the GMajor scale?

Sorry if it's too much but this stuff is pretty interesting
#3
That's the G major scale based off the "E"shaped barre chord. I assume you're calling that 3rd position. You can not play the fourth position starting on the G note on the sixth string and be in G major scale.

The notes you have outlined above are all and the ONLY notes in the G scale between frets 2 and 5.

The notes are G A B C D E F# G

If you played a different pattern starting on the same note you will get different notes won't you? Therefore you will have a different scale.


What you want to do is figure out where the root notes are in each pattern and then align them to the correct root notes on the fretboard.

There are 3 G notes in the pattern above. One on the low E 3rd fret, one on the high E 3rd fret and one on the D string fifth fret.

The next pattern will use this D string fifth fret root and will cover the G major scale from the 4th to 8th frets. It will have a second root note on the B string at the 7th 8th fret.

It will cover the same notes G A B C D E F# G just further up the neck.

All the five patterns link up and form one big pattern spanning the entire fretboard. If you move the pattern up and down you will be moving between different major scales. For example moving the whole pattern you gave up two frets will give you the A major scale.

Also, it does not matter whether you start or finish on a root note. That is not what it makes it a G major scale. However for practice you should try to start and finish on the root notes and play all the notes in the pattern. This will help you remember where the root notes of each pattern are.

When you pull the G major scale out later for improvisation it will be the establishment of a tonic G root that will make it sound major in quality as once the ear identifies the G as the root so all the note of the scale are then heard in relation to this root.

When you are studying these shapes you should practice finding the roots in each shape. The root chord in each shape. and then all the notes in the pattern. Then practice linking the patterns together.

So I hope somewhere in there I have answered your question. I have some pictures showing all the major scale patterns and how they link up to form one big pattern over the whole fretboard. if I can find them I'll post them for you.

Good Luck.
Si
#4
All the five patterns link up and form one big pattern spanning the entire fretboard. If you move the pattern up and down you will be moving between different major scales. For example moving the whole pattern you gave up two frets will give you the A major scale.


So that means if i wanted to make the A Major scale I should just use the same pattern just begin on the note A on the 6th string (thickest) Correct?
#5
It doesn't matter where you "start"...like 20 tigers said the notes of G major are G A B C D E F#. As long as you're using those notes over a chord progression that resolves to G major then you're using the G major scale. Likewise the notes of A major are A B C# D E F# G# and if you use those notes over a progression that resolves to A major then you're using the A major scale....the patterns and shapes are irrelevant in that respect, they're just where those notes appear. Obviously those patterns are what you'll be using to navigate around the fretboard but they aren't what dictates the nature of the scale itself.
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#6
Quote by LedZepFan2000
So that means if i wanted to make the A Major scale I should just use the same pattern just begin on the note A on the 6th string (thickest) Correct?

Yes that is correct. The pattern you gave is the pattern of notes for the G major scale. Moving that pattern up so that it starts on 5th fret of the bass E string (thickest) then you will have the A major scale.

Here's the forms of the CAGED system as I learned them...











The root notes are in blue. These are major scale patterns.
You might notice how in form 1 the root notes are on the B string and the A string. Then in Form 2 the root note is on the A string and the D string. The root note on the A string is shared by both Form 1 and Form 2. They overlap. Then Form 3 overlaps Form 2 with both of them sharing the same root note on the D string. And it keeps going each pattern shares a root note with the pattern before and the pattern after. Form 5 shares the root note on the B string with Form 1 so it goes in a full circle.

Each pattern has a specific root shape (or octave shape) between the two roots in the pattern. These root shapes can be beefed out to form a major chord shape. See if you can find the root chord shape in each of the major scale patterns.

Anyway hope this helps. Any more questions just ask.
Si