#1
so ive been predominantly a rock/blues/jazz player for a while, but ive decided to study music in college meaning i need to know classical as well. ive been working on the classical fingerpicking, and one thing that always comes up is the rest stroke. everybody ive talked to has said to practice the rest stroke a lot, and it seems really really important. my question is, why is it so important if your hardly ever going to use it, since in most songs the string adjacent to the string your playing is still ringing? i still practice it and everything, i just would kind of like to know the importance of what im practicing
#2
Segovia said that the rest stroke was the single most important factor in becoming a master at classical technique, Segovia's word is law. The rest stroke helps a lot for dynamics and teaches you control of your playing hand.
Quote by Thepoison92
Go as a tampon
White shirt, white hat, white trousers (cheap ones) and cover the bottom half in fake blood, also have to write 'Tampax' on the shirt, so people know what you are and can then be disgusted.
#3
Your question is very sensible.
I hold to the school of thought that the free stroke is by far and away the most important plucking action in the plucking hand's technical arsenal. The free stroke can almost be regarded as the "default" stroke and the rest stroke regarded as the exception to the rule, some modern masters, such as David Russell, hardly employ the rest stroke at all. Segovia, and Tarrega before him, placed far to much emphasis on the rest stroke and thankfully players have been, over the past couple of decades, re-evaluating much of the "Segovian school" in terms of technique.

Of greater import, and this is my opinion, based on over two decades of teaching, is which ought to be learnt first - rest or free. As far as I can discern there is very little advantage in learning the former first except to develop an early appreciation of full tone. In contrast to free stroke, playing rest strokes early does very little, if anything, toward fostering good right hand position. You actually require a good right hand position to perform free stroke whereas an acceptable rest stroke tone can be readily achieved with an indifferent hand position. In addition - why learn the exception first?
I could write pages of stuff on this, the technical detail etc and the historical practices and essential differences between the various approaches of Aguado, Sor, Arcas, Tarrega and Pujol, and Segovia more recently Carlevaro.
Last edited by R.Christie at Dec 18, 2008,
#4
when i learned the rest stroke it helped me alot with getting a good free stroke. because most people when they start fingerpicking they just do something random with really bad form which usually results in little volume or tone. i mean a free stroke is really just a rest stroke tilted alittle bit so i think practicing the rest stroke can help you get more relaxed and full bodied free stroke.
#5
Quote by r2zou
<snip> i mean a free stroke is really just a rest stroke tilted alittle bit so i think practicing the rest stroke can help you get more relaxed and full bodied free stroke.

Although the claim that the strokes are essentially the same can be debated the observation that rest stroke sets you up for free stroke is valid only if the rest stroke is performed from an initially good hand position. Let me explain slowly. The problem arises in that you don't need a good hand position to produce a good sound with a rest stroke. A beginner or inexperienced player can drop the wrist way too low, or have the knuckles too far removed toward the bass strings, for a good free stroke tone and finger action and yet still play a robust rest stroke. If such faulty position becomes a habit (and what incentive is provided for a beginner to correct it - after all it produces an acceptable sound) then later free stroke action is severely compromised. A good hand position is almost essential to enable free stroke. Therefore a beginner has far greater incentive to adopt such a good hand position. Once the hand is set up for free stroke production rest stroke follows easily. It is less likely vice versa.
Last edited by R.Christie at Dec 18, 2008,
#6
Problem with rest stroke (Apoyando) is that it's very hard to teach a student to position themselves properly unlike like free stroke (tirando). But if learn rest stroke you will more and more uses for it. As you mentioned above R.Christie, in classical piece the adjacent string is suppose to be ringing. So look for parts where the second voice isn't use. In most pieces by composers like Sor and Carulli, Ponce(was asked on request on many occasions by Segovia to compose for segovia) , Aguado, Tarrega ect. You'll find the second voicing occasionally has the whole bar rest while the first voicing is still used.

Yes a begginer should start of with free stroke and not rest stroke I agree with that but
the rest stroke is vital.
#7
Quote by GoldenGuitar
Problem with rest stroke (Apoyando) is that it's very hard to teach a student to position themselves properly unlike like free stroke (tirando). But if learn rest stroke you will more and more uses for it. As you mentioned above R.Christie, in classical piece the adjacent string is suppose to be ringing. So look for parts where the second voice isn't use. In most pieces by composers like Sor and Carulli, Ponce(was asked on request on many occasions by Segovia to compose for segovia) , Aguado, Tarrega ect. You'll find the second voicing occasionally has the whole bar rest while the first voicing is still used.

Yes a begginer should start of with free stroke and not rest stroke I agree with that but
the rest stroke is vital.

Which, in reference to another thread, is yet another reason why the AMEB technical syllabus is poor, it makes it mandatory for a teacher to present a pupil at elementry level using only apoyando technique. That is fine for teachers that use that approach but proscriptive of teachers who don't.
#8
alright, well, ive been watching some video lessons and looking at this and i have a pretty good idea on where to start. gonna try to start some simple scale runs using each type of stroke. thanks