#1
So I was playing my recently acquired G&L Legacy (late 1980s model) through my Crate BT220 bass amp (my normal amp was left at my drummer's house for convenience's sake) and my Digitech BP50 pedal.

Here's the situation. The guitar had a slight grounding issue that I had noticed recently (occasionally, you would have to wiggle the bottom tone knob to get rid of buzzing--the kind that normally, placing your hands on the strings eliminates). My BP50 was running on AC adapter that is plugged into socket A in the far left corner of the room. My amp is plugged, via three-prong ground plug, into an APC surge protector which is also plugged in via three-pronger into my wall socket.

Thus far, I saw no obvious issue. The BP50 is getting low-level DC power from the wall wart, so I doubt that had anything to do with it. The amp is grounded and stuff.

But why, then, did I receive a rather nasty electric shock through my strings and into my arm during normal playing? Is there a fault in the above situation that I missed?
#2
But why, then, did I receive a rather nasty electric shock through my strings and into my arm during normal playing? Is there a fault in the above situation that I missed?


You must have an electrifying playing style.

I have no idea, I really just wanted to say that.
Gear
Guitar
Kramer Striker (JB + Jazz)
Amps
Blackstar HT-5C
Vox Valvetronix AD30VT-XL
Pedals
Dunlop DB-01 Crybaby From Hell
Digitech HardWire CM-2 Tube Overdrive
Boss DS-1
#3
You said it yourself, the guitar has a slight grounding issue. Why don't you plug your BP-50 into that same surge protector?
Quote by sargasm
There are no genres in metal that end with "core."
#4
I got shocked by my own guitar too...but that was because of a blast of lightning from the sky that nearly killed my amp.
#5
but if you did have that grounding issue recently...maybe some sort of damage/problem with your amp's output, or your guitar's pickups....but that's weird. It happens if you drop either of the two....did you?
#6
Quote by Tezzquill
I got shocked by my own guitar too...but that was because of a blast of lightning from the sky that nearly killed my amp.


The only reason I think this is bull****, no surge protector or fuse box on the planet can protect from that much electricity. Your amp, and you, would be dead.

On topic: I'd say get the guitar looked over for grounding issues... or check it yourself?
Quote by sargasm
There are no genres in metal that end with "core."
#7
Quote by `digitaL.braVo
The only reason I think this is bull****, no surge protector or fuse box on the planet can protect from that much electricity. Your amp, and you, would be dead.

On topic: I'd say get the guitar looked over for grounding issues... or check it yourself?


yea, itz a bizzare experience alright, but the lightning was miles away, it did not strike anything in my area at all, but my amp definitely buzzed hard and my strings shocked me at that moment. I won't expect you to believe it tho.
#8
If your guitar is not grounded properly, as you've already identified, then you can become the ground causing you to get shocked.

There is also a slight chance your amp is not grounded properly exasperating the problem.

Best thing to do if you are not handy with a soldering iron is to take it to a guitar tech and have him/her check all your solder joints in the guitar, look for loose wiring, insert jack, and finally make sure the ground wire in guitar is soldered down tight. While you are at it you can also get the inside cavity and underside of pickgaurd shielded. Nice to have mainly to reduce feedback or hiss.

Then if you still have a problem, get the amp looked at to make sure it's grounded too. I doubt the pedal is causing anything. Good luck.

Edit: as digitalbravo stated already.
Last edited by 311ZOSOVHJH at Dec 18, 2008,
#9
Quote by Tezzquill
yea, itz a bizzare experience alright, but the lightning was miles away, it did not strike anything in my area at all, but my amp definitely buzzed hard and my strings shocked me at that moment. I won't expect you to believe it tho.


That's extremely different from having your house struck by lightning. That means you got a very severe power surge.

Nothing you can dream of touches the sheer might of a bolt of lightning and what it can, and will, completely destroy.
Quote by sargasm
There are no genres in metal that end with "core."
#10
Thanks, I'll look into getting the guitar wiring checked out then. Other than that little flaw in the guitar, everything else seems fine. The amp is relatively new (~8 months?) and I don't beat it up too much--jostling in the car a bit, but I've never dropped it or anything.

Will shielding the guitar assist with single-coil buzzing?