#1
I'm a self-taught guitarist of almost eight years.
I've never taken any lessons or classes, but I've taken both Music Theory and Piano, which has helped quite a bit as far as music theory goes. But my knowledge is pretty basic, and I always have a hard time relating that to guitar.

So I bought the book Fretboard Logic and it has cleared up some things, but there are some places that I just hit a huge brick in the wall and can't find my way around it.

Basically it says that the CAGED sequence is continuous throughout the entire fretboard, which I understand as far as chords go, but when it comes to playing scales, and I play in C with the C scale in the C form, does that mean that the A scale that comes after that is technically the C scale as well? Just in A form? And therefore I can play any of those notes in all of those scales relative to C scale in C form and still be in key?

I know the answer is probably obvious, but I just can't seem to wrap my head around it. I've developed so many bad and lazy habits through teaching myself that it's almost as if I'm learning guitar for the first time.

Also, I have a bad tendency to use a lot of Power Chords. They're just easier to me I guess. But my question regarding that is simply how can I stop?

Will it help me out a lot to learn where every note is on the fretbaord, as far as breaking that habit?

Thanks in advanced. Any answers are appreciated.
Quote by Guitar0player
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#2
Yeah you should totally learn all the notes, and learn what all the intervals look like too. If you are playin a song in Cmaj, and you're playing over a Cmaj chord, you can use the Amin scale pattern, but you'll actually be playin the Cmaj scale because hopefully you will be revolving your solo between the 135 of a Cmaj chord. Do you understand modes?
#3
Yes! Learning every note on the fretboard will help immensely. Everything will make sense, and learning scales will be so much easier to comprehend

I don't really understand you're main question about the caged but I think you're talking about relative scales (someone correct me if I'm wrong please). The C major scale's relative minor is A minor. They have the same notes, just different tonal centres (what that means is you center the sound around the A note in the scale, here it'd make sense to know the fretboard notes)

Did that help?
#4
I think, also, more importantly than learning ALL the notes... is to learn how finger your 3rds and fifths and such relative to your root note anywhere on the fretboard. So you can do jazz style chord voicings with ease :3
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#5
Quote by Rave765
Yes! Learning every note on the fretboard will help immensely. Everything will make sense, and learning scales will be so much easier to comprehend

I don't really understand you're main question about the caged but I think you're talking about relative scales (someone correct me if I'm wrong please). The C major scale's relative minor is A minor. They have the same notes, just different tonal centres (what that means is you center the sound around the A note in the scale, here it'd make sense to know the fretboard notes)

Did that help?


I meant more like how the scale just spans across like 4 frets.
What do I do if I want to play some notes near the headstock and some near the bridge?

Because from what I understand, say you're playing the C form on the 4th fret but want to play outside that box, would to play the A form where C ends? To stay in key?

I don't know if that makes sense at all.

Quote by rusty-knives
I think, also, more importantly than learning ALL the notes... is to learn how finger your 3rds and fifths and such relative to your root note anywhere on the fretboard. So you can do jazz style chord voicings with ease :3


Is there anyway you can show me an example or explain that better?
I mean I understand intervals for the most part. In fact that was where we left off when my Music Theory class ended. But since I learned that on piano, I'm still having a hard time transferring that to guitar.

Which is probably where learning all the notes would come in handy.
Quote by Guitar0player
You're Thurstonsexual

Happily E-Married to En_zed
The public doesn't want new music; the main thing that it demands of a composer is that he be dead.
-- Arthur Honegger

Enjoy reading? Please crit my work .
#6
Sorry but I'm having a hard time understanding you. Basically you're saying you want to play in different positions on the fretboard. Well that's when you learn different scale positions so you can play the notes all over the neck and stay in key. If you use your root notes to navigate you should be fine, the roots are in different positions. Really though, learn the notes on the fretboard..it's not hard and its mostly just a memory game.

Download this, it will help you remember

http://www.francoisbrisson.com/fretboardwarrior/download.html
#7
Quote by Rave765
Sorry but I'm having a hard time understanding you. Basically you're saying you want to play in different positions on the fretboard. Well that's when you learn different scale positions so you can play the notes all over the neck and stay in key. If you use your root notes to navigate you should be fine, the roots are in different positions. Really though, learn the notes on the fretboard..it's not hard and its mostly just a memory game.

Download this, it will help you remember

http://www.francoisbrisson.com/fretboardwarrior/download.html


I just don't know how to get out of that box

Cause in the book, they give me the form like this:



What I don't get is literally, on the fretboard, what comes next? Like physically, geographically. After I've played this form on say the 5th fret low E, in order to get lower, physically, towards the bridge, on the fretboard, what do I play?

Like what I'm not getting is how I turn that form into a scale that incorporates the entire fretboard.

From what I understand, it's all the forms continuously, and what determines the key is just where you play it, as in the root note or whatever.

Because in the book, its showing me how when one form ends, another one begins.

Like when the C form ends, A begins, when that ends, G starts...

God I'm more confused then I was before
Quote by Guitar0player
You're Thurstonsexual

Happily E-Married to En_zed
The public doesn't want new music; the main thing that it demands of a composer is that he be dead.
-- Arthur Honegger

Enjoy reading? Please crit my work .
#8
i got fretboard logic too...

what comes next would be the next shape.

since that looks like the G shape iirc, then right under it is the E shape (cuz like....CAGED...after g is e). there is a diagram in fretboard logic that shows this pretty clearly, and also shows you where the notes overlap. read it over again. and yeah it keeps repeating.

what key your in is also explained there, just go over it again, it made more sense to me the second time i went over it
#9
Quote by sifon
i got fretboard logic too...

what comes next would be the next shape.

since that looks like the G shape iirc, then right under it is the E shape (cuz like....CAGED...after g is e). there is a diagram in fretboard logic that shows this pretty clearly, and also shows you where the notes overlap. read it over again. and yeah it keeps repeating.

what key your in is also explained there, just go over it again, it made more sense to me the second time i went over it


Ah, thank you!
I was pretty sure that it was, I just wanted to be 100% clear on it.

THANK YOU!
Quote by Guitar0player
You're Thurstonsexual

Happily E-Married to En_zed
The public doesn't want new music; the main thing that it demands of a composer is that he be dead.
-- Arthur Honegger

Enjoy reading? Please crit my work .
#10
I'm another sloppy, self-taught guitarist, who got a lot of help from the Fretboard Logic series.

Unlike systems which number their box patterns, CAGED designates each box by the letter which would represent its root when the box is played with open strings against the nut. Let's say the C box is played this way - when played at the nut, the major scale root is C, therefore it's referred to in CAGED logic as the C box. It connects to the adjacent box pattern which is referred to as the A pattern box, but when followed in that order, you are still playing in the C scale - this could proceed further through boxes G, E, and D, and at the 12th fret, back around to a higher C box (with the root on the 15th fret).

This may not be obvious at first, but when you play the C scale notes against the nut, using only the open notes and the first three frets, you should be able to imagine an extension of a couple of frets to the bass side of the nut. You would be able to play over these imaginary frets the notes which are otherwise played open (in some scales, where certain available, and open notes are not part of the scale, the desired note has to be displaced to the fourth fret instead, but visualize this to the bass side of the nut), and they would perfectly form the C box pattern shown in Fretboard Logic. This visualization may help you understand the lay of the notes in a way which would be useful when you want to do a solo which jumps between the open C box at the nut, and the C scale at the 12th fret.

You ask about memorizing "every note on the fretboard", and I can't presume that those who answer yes have any less experience than I do in playing outside of my own living room (not a lot). I spent years trying to achieve this, and still the best I can do for any fret note which doesn't happen to be the root of some commonly-used bar chord (which I happen to be familiar with) is to compute it from some nearby note which is. In fact, what helped me the most, in familiarizing myself with the fretboard, was to learn the common major and minor chords, and all of their sevenths, in at least four (preferably five) moveable forms, and practice them all in progressions ascending and descending the neck. The group which just wanted to play the three open chords to "You Are My Sunshine" thought it was a bit over the top, and without restraint and judgement this style really could sound awful, but the excercise made me very familiar with these bar chords AND their root notes all over the fretboard.

On bar chords and scale boxes, this is where the beauty of CAGED shines. The diatonic scale system, pentatonic scale system, and the five common moveable chord forms are three groups of five box patterns or chord forms, and each member in each group has a neat one-to-one relationship with another member in the other two. The three of them can be easily superimposed on each other - you may hear a D minor chord being played as the tonal center, or a B minor, but wherever on the neck that you can produce such a chord with the C chord form, in that same space you can play the notes of the C pentatonic or the C diatonic box forms - this form can be used with it's corresponding box pattern from either scale system, anywhere on the neck for any scale beginning with B flat at the nut.