#1
Recently i've been trying to improvise a solo while listening to a bluesy background beat, i find it kind of hard to create a good one on spot, sure if i sat down for an hour i could create a decent solo but i wish to be able to just hit one on spot. So i would like to know some good licks, tips anything that helps with improvising on solos, particually bluesy/rock solos. I already know a lot of scales and some theory but anything that you think could help would be very useful! Thanks in advance,

Jordan
#2
learning licks from your favorite solos will help you because pretty much all solos are just recycled licks put together and so if you learn cool little lines you can put together your own solo pretty easily
#3
Its mostly just experience realy. You just have to keep doin it and eventually you'll get a feel for it. What really helps is playing songs by ear. Develeping your ability to play by ear can work wonders for improvising. Learn a bunch of solos from your favorite artists and steal their licks.
"Good and evil lay side by side as electric love penetrates the sky"
#4
yeah like what guitar ninja said. if you know what sound your guitar is gunna make before you even play it you will be able to express yourself or improv much easier. it will come with experience
#5
The good thing about blues is that it adapts to a wide range of sounds. I started there with cheapo guitars but I only got the feel for it with a Les Paul. Modern mid-priced guitars sound much better than they did then so yeah, just play along to as many tracks as you can and the improvisation will come.
#6
Very few people are able to actually improvise 100% of a solo. The trick is to learn as many riffs and licks as possible, then use them thoughtfully in your solos (but don't use the same ones too often).

And it's always a good idea to have a basic structure in your solos where you keep some parts the same all the time (for each song, not for every song) - then improvise in between those parts.

It's easy to improvise scale runs, and move from one part of the neck to the next - if you know your scales - but it's not always easy to throw in a lot of "advanced" techniques or think of really interesting licks on the fly.
Gear

Gibson '57 Les Paul Reissue
Marshall TSL 601
EHX: Big Muff, Metal Muff, Small Stone, POG, 2880
Ibanez TS808
Voodoo Labs Microvibe
Analogman Chorus
Morley Bad Horsie II
Keeley Compressor (C4)
Nova Delay
MXR 10-band EQ
#7
Play with 3m0shunz lulz an feel da muzac an espress urself an u jst gotta feel it lul, u get wut i meen lulz?



Come on.

Here's my generic repost of how to improvise.

First off, improve your phrasing.

Try to phrase yourself like a singer. Think of it as if you're singing with your guitar. Listen to some singing melodies and try to copy it on your guitar.
To extend on this, alot of blues solo's from way back are just blues guys (son house, robert johnson) trying to play the gospel vocal lines on their guitars but failing in such an awesome way. This is where blues came from.

Next learn 2 or 3 shapes from a pentatonic scale. Try to become good at moving between each shape and try to be able to play 4 or 5 notes on the same string. This will help your phrasing majorly.

When you get good, play over some backing tracks. You should be able to hear the chord progression and hear which notes are stressed (first beat of every bar). On these stressed notes, try to play chord tones of the chord playing.

Also, learn your theory.

You shouldnt be afraid to use other guys licks (like when uncreativity hits), but you shouldn't ever overuse licks. It's unoriginal, cheap and improvisation sounds so much better.
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        L.
#8
Quote by demonofthenight
Play with 3m0shunz lulz an feel da muzac an espress urself an u jst gotta feel it lul, u get wut i meen lulz?


You joke, but it actually is important to at least try to feel what you're playing (or fake it). The audience will tell the difference. It's not a good solo unless you're making a stupid face.

Believe that.

"Play with your ears, not your fingers."
Gear

Gibson '57 Les Paul Reissue
Marshall TSL 601
EHX: Big Muff, Metal Muff, Small Stone, POG, 2880
Ibanez TS808
Voodoo Labs Microvibe
Analogman Chorus
Morley Bad Horsie II
Keeley Compressor (C4)
Nova Delay
MXR 10-band EQ
#9
Quote by Pennderinn
I already know a lot of scales and some theory


Probably not that deeply or much beyond the memorization level.

Straight up blues is the 12 bar, I-IV-V. Learn and master that.

First of all there's "idioms" that are common to blues. These are just the basic licks
almost everyone uses. Memorize some of them and see how they work over the
progression in various spots.

Second, the basical structure you'll likely use is the minor pentatonic.

Third, add to that the chord tones of the three I-IV-V chords. It's helpful to first
learn your shapes of the major triad arpeggios. Then, practice playing only those
notes over the progression.

Fourth, you can expand on all the above with other scales and devices. Major
pentatonics, mixolydian, diminished arpeggios, chromatics....
#10
the blues is a process...the simple chord structure has so many variations and flavors...if your serious..find a player that you like and study how they learned what they listened to...go back as far as you can and see if those influences can teach you something...a three or four note run can be played in many ways by many different players...

learn the "blue notes" (b3, b5, b7,) and altered dominate chords...b9,#9, and 11's...study chromatic and diminished scales, arpeggios and runs, hear how they fit into blues runs and have been used by all the best players of today and have been used by the early pioneers of the art form.

check the miles davis piece - "all blues"...dont let the simplicity fool you...its an amalgam of many blues devices...

play well

wolf
#11
I don't understand why people are saying "very few people can 100% improvise a solo"

uhh... ok?

figure out what key the song is in, use a blues scale that fits in that key.
#12
Now this is the area of my expertise.

Erm... Learn the scale all over the fretboard first. And make sure you can just go through it without stopping and thinking about it. A bit o' basic theory here helps too.
Make sure you can do it in every key.

After that, just give it the bluesy type o' feel when you play. Slide, Bend and just go from note to note. Try some double notes, double bends and etc.

Just practise... s'all you can do.
May the Force be with You.
Carmel is hawt
#13
Quote by Pennderinn
Recently i've been trying to improvise a solo while listening to a bluesy background beat, i find it kind of hard to create a good one on spot, sure if i sat down for an hour i could create a decent solo but i wish to be able to just hit one on spot. So i would like to know some good licks, tips anything that helps with improvising on solos, particually bluesy/rock solos. I already know a lot of scales and some theory but anything that you think could help would be very useful! Thanks in advance,

Jordan


Learn Solos....... lots of them. If you specifically want to sound bluesy, learn blues solos.

learn them
memorize them
play them
study them (what scale, chords.....ect)
enjoy them

Then, after you've spent enough time "Cutting your teeth ", come back to improvisation.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 19, 2008,
#14
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
I don't understand why people are saying "very few people can 100% improvise a solo"

uhh... ok?

figure out what key the song is in, use a blues scale that fits in that key.


Some people have higher standards than others...

An improvised solo will never be as good as a composed solo, and even when you "improvise", odds are that you're going to use licks and tricks that you've already used or heard before.

And, once you've "improvised" a solo to a song once, it's not very likely that you'll play a completely different solo the next time you play the song. You'll just keep improving upon the solo that you already have in your head.
Gear

Gibson '57 Les Paul Reissue
Marshall TSL 601
EHX: Big Muff, Metal Muff, Small Stone, POG, 2880
Ibanez TS808
Voodoo Labs Microvibe
Analogman Chorus
Morley Bad Horsie II
Keeley Compressor (C4)
Nova Delay
MXR 10-band EQ
Last edited by Guitartist at Dec 23, 2008,
#15
^ "never be as good" is entirely meaningless. The solos I like best are almost
always improvised.

Every time I play am improvised solo, it's completely different. It might be some
stylistic elements are similar, or not. And that's usually what I hear in other
improvisors.

I'd say your comments are completely subjective and wrong.