#1
OK I guess it's kinda a lost cause asking this question considering I've already bought wood for a set-in neck I'll be putting in a project (I'll be leaving for a holiday in a few days where I was gonna do most of the work, but the wood's not gonna be here in time ), and I was wondering whether quartersawn or flatsawn wood is better for a neck (I got flatsawn BTW).

I've heard that a quatersawn neck is much more structurally stable than aflatsawn neck, but that due to the grain structure it can warp by twisting or some **** (I have no idea, I'm just throwing out words ). I've also heard that a flatsawn neck isn't as stable, but if the neck is made well then it should be fine.

I'm basically asking this out of curiosity, because I'm still gonna use the wood that I get on this project, and if it warps or anything, w/e; I'll just try to salvage the fretboard and other hardware in the neck and put it all on a new neck.

Many thanks
#2
Quarter sawn is best yeah

flat sawn is fine but you should probably laminate it up.


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#3
quarter sawn is best but in order to obtain it, you have to waste more wood, therefore, it's more expensive.

EDIT: just checked and quater-sawn timber is 25% stronger than slab-sawn wood.
Last edited by TheSecondRaid at Dec 19, 2008,
#4
quarter sawn is cut from the middle towards the outside giving it a nice straight grain and more strength, while slab cut is cut anywhere on the slab of wood which gives it curvy grain and less strength, although both are used for necks quarter sawn is the best
#6
cut it into 3 pieces, flip them 90 degrees, glue them back together. flat sawn cut, turned and laminated has more strength than quarter sawn.
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#8
Quote by nuthinbuttrubl8
cut it into 3 pieces, flip them 90 degrees, glue them back together. flat sawn cut, turned and laminated has more strength than quarter sawn.

I've always wondered how you do that, i was going to do that on my guitar but i didn't know how
#9
Quote by guitarcam123
I've always wondered how you do that, i was going to do that on my guitar but i didn't know how


I'd say you need a bandsaw and (unless you have a really steady hand), a thicknesser to ensure all the surfaces are flat before you glue them together.

I've got a while to think about what I'm gonna do because I'm not gonna be able to work with the neck for a couple of weeks, so w/e. I'm probably not gonna have access to a bandsaw or a planer, just a jigsaw, and I'm not sure I want to risk ruining what could be a decent piece of wood.

If the flatsawn wood is used as is, without being laminated, I'm assuming the worst thing that could happen is that the wood could warp. I'm assuming the truss rod would prevent it from snapping. Is that right? Because if I ever had trouble with it, I could just rip it out and try again
#10
what I do is I run the piece over my jointer to make sure it's straight then run it through my planer to make sure it's parallel then I'll just sand the marks out with some 180 grit, cut the board into 3 pieces using either my bandsaw or my table saw (depending on how much extra wood i have), flip, glue and clamp. once it's dry, i'll joint/plane it again and have a nice laminated 3 piece chunk of gluey goodness
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#11
Speaking of a joiner, a biscuit joiner wouldn't work for this, would it?
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#12
no. biscuit jointers cut the little slot in the side of a piece of wood for a biscuit.



a closer tool to a jointer would be a power hand planer but even that is far from the real thing.
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#13
Quote by nuthinbuttrubl8
cut it into 3 pieces, flip them 90 degrees, glue them back together. flat sawn cut, turned and laminated has more strength than quarter sawn.



do this, but after flipping all 90 degrees, flip the middle one 180 degrees so you get opposite-grain, aka your neck will be invincible.
#14
kryptonite necks ftw
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