#1
Hello people,

I've been figuring out this chord name for a while but since I'm not so good at naming chords (I'm practising hard however) I'm gonna ask you guys here.

It's the following:

e---0---| (So that makes the notes e,e,a,c#,b,e)
B---0---|
G---6---|
D---7---|
A---7---|
E---0---|


It's should be in the key of E. So I'm guessing it's like an E/ something here or Eadd?
Or am I totally wrong here?

And what if I move this C# note 1 whole step up, so that it becomes a D#?
What should it be then?

e---0---| (So that makes the notes e,e,a,d#,b,e)
B---0---|
G---8---|
D---7---|
A---7---|
E---0---|


Do you guys also have any suggestions in learning how to approach these chords. Like in steps or something? I know the basics (how major/minor etc. chords are built out of the major/minor etc. scales) But when you change one or two notes I'm getting confused.

Thanks in advance
#2
I would call the 1st one E6sus4, and the 2nd one where you move the 6th fret to 8th fret I would call EM7sus4.

I would say to look in depth at the major scale and intervals. The naming of different parts of chords all comes from their relationship within the major scale. Taking your examples above in the key of E, look at the E major scale, the notes E F# G# A B C# D#. Looking at your first chord the notes you have are E A B C#, so relating these to the E major scale you have the intervals 1, 4, 5 and 6. The just learning a bit of chord theory teaches you how give a name (or multiple names) to this set of intervals. So the first chord has a 1, 4, 5 and 6 so it becomes E6sus4.
Last edited by Helpy Helperton at Dec 19, 2008,
#3
This may come in handy for you.
http://all-guitar-chords.com/chord_name.php
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#4
you have are E A B C#, so relating these to the E major scale you have the intervals 1, 4, 5 and 6. The just learning a bit of chord theory teaches you how give a name (or multiple names) to this set of intervals. So the first chord has a 1, 4, 5 and 6 so it becomes E6sus4.


I understand. But I'm still confused about why it's E6 and not like Esus4sus6 or something? And where does the additive -sus come from?

Thanks for the help
#6
Alkalineweeman, I discovered that with the programme, if I mute the b string it becomes an A major chord. Which is obviously true because of the fact when a play both positions they sound the same...

Hmm, I think I'm starting to get this thing
#7
sus stands for suspend. It is used because the chord has suspended the use of the III (in this case g#)and replaced it with the IV (a). You can replace the III with either the II (sus2) or the IV (sus4). As the III has already been suspended in this chord you can't suspend it twice i.e. Esus4sus6 and it isn't common practice to use anything other than sus2 or sus4. I think.....
#9
I think Aadd/E works, but don't understand how you came to Amaj7sus4 as the IV is surely augmented (d#) if you base the chord on the A major scale and the VII (g#) isn't even used.
#10
Ok. So -sus is for suspending, in other words; replacing a note of the chord
And add is for adding (or add-on?), in other words; adding a note to the chord.

But can't I just call it an Amajor chord if I mute the b string


e---0---| (So that makes the notes e,e,a,c#,x,e)
B---x---|
G---6---|
D---7---|
A---7---|
E---0---|


Like this?
#11
That would be Amaj/E, as E would be the bass note. Sorry I could write a lot more in response if I wasn't in work with my boss lurking around.

Question for you though, does that chord still give you the same sound as the other? or are you starting to change your chords so they are easier to write. There is a really good lesson on this site somewhere on Major scale and chord theory, I'll try to find it. I was where you are now a few months ago, which shows that with a littel work you can start to get this stuff down relatively quickly.
#13
If you mute the b string it is an Amaj but as the bass note isn't the root note it is common practice to write it as Amaj/E or just A/E as maj is usually removed. Sus is only used when replacing the III note with the II or IV note. I think that add is used when adding a note to a triad when the note is above the octave i.e. IX, XI or XIII note (the most common triad would be the major triad which consists of the I,III and V notes in a scale). If you add the IX note to a chord and omit the V note and also add the VII note I think it just becomes (instead of Aadd9) A9.

There are some good lessons on this site which deal with chord structure so have a look at them. I'm still learning myself so I'm not 100% sure if what I have described is completely true.
#14
Quote by Thomaso
Ok. So -sus is for suspending, in other words; replacing a note of the chord
And add is for adding (or add-on?), in other words; adding a note to the chord.

But can't I just call it an Amajor chord if I mute the b string


e---0---| (So that makes the notes e,e,a,c#,x,e)
B---x---|
G---6---|
D---7---|
A---7---|
E---0---|


Like this?


Suspending works only for thirds. If you replace it with a second, it becomes sus2, if with fourth, it becomes sus4 (or just sus). Adding works with chords which would normally be full 9th, 11th, 13th chords, but don't have the 7th interval.
Last edited by UNIe at Dec 19, 2008,
#15
Right thanks for all the help here, much appreciate it. I'm beginning to understand where all this -add en -sus things are coming from. That Amajor chord that I was suggesting is off course with an E note in the bass so it should be Amaj/E or just A/E. I should really go and look for those lesson on major scales and chord theory here on UG since you advise me to do so.

And as reply to Helpy Helperton (by the way; thanks for putting yourself at risk for answering my question, haha, much appreciate it)

Question for you though, does that chord still give you the same sound as the other? or are you starting to change your chords so they are easier to write.


When I'm playing the 2 chords (the one with the muted b string and just a regular Amajor chord) they sound the same for me. Allthough one eventually has the E in the bass. And yes, I was starting to change my chords to make naming easier but only to learn from it. And to see if I was right by stating that it would then be an Amajor/E chord
#16
^ yeah, I would call that first chord Aadd9. Basically, when naming chords it helps to look for a triad within them, rather than trying to work off the lowest note. I would

Sus means that the 3rd of the chord is replaced with a 4th or a 2nd. It's quite specific.

Add means a tone is added, so an Aadd9 chord is an A chord "add" a 9th (that's the same as 2nd, but in a higher octave) - a 9th from A is B. That's your first chord.

Your second chord is slighly more ambiguous. Probably the best way to call it for now is EM7sus4. E major seven with the 3rd replaced by a 4th.
#17
Quote by Freepower
^ yeah, I would call that first chord Aadd9. Basically, when naming chords it helps to look for a triad within them, rather than trying to work off the lowest note. I would

Sus means that the 3rd of the chord is replaced with a 4th or a 2nd. It's quite specific.

Add means a tone is added, so an Aadd9 chord is an A chord "add" a 9th (that's the same as 2nd, but in a higher octave) - a 9th from A is B. That's your first chord.

Your second chord is slighly more ambiguous. Probably the best way to call it for now is EM7sus4. E major seven with the 3rd replaced by a 4th.


This.

Almost.

It's Aadd9 (2nd inversion). This is important, cause if u don't write this, then in some harmonical situations ur root's with clash with the bass.

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