#1
Sorry if there was another thread. I did a quick search and didn't find anything. If there is, I'll delete this.

On to the main show-

After years of suing thousands of people for allegedly stealing music via the Internet, the recording industry is set to drop its legal assault as it searches for more effective ways to combat online music piracy.

The decision represents an abrupt shift of strategy for the industry, which has opened legal proceedings against about 35,000 people since 2003. Critics say the legal offensive ultimately did little to stem the tide of illegally downloaded music. And it created a public-relations disaster for the industry, whose lawsuits targeted, among others, several single mothers, a dead person and a 13-year-old girl. Instead, the Recording Industry Association of America said it plans to try an approach that relies on the cooperation of Internet-service providers. The trade group said it has hashed out preliminary agreements with major ISPs under which it will send an email to the provider when it finds a provider's customers making music available online for others to take.

Depending on the agreement, the ISP will either forward the note to customers, or alert customers that they appear to be uploading music illegally, and ask them to stop. If the customers continue the file-sharing, they will get one or two more emails, perhaps accompanied by slower service from the provider. Finally, the ISP may cut off their access altogether.

The RIAA said it has agreements in principle with some ISPs, but declined to say which ones. But ISPs, which are increasingly cutting content deals of their own with entertainment companies, may have more incentive to work with the music labels now than in previous years.

The new approach dispenses with one of the most contentious parts of the lawsuit strategy, which involved filing lawsuits requiring ISPs to disclose the identities of file sharers. Under the new strategy, the RIAA would forward its emails to the ISPs without demanding to know the customers' identity.

Though the industry group is reserving the right to sue people who are particularly heavy file sharers, or who ignore repeated warnings, it expects its lawsuits to decline to a trickle. The group stopped filing mass lawsuits early this fall.

It isn't clear that the new strategy will work or how effective the collaboration with the ISPs will be. "There isn't any silver-bullet anti-piracy solution," said Eric Garland, president of BigChampagne LLC, a piracy consulting company.

Mr. Garland said he likes the idea of a solution that works more with consumers. In the years since the RIAA began its mass legal action, "It has become abundantly clear that the carrot is far more important than the stick." Indeed, many in the music industry felt the lawsuits had outlived their usefulness.

"I'd give them credit for stopping what they've already been doing because it's been so destructive," said Brian Toder, who represents a Minnesota mother involved in a high-profile file-sharing case. But his client isn't off the hook. The RIAA said it plans to continue with outstanding lawsuits.

Over the summer, New York State Attorney General Andrew Cuomo began brokering an agreement between the recording industry and the ISPs that would address both sides' piracy concerns. "We wanted to end the litigation," said Steven Cohen, Mr. Cuomo's chief of staff. "It's not helpful."

As the RIAA worked to cut deals with individual ISPs, Mr. Cuomo's office started working on a broader plan under which major ISPs would agree to work to prevent illegal file-sharing.

The RIAA believes the new strategy will reach more people, which itself is a deterrent. "Part of the issue with infringement is for people to be aware that their actions are not anonymous," said Mitch Bainwol, the group's chairman.

Mr. Bainwol said that while he thought the litigation had been effective in some regards, new methods were now available to the industry. "Over the course of five years, the marketplace has changed," he said in an interview. Litigation, he said, was successful in raising the public's awareness that file-sharing is illegal, but now he wants to try a strategy he thinks could prove more successful.

The RIAA says piracy would have been even worse without the lawsuits. Citing data from consulting firm NPD Group Inc., the industry says the percentage of Internet users who download music over the Internet has remained fairly constant, hovering around 19% over the past few years. However, the volume of music files shared over the Internet has grown steadily.

Meanwhile, music sales continue to fall. In 2003, the industry sold 656 million albums. In 2007, the number fell to 500 million CDs and digital albums, plus 844 million paid individual song downloads -- hardly enough to make up the decline in album sales.


http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122966038836021137.html?mod=rss_whats_news_technology

Discuss.
*-)
Quote by Bob_Sacamano
i kinda wish we all had a penis and vagina instead of buttholes

i mean no offense to buttholes and poop or anything

Rest in Peace, Troy Davis and Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis and Eric Garner and Mike Brown
#3
The decision represents an abrupt shift of strategy for the industry, which has opened legal proceedings against about 35,000 people since 2003. Critics say the legal offensive ultimately did little to stem the tide of illegally downloaded music.


Well, they've come to their senses then. Obviously, it wouldn't make any difference anyway.

And it created a public-relations disaster for the industry, whose lawsuits targeted, among others, several single mothers, a dead person and a 13-year-old girl.




Anyway, so much for Rapidshare..
#5
Quote by alkalineweeman
Yeah there was another thread about an hour ago.
Can you link me up? I just did a more in depth search and didn't find it
*-)
Quote by Bob_Sacamano
i kinda wish we all had a penis and vagina instead of buttholes

i mean no offense to buttholes and poop or anything

Rest in Peace, Troy Davis and Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis and Eric Garner and Mike Brown
#6
Quote by element4433
Can you link me up? I just did a more in depth search and didn't find it

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1025475
It ended up as a weird pirate thread
Originally Posted by Chromeproguitar
they make horrible noises in the middle of the night (is it sex?)

Quote by CliffIsAngry
I guess she's pretty hot if you're into that "having a good music video, but not better than Beyonce's" kind of thing...
#7
About time.

NOTHING HURTS BATMAN!

Quote by dannay
what this man says is correct.


Quote by clemm
WHAT IS THE PIT!?!?!!!!!!?!??
--clemm

n00b
#9
Is the RIAA aware that it's pretty much the laughingstock of it's own industry?

Anyway, this is better, but still, I think they should just drop it and accept the fact that pirates are making a comeback in the world today!
Quote by AAAAAAAAAARGH
Gold/Silver/Crystal.

Simply because I could breed the pokemon, and act out my sick sexual fantasies between Dittos and Chanseys.


Quote by bequickorbedead
She had sex..with my...AIDS?
#10
Quote by alkalineweeman
Yeah, I won't delete this unless a mod has a problem with it.
*-)
Quote by Bob_Sacamano
i kinda wish we all had a penis and vagina instead of buttholes

i mean no offense to buttholes and poop or anything

Rest in Peace, Troy Davis and Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis and Eric Garner and Mike Brown
#11
Here's a very interesting article I came across.

With the major record labels on the brink of extinction, Warner Music Group CEO Edgar Bronfman has made a shocking confession. Bronfman told a group of mobile phone executives that the music industry was “wrong to go to war with consumers”.

From his remarks, it’s clear that Bronfman isn’t just talking about the RIAA’s plan to sue consumers into submission. He’s also talking about the opportunity the industry missed when it failed to embrace digital distribution and develop new business models in response to consumer demand:


“We used to fool ourselves,’ he said. “We used to think our content was perfect just exactly as it was. We expected our business would remain blissfully unaffected even as the world of interactivity, constant connection, and file sharing was exploding. And of course, we were wrong. How were we wrong? By standing still or moving at a glacial pace, we inadvertently went to war with consumers by denying them what they wanted and could otherwise find, and as a result, of course, consumers won.”

Unfortunately, Bronfman’s epiphany comes a few years too late to be of use to anyone in the industry.

From the 78, to the LP, to the CD, history demonstrates that each new technological advancement has lead to an increase in profits for the music business. The transition to digital music distribution should have been the ultimate evolution of the business.

The advantages of digital distribution are many — zero manufacturing costs, a chance to develop a more direct relationship with consumers, elimination of the inefficiencies associated with manufacturing and shipping of physical media. It’s a recipe for a very profitable business. A profitable business that the major labels apparently wanted no part of.

For any number of reason, the recording industry chose to fight consumer demand and resist the march of progress (and profits). As Bronfman notes, the industry failed to see consumer interest in p2p file sharing as a proof of concept for digital distribution. Instead of working with tech companies to build a viable business model for the future, they called their lawyers and initiated a series of never ending lawsuits.

Sure, the labels had the moral high ground — consumers pirates were clearly stealing music. The problem is, the moral high ground isn’t always worth much. Something tells me the average music business executive would rather be rich than morally superior. In this case, the moral high ground was an excuse to fight the uncertainty of the future.

Instead of fighting the inevitable, the labels should have embraced the opportunity to give consumers what they want: easy access to affordably priced DRM-free content, in a convenient format that plays on any platform.
#12
The RIAA should be the one that is under the gun .they just sit back with there hand's out and taking from the bands that worked there ass off to get where they are ,and now they shoot every one that has taken a song and clame money that should be going to the bads any way,i think that they are getting paid for a job that means jack crap.if they where so smart they would know that this has been going on ever since the recorder came out and it will keep going on and it will never stop . word to mouth is what put alot of these band into the main stream any ways .so tell me what do they do any damn ways.
#13
My damn college took away my internet last year because I was downloading...but when I get home I'm gonna do it anyway..
Her friends are gazing on her,
And on her gaudy bier,
And weep!-oh! to dishonor
Dead beauty with a tear!
They loved her for her wealth-
And they hated her for her pride-
But she grew in feeble health,
And they love her-that she died.
#14
of course I thunk one of the main reasons this happened was because the RIAA was losing more suits than they where winning.
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