#1
I just started to play guitar a few days ago and have an Epiphone PR-150. I'm learnig from video lessons (Metal Method if you guys have heard of it) and for one of the earlier exercises I solely use the high E string. When I do this though, my A string starts vitrating and it gets quite annoying. I can mute it with something but I just want to know if this is supposed to be happening in the first place.

Also, I have the stock strings and I'm wonderig if I should order some new ones, perhaps ones of a lower guage. Would it matter this early since I'm only learning?
Last edited by Limitless at Dec 19, 2008,
#2
What gauge strings are on it now?
Agile AL-3000 Cherry Sunburst
Fender American Strat HSS
1981 Yamaha FG-335II
Crate V1512 (USA made)
Fender Frontman 15R
Dunlop Crybaby Slash Wah
MXR EVH Phase 90
Ibanez TS9 w/ Keeley Baked Mod
Boss SD-1
Boss DD-3
#4
Are you sure it's not just you hitting the string? You could try putting on a new set of strings, try some 11's if you do, might be easier for a beginner to play on anyway.
Agile AL-3000 Cherry Sunburst
Fender American Strat HSS
1981 Yamaha FG-335II
Crate V1512 (USA made)
Fender Frontman 15R
Dunlop Crybaby Slash Wah
MXR EVH Phase 90
Ibanez TS9 w/ Keeley Baked Mod
Boss SD-1
Boss DD-3
#5
I'm sorry, I titled it wrong. This is how you know that I am new. I am strumming the high E string and not the B string but the A string is vibrating. I'll change that no. Also I'm positive that I'm hitting only the high E string.
#6
The A might be vibrating on the fretboard, which means you need to raise the action, or take it to a tech that can do it for you.
Agile AL-3000 Cherry Sunburst
Fender American Strat HSS
1981 Yamaha FG-335II
Crate V1512 (USA made)
Fender Frontman 15R
Dunlop Crybaby Slash Wah
MXR EVH Phase 90
Ibanez TS9 w/ Keeley Baked Mod
Boss SD-1
Boss DD-3
#7
It's nothing to worry about, all well tuned guitars do this. It's call harmonic resonance, and is a normal phenomenon of stringed instruments. Here's an easy test for you to prove that this is what's happening. Put your guitar on a stand, or lean it up against something with the strings facing out. Turn on the radio and turn up the volume. Now take a close look at the different strings. Don't touch them, just observe them. If you can get a close enough look, you'll see that they are vibrating. During the different bits in the song that's playing through the radio speaker, the guitar's open string notes are being played, creating a resonant frequency inside your acoustic guitar. These frequencies coincide perfectly with all 6 of your strings at various times throughout the song, thus making your guitar start to ring out, all on it's own. So, when you are playing away on your high E string, there will be times when you hit certain notes that coincide with the open A string, causing it to start to vibrate. If it's bothersome, learn how to mute. If you can live with it, let it be, let it be, let it be.
#8
Quote by LeftyDave
It's nothing to worry about, all well tuned guitars do this. It's call harmonic resonance, and is a normal phenomenon of stringed instruments. Here's an easy test for you to prove that this is what's happening. Put your guitar on a stand, or lean it up against something with the strings facing out. Turn on the radio and turn up the volume. Now take a close look at the different strings. Don't touch them, just observe them. If you can get a close enough look, you'll see that they are vibrating. During the different bits in the song that's playing through the radio speaker, the guitar's open string notes are being played, creating a resonant frequency inside your acoustic guitar. These frequencies coincide perfectly with all 6 of your strings at various times throughout the song, thus making your guitar start to ring out, all on it's own. So, when you are playing away on your high E string, there will be times when you hit certain notes that coincide with the open A string, causing it to start to vibrate. If it's bothersome, learn how to mute. If you can live with it, let it be, let it be, let it be.



...whispered words of wisdom...let it be.
#9
Quote by LeftyDave
It's nothing to worry about, all well tuned guitars do this. It's call harmonic resonance, and is a normal phenomenon of stringed instruments. Here's an easy test for you to prove that this is what's happening. Put your guitar on a stand, or lean it up against something with the strings facing out. Turn on the radio and turn up the volume. Now take a close look at the different strings. Don't touch them, just observe them. If you can get a close enough look, you'll see that they are vibrating. During the different bits in the song that's playing through the radio speaker, the guitar's open string notes are being played, creating a resonant frequency inside your acoustic guitar. These frequencies coincide perfectly with all 6 of your strings at various times throughout the song, thus making your guitar start to ring out, all on it's own. So, when you are playing away on your high E string, there will be times when you hit certain notes that coincide with the open A string, causing it to start to vibrate. If it's bothersome, learn how to mute. If you can live with it, let it be, let it be, let it be.


Hmm, I see, I thought that this was the cause but didn't know if my guitar alone was set up wrong to allow this or if was just present no matter how it was tuned/set up. Thanks.