#1
Okay so I understand the intervals. Only i'm not too sure about 1 thing.

This is a perfect 5th interval:

D|----7-
A|-5----
E|-------

How do you call this:

D|------
A|-5----
E|----5-
If you take the D on the A string as the root, I'd say an inverted 5th(or a 5th an octave lower), but you could also say it's a perfect fourth.


So if someone would tell me; "Go down a minor 2nd", does he mean example A or B?

*A* (You could see this as a maj7th (an octave lower), if u take the G note as the root.)
D|-5-4---
A|--------
E|--------
(Up a min2nd is 1 semitone up, so can you also see it as a min 2nd if u go 1 semitone down?)


*B* (is the min2nd interval if u take the G note as the root, but an octave lower)
D|-5----
A|-------
E|----4--

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Dec 20, 2008,
#2
It's called an inverted fourth.

And if someone says, down a minor second or down a semitone (far more appropriate) he means instead of playing a C you play a B.
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#3
Quote by demonofthenight
It's called an inverted fourth.

And if someone says, down a minor second or down a semitone (far more appropriate) he means instead of playing a C you play a B.


Ah okey tyvm

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#4
An interval is the distance between two notes starting from the first played so
D|------
A|5-----
E|--5---

is a perfect 4th.

Always take the first note as the root. Down a minor 2nd is B to A going down

D|5-4---- is a minor 2nd

Hope this was helpful
#5
Quote by xxdarrenxx
How do you call this:

D|------
A|-5----
E|----5-
If you take the D on the A string as the root, I'd say an inverted 5th(or a 5th an octave lower), but you could also say it's a perfect fourth.


That's right. It's an A and a D. The D, being in the higher register is a perfect fourth above the A. This means the A is also a perfect fourth below D. There is nothing "inverted" about the fourth. It is a perfect fourth interval. ( The inversion of a perfect fourth is a perfect fifth. That interval is not a perfect fifth, not seven semitones therefore not an inverted perfect fourth. It is simply a perfect fourth.)

However a perfect fifth and perfect fourth are inversions of each other. Meaning A up to D is a perfect fourth. D up to A is a perfect fifth.

Similarly, going down. D down to A is a perfect fourth. A down to D is a perfect fifth.

You could call it an inverted prefect fifth. Or you could call it a perfect fourth. I think the difference is your reference note. However even in the case of the reference note being the A it could be called a perfect fourth down. The down being an important appendix.

If you think of intervals as a set number of semitones where a perfect fifth = 7 semitones, when someone attaches the appendix down they mean descend from the starting note to the note 7 semitones below.

Hence,
a perfect fifth above A is E and a perfect fifth below A is D.
a perfect fourth above A is D and a perfect fourth below A is E.

This is why they are inversions of each other.
Si
#7
Here is an easy way to figure out the inversions of intervals if you don't already know:


9 - the beginning interval = the inversion.

major -} minor
minor -} major
perfect -} perfect
(double) augmented -} (double) diminished
(double) diminished -} (double) augmented
tritone -} tritone

example:
D Major 3rd (D/F#)
9-3=6
major -} minor
D Major 3rd = F# Minor 6th
#9
Quote by Freepower
Quickie answer - an interval is the distance between notes


Not exactly, since we use ordinal counting with (not from) the reference note.
Last edited by Dodeka at Dec 20, 2008,