#1
Basically, I'm new to the whole recording process and so I was wondering - is there a certain type of microphone I should look into getting? At the moment I'm not so bothered about quality as I'm a newbie and as for my budget, I would spend about £200. If there aren't really any for that price, please put down suggestions, thanks.
#2
look into a cad 7-peice drum set on ebay. they are only like 200 american dollars and i love them. You also only need 2 stands to use these for the over heads because the rest of the mics clip to the drumset
#4
It depends on what you wanna go for , tough a decent longer range mic should do the trick.
#5
this is in the wrong section, should go in the GG&A, although thats still a Guitar forum, but its about gear...
#7
for that much, go for a kit, you can get them in different price ranges, and it includes everything you need. Buying one mic at a time will surely cost a lot more,
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#8
Quote by blacklabel22333
look into a cad 7-peice drum set on ebay. they are only like 200 american dollars and i love them. You also only need 2 stands to use these for the over heads because the rest of the mics clip to the drumset


Make sure you get the premium, it sounds much better, I have both.
#9
remember to mic the underside of the snare
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#10
Dude, if you have even a half decent room to record in then go for a pair of decent quality small diaphragm condensor mic's.

You will have less mix fleibility, but if you get it right it'l sound **** LOADS better than those crappy cheap drum sets.

7 mic's for £200..**** that for a fiver!
#11
the cad mics are not bad at all. i dont think the samson drum mics in the ame price range are nearly as good as these. Two condensers doesnt let you control the volumes of any perticular drums and you can barley do any editing. The cad kit comes with 2 condensers as well.
#12
Quote by willieturnip
Dude, if you have even a half decent room to record in then go for a pair of decent quality small diaphragm condensor mic's.

You will have less mix fleibility, but if you get it right it'l sound **** LOADS better than those crappy cheap drum sets.

7 mic's for £200..**** that for a fiver!


I'm apt to agree with this guy, this kit doesn't sound like a very great option, but you're a newbie, and don't have any idea what you're doing, so I would say close mic'ing with a kit would be the best option.

You could try to check online at craigslist or something for some condenser mics, and get a Dynamic for the kick though...just an option.
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#13
Shure SM57s are good on snares and toms but for budget mics you could get a pair of Behringer SD condensers and use them overhead.

You could probably find a cheap 7 piece mic set but you would need to spend $400 on an interface such as the PreSonus FP10.

Quote by guitarcam123
this is in the wrong section, should go in the GG&A, although thats still a Guitar forum, but its about gear...


no this is the proper place for this type of question, he is looking to record his drums.
Last edited by moody07747 at Dec 22, 2008,
#14
I use a good budget setup for drums. You can hear it in the covers on my profile for Better Man and Shine and Come Down.

We used:
kick - Sennheiser e602 - $200 CDN (used)
snare - SM57 - $100 CDN (used)
overheads - Behringer ECM8000 (x2) - $70/ea (new)

I don't *think* we used any mics on the toms or anything... pretty sure just the four. The original songs in my profile used a similar setup, only supplemented with an SM58 on the floor tom, a Sennheiser e835 on the two center toms, and an AKG condensor on the hats.

That's really close to your 200 pound budget you quoted. Mind you, Moody raised an important point about needing an interface to plug all those mics into, and needing to factor that into your budget.

As far as miking the underside of the snare... try it. It might or might not be the sound you're looking for. A lot of people mic both the top and bottom of the snare, and reverse the phase on one so they can mix the two together. In recording, it is very much a game of whatever works for you. I've tried it. With that particular drum kit, that particular snare, that particular mic for that particular sound, I didn't like it. Would I try it again? Sure, why not? There are SO many variables.

I DO disagree with the "just fly up a pair of condensors" idea. Again, it depends on the sound you're looking for, but statistically, you're probably looking for a rock drum sound. You won't get it that way. In your face drums need to have the mics up nice and tight. Old rock recordings (as in pre-1965-ish), and most jazz recordings are done with a pair of mics over the kit as overheads. Think of that drum sound. Not a rock sound, is it? It has a very distinct character, and can sound fantastic for those genres, but it does all depend on the application.

CT
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