#1
Okay so I'm fairly new to sweep picking. I've been playing for quite a few years but I've never ventured into sweeps until a few months ago.

Anyway, I have this dilemma. I'm playing an arpeggio that starts by pulling off 17 on the high e to 13, and then 15 on B, 14 on G, 12 on D, and going back up. (Sorry I sort of fail at writing tabs). But what I'm doing that makes me feel like I'm cheating is, once I pull of from the 17, I don't pick any of the other notes going down the arpeggio, I just sort of tap them with my left hand while still maintaing the rolling finger motion, but when I'm going back up the arp, I sweep them.

For the notes that I don't actually pick, it still sounds like I'm sweeping them. Doing that makes it unbelievably easier to play the arpeggio faster.

I wanted some feedback as to whether or not that would be considered MASSIVE cheating, and if I should just get over myself and go back to sitting with a metronome, picking the ENTIRE arp instead of half of it (like I have been) at an unbelievably slow tempo, and play it the "right" way. Or do you think that for certain arpeggios, my "method" is somewhat acceptable.

Thanks in advance for any responses.
If my explanation wasn't clear enough, I'm sorry...
#2
Well, there's no such thing as "cheating" in music.

What you're doing is fine, and is actually, imo, much more useful than sweeping, as it allows you to play notes without any need for your right hand to be able to pick them.

Rusty Cooley and Martin Goulding both use the method you describe, but if you want to become truly good at sweeping, it's very useful to be able to do a proper swept upstroke - just like both those guys can.

Or you can do what I like to do and just not bother sweeping any of the notes and hammering them all. If you can keep it clean and loud, then that's fantastic for your left hand technique.
#3
^ epiphany.... i have just realized the error of my ways.....

of course it won't help on an acoustic, but my life has just been made alot easier.
#4
That's what I said when I realised how much was possible with good left hand technique as well. Now my right hand feels neglected.

If you haven't already, check out how Shawn Lane and Allan Holdsworth both run triads all over the neck with nary a pickstroke.
#5
Cool, thank you so much. And yeah that method probably wouldn't work all that great on acoustic, but I haven't broken the acoustic frontier yet for sweep picking anyway xD.

I also realized that I probably shouldn't let that method dominate my sweeping technique, since you can't always use it for certain arpeggios and licks.
#7
When i sweep, if there's more than one note in the same string i just hammer on/pull off/tap the string and it is INDEED faster than picking and give it original sound if done properly on your own style hehe.
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#8
i disagree, i think its important for you to learn to pick the notes, not that there is anything inherently wrong with you not picking them. its just that what happens when you get pulled away from your cushy little high gain amp and you actually have to be able to play these licks and not let the amp do it for you? i just think it is good practice to not be just satisfied with this legato-esque technique and really learn to sweep pick if thats what your trying to do. i am in somewhat of the same boat as Freepower because over the years I have never really worried at all about picking, and when i try to break out of my rock/metal comfort zone i play like a real douche. i am now having to go back and waste my time with ****ty picking exercises that i should be years past. but i am trying to seriously persue guitar to some extent, i guess it really depends on your seriousness and desire for versatility.

sorry for the rant.
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#9
from your cushy little high gain amp and you actually have to be able to play these licks and not let the amp do it for you?


I imagine he would do the same thing. There is no reason it wouldn't sound out properly on an acoustic, or on the clean channel.
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#10
Btw. i learned to do it on my acoustic and i sold my effects to have more cash for my new guitar A LONG TIME AGO, so it still works, maybe your lacking finger strength or something, because, it's fairly easy. Not trying to be a d**k or anything, just trying to point that out :3

And i am REALLY trying to pick those notes, they for now just seem impossible so this is the easy way out for now.

And i don't have a high gain amp, i play on bass amps.
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#13
Quote by TheShred201
Moral of the story--Learn both. They both have different practical applications, and thus you'll be better off being able to do either method equally well.



/thread
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#14
What about the sweeping patterns where you need to barre and roll your finger? I don't think you can do that with just plain hammer-ons.
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#15
u should just do both. there is nothing 'wrong' with ur method, because if it works then its good and if it doesnt hurt u its good. but as above said u should aim to be as versatile as u can, so keep practicing both. my 2c