#1
I'm considering putting EMG pickups in my LP. I've heard EMG pickups in numerous other guitars but don't know if I should alter my prized possesion. Advice?
Proud owner of a Les Paul
#2
if you feel you want to try something different do it

but if not keep the stock pups
Gear:
Fender MIA Strat w/EMG SA's
Fender Super 60
Boss RT-20 Rotary Sim
Ibanez AD-9 Analog Delay
EHX Big Muff

"Doctor Kindly Tell Your Wife
That I'm Alive, Flowers Thrive
Realise, Realise, Realise"
#3
What music do you play?
EMG's in a Les Paul IMO would be a bad idea.
Quote by RevaM1ssP1ss
The 2 best colours EVER pitted against each other? No wai!

I voted lime.

Quote by SeveralSpecies
btw lime kicked ass

Member of the Bass Militia PM Nutter_101 to join
Team Lime Green!
#4
make sure to take into consideration the music you play before you do it.
Quote by musicjunkie207
The time I fell on my face on a trampoline and cracked my neck, then proceded to run around the yard in a blind panic screaming "I hope I'm not paralyzed! OH GOD I THINK I'M PARALYZED!"


#5
don't do it. EMG's will kill the natural tone of a Les Paul. If you want to swap pickups for a more metal sound try some good passives. Maybe a Seymour Duncan JB.
#7
^you definitely don't want EMG's then. Hard rock and 80's metal was mostly done with passive pups I believe. Try looking into either Gibson Burstbuckers or maybe a Seymour Duncan JB/Jazz configuration. the Jazz is nice for cleans and rhythm playing. It has a nice fat sound with a good bottom end. the JB is just a great pickup IMO. It's taken everything I've ever thrown at one.
#8
Cool. Thanks for the suggestions. I think I might give some passive semour duncans a try.
Proud owner of a Les Paul
#9
awesome. I'm pretty sure they'll do a lot better job for you. and you can keep your awesome LP tone.
#10
Ya, thats what I was worried about because I love the tone I get from it. It's so distinct.
Proud owner of a Les Paul
#11
^true that. EMG's definitely are not known for preserving the natural tone of the guitar they are in.
#12
seeing as his question has been answered, and this thread is nice and handy, which pickups would be the best to put in a Fender Squier? (to mod).

I play hard rock such as Soundgarden.
#13
Quote by Clownocaster#1
seeing as his question has been answered, and this thread is nice and handy, which pickups would be the best to put in a Fender Squier? (to mod).

I play hard rock such as Soundgarden.

HSS or SSS?
#14
Quote by ortrigger
HSS or SSS?


HSS.

i've been thinking about getting EMG's, but after your posts i'm not so sure.

i wanna basically save up for the creme de la creme of pickups tho
#15
You'll need an F-spaced bucker so maybe a Seymour Duncan Screamin' Demon? I had one in an old super-strat style guitar and it had a pretty decent sound. George Lynch sig model I believe. and then maybe some Hot Rails in the middle and neck positions?
#16
Quote by ortrigger
You'll need an F-spaced bucker so maybe a Seymour Duncan Screamin' Demon? I had one in an old super-strat style guitar and it had a pretty decent sound. George Lynch sig model I believe. and then maybe some Hot Rails in the middle and neck positions?

God no. Those are only good for high gain. Having one in the neck position I can understand, but what good will it do in the middle?

Clownocaster, what music are you be playing and what amp are you using?
#17
Quote by TheQuailman
God no. Those are only good for high gain. Having one in the neck position I can understand, but what good will it do in the middle?

Clownocaster, what music are you be playing and what amp are you using?


hard and progressive rock such as Porcupine Tree, Tool, Mars Volta and the Deftones, generally.

Through a JCM 800 combo

any ideas?
#18
Quote by lupin50
Ya, thats what I was worried about because I love the tone I get from it. It's so distinct.


If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
UG's AC/DC Lover
#19
zakk wylde plays emgs in les paul's. why not? emg sounds pretty similar in any guitar. the extra bulk and weight would add tons of sustain. if you dont like the stock pups much or if you want a different sound, go for it. i would.
Jackson RR5 ivory w/ EMG 81/85
Jackson DX6 w/ SD Distortion & Dimarzio Super Distortion
Fender Starcaster Sunburst
Mesa/Boogie DC-3
Johnson JT50 Mirage
Ibanez TS-9
Morley Bad Horsie 2
Boss CE-5

ISP Decimator
Boss DD-6
Korg Pitchblack
#20
Quote by Clownocaster#1
hard and progressive rock such as Porcupine Tree, Tool, Mars Volta and the Deftones, generally.

Through a JCM 800 combo

any ideas?

There's a lot of different pickups that would work for that, personally, I'd go for this:

Dimarzio PAF Pro for the bridge position:
http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/DiMarzio-DP151-PAF-Pro-Pickup?sku=302040
It has a 'cutting' sound compared to vintage style humbuckers, but does not sound as sterile as other more modern pickups. It's somewhere in between and therefore very versatile. You may want to check out other pickups like a Duncan '59 if you like lower output and a warmer, vintage oriented sound or the Duncan JB and Duncan Custom for a higher output and more modern sound. But I think the PAF Pro is your best bet.

Don't forget that you will need a humbucker that has the correct pole piece spacing for tremolo equipped guitars, those are called Trem Buckers if they're Duncans (short: STB) and I think they're called F-spaced when talking about Dimarzios, though I'm not 100% sure about the latter, so you'll need to check that if you want Dimarzios.


For the neck position, I'd look at single sized humbuckers. I like them because they are versatile and can handle clean and distorted sounds well (in most cases, at least):
http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/Seymour-Duncan-Little-59er-Pickup?sku=300008
http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/Seymour-Duncan-SCR1-Cool-Rails-Pickup?sku=300160

One thing to do before ordering is checking underneath your guitar's pickguard. Many strats are routed for HSH while they use a HSS pickguard, so you might even install a normal humbucker in the neck position. I prefer the single sized ones for the neck because the sound doesn't get muddy with distortion like it does when using normal humbuckers, but many people like the extra bass response of those. If you want a real humbucker, the Duncan '59 and Duncan Jazz are worth a look:
http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/Seymour-Duncan-SH1-59-Model-4Conductor-Pickup?sku=300011
http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/Seymour-Duncan-SH2N-Jazz-Model-Pickup?sku=300060

For the middle position, you'll need to get something that matches the other pickups output-wise when they're split (more on that later). I think the Duncan SSL-1 will work for that well, but there are dozens of choices here, so I recommend doing some research on that yourself.
http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/Seymour-Duncan-SSL1-Vintage-Staggered-Pickup?sku=300321

Okay, so humbuckers generally have more output than single coils, that's why they are usually split when using them in parallel with a single coil. That means that only one coil of the humbucker is used, which makes it sound and function like a single coil and also lowers the output by 50%. Many pickups on the market can be split, generally, if a humbucker has 4 conductor wiring it can be split, if it only has 2 conductor wiring it can't, so be careful when buying!

Medium to high output pickups should be split, lower output ones don't necessarily need to. If you go for a Duncan '59 or Cool Rails (no matter what position) you won't really need to split them, but if you want the Dimarzio PAF Pro or a Duncan JB or Custom, it is a good idea.

One last thing: There are several versions of the pickups I talked about, each version specifically made for either the bridge, middle or neck position, even though it is not mentioned on musiciansfriend.com. Be sure to make clear what exactly you want when ordering.