#1
How can I start soloing, where can I learn?
I really suck at hammer ons and pulloffs

I can mute/alt pick/ trem pick well enough and do most basic chords but hammer ons and pulloffs are tough for me
pretty much i've learnt all my favorite songs but the solos are screwing me up
I think it is because I am starting with something to hard (Enter Sandman by Metallica, Medusa by Bring Me The horizon, Paranoid by Black Sabbath, Knights of Cydonia by Muse, etc)

Any good free, online lessons, or easier solos I should begin with?

Any tips are greatly appreciated
P.s. I have small hands
it pisses me off


Pretty much in a nutshell my left hand is too slow to solo properly
I can even sweep with the right hand but I can't sync the left hand with right
Last edited by Romal at Dec 20, 2008,
#2
im in the same situation as you bro except i have huge hands lol
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Jarrett Custom Les Paul
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#4
Practice and take your time. Go really slow, note by note. Practice one measure at a time or even half a measure at a time and don't move on to the next section until you get it. Then put it all together. Finding backing tracks of those songs will help so that you only hear yourself and not Kirk Hammett or who ever.

Hammer on's and pull off are very basic techniques. If they don't sound right to you then you need to take to the time to master those in order to do most solo's. Also, bends are very important as well, but overlook those.

Check out Steve Vai's 10 hour workout, I have used some of those exercises to help with my full fretting hand dexterity, stretching & picking hand technique.

Don't worry about the size of your hands. I'm a little guy and I have no problems out playing anyone bigger than, me. If you have the passion for playing the guitar you'll find a way, size doesn't matter.
Imagination is more important than knowledge...
It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education.
- Albert Einstein -
#5
If you're just learning, come back to enter sandman and start out with smells like teen spirit. That will build up your skill and confidence. Then tackle harder solos.
-Andrew H
band: syncopated groove punch
#6
Learn scales and practice with a metronome. Make sure everything stays in time. Start out with whole notes if you have to, work up to quarters, then 8ths, then 16ths. Figure out what sounds good to you and what doesn't. Trial and error is IMHO the best way to figure it out, because you're going to put your own personal stamp on it. Figure out which scales give certain tones and 'feels' that you like and noodle, but do it to a metronome so you're learning to phrase the notes. Playing without a metronome is just goofing, it's good for composing once you've learned to phrase notes but learning to put notes where they belong (or NOT put notes where they don't) is pretty much the key to it.

GL
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#7
If you're just learning, come back to enter sandman and start out with smells like teen spirit. That will build up your skill and confidence. Then tackle harder solos.


That's some great advice right there. Try to find some simple guitar parts in songs you like and learn those.
#8
same problem as you bud. I wish i could get it together , but soloing just kicks my ass all the time lol
#10
Play with your ears instead of scales, They are over rated. Learn scale formulas though. It's also more important to learn phrases. AS I said in an earlier post, Note that don't go together will be very apparent, So practice, trial and error and creativity are what it takes to learn lead guitar. Not scales.
#11
Try an easier solo like Highway to Hell by AC/DC.

And don't big yourself up to much - if you can only "sweep" with your right hand then you can't sweep at all, anybody can strum down the strings with their right hand.

Quote by Initium
Play with your ears instead of scales, They are over rated. Learn scale formulas though. It's also more important to learn phrases. AS I said in an earlier post, Note that don't go together will be very apparent, So practice, trial and error and creativity are what it takes to learn lead guitar. Not scales.

That's rubbish I'm afraid - of course you need to develop and use your ears but recommending trial and error as a method of learning is retarded...music theory is there to be learned for a reason, to help us understand music and avoid everybody having to work bits of stuff out for themselves with no way to reliably communicate their ideas to other musicians or understand the ideas of others.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Dec 21, 2008,
#12
Yeh learn some simple solos like smells like teen spirit by nirvana and wonderful tonight by eric clapton (the little fill bits), then tackle techniques separately, like practice hammer ons and pull offs, and practice fast picking, eventually your skill should go up and when you come to solos in songs they'll be easier!
#13
Quote by steven seagull



That's rubbish I'm afraid - of course you need to develop and use your ears but recommending trial and error as a method of learning is retarded...music theory is there to be learned for a reason, to help us understand music and avoid everybody having to work bits of stuff out for themselves with no way to reliably communicate their ideas to other musicians or understand the ideas of others.



Developing your ears makes learning theory alot easier. I did exactly what I suggested when I first picked the instrument up and was able to advance beyond that of a normal 13 year old. Scales are junk. They teach you nothing. you're better off learning someone else's songs to learn how to fabricate music. Otherwise you just get trapped doing the same things, and it's sounds like a lame piano recitle. Writing music, esspecially complex music, is nothing but trial and error. Esspecially when you do it alone.
#14
wow steven seagulls really nice eh
dont big yourself up to much either bud, im sure your jimmy page
#15
K response to everyone

- Steve Vai's workout, where can I find this? Is it appropriate for my level?
- About scales, I don't take lessons, I'm pretty much teaching myself for the past 6 months or so, what kind of scales do I need to know and how does it help soloing?
- Whats a pentatonic scale? lol
- I'm not trying to big myself when I say I can sweep with my right hand, it's just I've been watching videos and I can actually sweep say a chord on its own but most instructional videos I've seen say that you should sweep each individual note and not have your hands planted to the guitar, that is what I need help with.
- And about this trial and error vs theory debate, and I've been doing trial and error for the past 6 months and it hasn't gotten me anywhere because I need structure in my practicing, so theory is much appreciated

If you can reply to all of these points above, I'll love you forever :p
#16
Well, I hate it when people refer me to other threads, always annoys me.. But, I posted a basic practice structure on a thread a couple places down and I really dont want to retype it all.

The thread was something like "help with minor and major scales" Heres the link:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1024359


Google. for steve Vai's stuff..youtube I'm sure has it.

Pentatonics. Look at the long message I wrote to another kid (on the other thread) if you have questions send me a message and I'll reply

Sweeping doesnt do any good, unless you can play a skeleton solo -Basic pattern. There are much more important things to learn before sweeping mastery matters.

..Sweeping a chord, but not each individual note- That just confuses me.

-Good luck*
- to Make ourselves more than we are
#17
Quote by Initium
Developing your ears makes learning theory alot easier. I did exactly what I suggested when I first picked the instrument up and was able to advance beyond that of a normal 13 year old. Scales are junk. They teach you nothing. you're better off learning someone else's songs to learn how to fabricate music. Otherwise you just get trapped doing the same things, and it's sounds like a lame piano recitle. Writing music, esspecially complex music, is nothing but trial and error. Esspecially when you do it alone.

Scales ARE theory - you can't separate the two.
Actually called Mark!

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#18
Quote by J0hnY

..Sweeping a chord, but not each individual note- That just confuses me.

-Good luck*


Thanks a lot for the help

When I say not each note I mean that most videos I watched said that You shouldn't press down a chord and just sweep it. You should be putting down and removing your fingers every time you sweep each string. That is what I am having trouble with.
#19
Quote by Romal
Thanks a lot for the help

When I say not each note I mean that most videos I watched said that You shouldn't press down a chord and just sweep it. You should be putting down and removing your fingers every time you sweep each string. That is what I am having trouble with.

Forget it for the time being, sweep picking is an advanced technique, try not to confuse it with simply strumming. It's got very little to do with your right hand in isolation, it's all about your left hand dexterity and your ability to use boith hands together.

Seriously just put it out of your mind for the time being, it's not something you're going to be able to learn yet, you need to learn to walk before you can run.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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#21
Still kinda foggy, but hopefully this helps...

play 4 notes or so..could be more i guess- and mute the string right after it is played. You dont have to lift you fingers all the way up (maybe it looks fancy) instead just dont press so hard right after strumming the string. Play it the string then mute it.

Try something like this - with 5 being the pointer on the high e string.

5
6
7
8

Strum that slowly a few times. Then try this: immediately after strumming 8.mute it.7.mute it. after strumming 6 mute it.. ect. Sometimes its nice to let the high e ring at the end instead of muting it.

Hopefully this helps, but for some reason- I doubt it will///
- to Make ourselves more than we are
#22
Justinguitar.com

Has helped me a lot, hopefully will help you too.
#23
Quote by Romal
Alright, so what should I start with?

The basics, concentrate on learning to pick cleanly, accurately and in time for the moment - I already gave you a suggestion for a solo to tackle.

There's no point worrying about sweep picking when your basic technique is lacking...you're probably a year of being at the point where you should be worrying about sweep picking.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#24
Cool, thanks everyone!


edit: My hands are so small
I look at Paul Gilbert and it makes me cry.
Last edited by Romal at Dec 21, 2008,
#25
Find the pick of destiny, and you will rock with the greatest.

But seriously, all I can recommend is just practice, practice, practice.
#26
Quote by steven seagull
Scales ARE theory - you can't separate the two.



Scales are a part of theory, and you can separate them. If you're gonna make it a point to learn them, you're better off learning them after you've figured out how to be creative. But they aren't vital to know. I've always found them to be limiting and that you can sound great without adhering to any of them. Learning the scale formulas may be alot more helpful than knowing the exact scales themselves.
#27
Quote by Romal
Cool, thanks everyone!


edit: My hands are so small
I look at Paul Gilbert and it makes me cry.

Don't worry about the size of your hands. As long as you practice and get yourself comfortable with the instrument, the size of your hands won't be a factor. Just practice and get yourself a metronome ASAP (or www.metronomeonline.com if you can't afford one). Honestly, that's probably one of the biggest things that's improved my technique, aside from playing with other musicians. Being able to keep a beat and phrase notes is key no matter what you're doing on guitar. You can play the most blazing, intense run ever but if you aren't doing it in time in a specific cadence it's just noise.
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play
#28
Quote by Initium
Scales are a part of theory, and you can separate them. If you're gonna make it a point to learn them, you're better off learning them after you've figured out how to be creative. But they aren't vital to know. I've always found them to be limiting and that you can sound great without adhering to any of them. Learning the scale formulas may be alot more helpful than knowing the exact scales themselves.

Erm, no. Birdman's right. Scales are theory. It's like saying "arithmatic isn't math". It's downright silly to even suggest.

And learning scale formulas is the same thing as learning scales. In fact, it is learning scales, the proper way, as opposed to just learning boxes.
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play
Last edited by Garou1911 at Dec 21, 2008,
#29
how to solo-

1. turn off everything that is making noise in your house
2. plug up your guitar
3. play anything
4. you just soloed


i hate how the term "soloing" is used now, if its a solo your all thats playing (is my interpretation)
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#30
If you want to solo well, you will have to learn your scales, music theory, learn keeping time, use various techniques in soloing (basics - hammeron/pulloff, slide; advanced - sweeping,. pinch harmonics, etc.), so on.

I've been practicing scales for a few months now and I'm getting better at this whole soloing thing. I figure in about a year if I go the right way, I should be pretty decent.
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#31
Quote by fagelamusgtr
If you're just learning, come back to enter sandman and start out with smells like teen spirit. That will build up your skill and confidence. Then tackle harder solos.



deff this. ive been determined to learn all the TBDM's songs, but i cant shred or sweep...at all. so i found some of thier songs with eaiser solos, and knowing them and the riffs associated with them helped me learn alot more then to learn **** i had no chance of playing for now. the more you learn, the more you want to learn, the better you get, imo.
#32
i would suggest stuff buy randy rhoads, hammer ons and pull offs were his bread and butter, he had small hands so his stuff is geared for that, i would suggest crazy train