#1
Im getting my feet wet with recording and I am loving it so far. I only have Cubase and a single crappy dynamic mic but I am planning on upgrading to better mics and interfaces as time goes by. For some practice, I asked my friend, who has acoustic and electric guitars, a bass, and an electric drum set, if I could record anything for him. He said he wanted to do a couple of covers and the first one were going to try and record is Dani California from Red Hot Chili Peppers. Now, how would I go about recording it? I am thinking of having him play a scatch track on guitar and then we record the drums, bass, and so on. Is there any other way I should do this?

Also, on my recordings so far, I will have a click track going while I am play. Now, the first track I record is clean but when I record another track you can clearly hear the sound of the click track on playback, its a little faint but you can hear fine. Does anybody know how to fix this problem? I am thinking this will screw up the cover of Dani California so any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.
"My strength is my determination" - Randy Rhoads (1956-1982)

Quote by LedZeppelin
Life is not an isolated moment, so don't live it as such.

Quote by bendystraw
art rock? isn't all rock art?
Last edited by HedBanger24/7 at Dec 21, 2008,
#2
the way i've known to do it, is by recording:

1.Drums = Help everything else stay in time, as they're pretty much the metronome, make sure you get someone to just play a guitar track with it, to ensure that the drums are correct with the song, once the drums are down, then overdub the guitar, with a new correct version of guitar.
2.Bass, or Guitar
3.Lead = So you can easily over-dub mistakes
4.Vocals = Like the lead, to over-dub, to make sure it sounds perfect.
#3
About the click track, do you record it in the same room that you mix in? Maybe the mic is picking up the click. If not then check your routing on your tracks. You might be recording from the output rather than the input.
#4
With the routing in Cubase, it is actually almost difficult to 'accidentally' record the output of one track to the input of another.

The click must be getting picked up by the mic, I would guess. A basic rule of thumb is that, "if you can hear it in the room, you can hear it in the mics." The way to avoid this is to use headphones. Go for closed-back phones to minimize bleed into the mics, and don't crank it any louder than you need to.

Recording the scratch track with guitar and vocal would be fine for helping a drummer stay in place while he/she records the drum parts. Your best results will be if you use that click to ensure that the guitar/vocal part is perfectly in time. That way, the drummer won't be as apt to sound like he/she is following, rather than leading. Have a count in on that scratch track so that the drummer can start at the same time as the scratch track.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
Interesting -- i always just wear headphones with a click track playing for the first track I lay down.

I'm not down with recording drums after guitar... I would have your drummer record everything first with a click track (good headphones so it's loud) and then just do everything over the drums.
#6
The idea of a scratch track is this....

Often times, we orient ourselves within a song based on lyrical cues, so that you know that four bars after the end of the first verse, for instance, is after a certain lyric - not after you've counted 24 bars after the beginning of the intro, and having to remember something like "4 bars, then fill, then 8 bars then fill, then 4 more bars, a quick stop with a quick punch on the snare, and then four bars into the chorus."

So, with a scratch track, you lay down a vocal and guitar as a reference for the drummer to follow. That track is not kept. It simply serves (if done with a click) as a metronome with both harmonic and lyrical cues to help keep the drummer oriented within the song. Once the drums are laid down, (and the bass player might use the scratch track to orient him/herself within the song too), that track is nuked, and replaced by a 'keeper' vocal and a 'keeper' guitar part.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
So you guys are suggesting to only use the click track when recording the scratch track? Also, I am listening to the click track through my headphones and I made sure the mic won't pick it up but I am still hearing it faintly when using it to record other tracks after the first one during playbacks, if that makes sense. Maybe I should just use the click track once for the first track I record and leave it out of all subsequent tracks to fix the problem?

Again, thanks for the help guys.
"My strength is my determination" - Randy Rhoads (1956-1982)

Quote by LedZeppelin
Life is not an isolated moment, so don't live it as such.

Quote by bendystraw
art rock? isn't all rock art?
#8
I'd personally keep the click on with the scratch track, but if you're having those issues... i dunno...

Are your speakers also on while you are recording with the headphones, but you just don't notice it because... well... you've got headphones on? That's happened to me before.

Can you post a clip?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.