#1
say i buy a guitar, no frets buzz and i take proper care of it yet one day, one starts to buzz. what could be the cause of it? i cant figure it out, my electric has fret buzz occasionally but i take perfect care of it.
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#2
did you change string gauge? or if you've had it long enough maybe a fret has worn down a bit, causing the fret above it to hit the string?
JacK!
#3
Hmm, I had the same problems, but most common is that you lowered your tuning a bit, with "thin" strings that probably don't support it, and because of that, string is more loose and hits the frets. Another reason might be that you bought too "thin" strings and yet, they don't support your tuning, or just the strings wore down and need to be replaced
#4
The guitar is made of wood you know. In the wrong enviorment the wood may change and that causes buzz.
#5
is the action too low??

if the strings are touching the fret on its own look for the hole were u can fix it
#6
Check your strings out. You may need to replace them.
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#7
Quote by Fluffwig
The guitar is made of wood you know. In the wrong enviorment the wood may change and that causes buzz.


so whats the best conditions for wood.

say alder body, with maple neck and rosewood fingerbaord
#8
Quote by 2mins2midnite
so whats the best conditions for wood.

say alder body, with maple neck and rosewood fingerbaord


You'll get a thousand answers, but the best way to treat wood is kindly, meaning don't let it get to extremes in temperature, humidity, or physical abuse. For buzzing, guitars need tuneups from time to time and any somewhat talented guitar tech (or even just an experienced player) will tell you what's causing the problem. There are a whoooole bunch of issues that can cause it.

And just as a heads up, virtually no acoustic guitars have alder bodies.
#9
75 degree rooms with 40-50% humidity i believe is the best way... (as most guitars are made in that environment and most guitar stores keep that environment).
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#10
There's a number of possible causes. Your bridge could be maladjusted, you could have worn frets, or (worst case) your neck has warped.
Quote by BeefWellington

what's the point in being "philiosophical"?

Interesting question...
#11
my old guitar had the frett buzz so i got real mad and just filed down the fretts and raised the bridge then played it. and the buzz was gone! dont know which one worked but it did
Last edited by Brennon at Dec 24, 2008,
#12
There's way too many possible causes.

1. low humidity
2. worn frets
3. warped neck
4. string gauge is too light
5. neck bow is too straight
6. missing saddle(sound stupid, but it happens)
7. grooves in the saddle making the string height too low
8. nut grooves are too low

I'm sure there are probably more that I can't think of at the moment, or don't even know about. However, this is just a list of things that can potentially happen.

Some of them are rather rare occurrences though. For example, frets take a considerable amount of time to wear down until a fret dressing or replacement is needed, and necks don't warp as often as people think. Low nut? Doesn't happen often.

The more common reasons are low humidity, light string gauge, and straight neck bow.
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