#1
Hello hello, so i'm new, just made myself an account and have my 1st question,

I've got a line 6 flextone III XL here at my home in Canada. I love the amp. my problem is i am currently justing home here in canada for the holidays as i live in norway. my question is i was thinking of maybe bringing my amp back to norway with me, but the problem is the power issues. Has anyone ever brought equipment over to europe? will a power converter do the trick or will that lower the quality of the sound? any help is awesome! thanks ahead.
#2
I can't think of any reason it would affect the sound, a plug adapter would do the trick fine, but be sure to check that the voltages are the same
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#3
the voltage is different, thats why i would need a power converter not just an adapter... it would be going from 120v to 230v/240v. The amp can take 120v so i could use a converter to transform the power from 230/240 to 120 so the amp would accept it. i just dont know how safe it is for the amp or if it will destroy any sound quality.
#4
It shouldn't mess up any sound quality if you get a decent adapter. A friend of mine brought his Spider III over and it didn't do anything as far as quality, it's just a pain having a different plug. :P
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#5
A converter is essentially a transformer, same as the one that is in the amp right now so no, it will absolutely have no effect on "tone." The only thing you must watch out for is its rated power output, which must at least match or exceed the power consumption of the amp, or you will smoke it. Power consumption of the amp is typically higher than its sound power output, due to losses. Cheapo $5 need not apply.
#6
Quote by KingStill
A converter is essentially a transformer, same as the one that is in the amp right now so no, it will absolutely have no effect on "tone." The only thing you must watch out for is its rated power output, which must at least match or exceed the power consumption of the amp, or you will smoke it. Power consumption of the amp is typically higher than its sound power output, due to losses. Cheapo $5 need not apply.


well the listed output is 150 watts... what exactly do you mean with it must exceed the consumption of the amp?
#7
If your converter doesn't safely exceed the rate at which your amp consumes energy, it will overheat and fail, jolting your amp and blowing a fuse, or worse. At 150W sound output, that is one big baby, and on the back sticker it should say how much power it needs. If it doesn't, I would stay on the safe side and use something rated at 250W or more, which should run you about $80.

[edit] Assuming you dime the volume.
Last edited by KingStill at Dec 22, 2008,
#8
ok so on the back of the amp it is listed under the power requirements:

120v
50 - 60hz
250w max.

so should a 250w or more should work or go even bigger?
#9
Quote by Eternity Is Now
ok so on the back of the amp it is listed under the power requirements:

120v
50 - 60hz
250w max.

so should a 250w or more should work or go even bigger?

Ignore KingStill, the wattage is irrelevant.

The only thing that matters is the VOLTAGE, and you already have that covered.
Actually called Mark!

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#10
Quote by steven seagull
Ignore KingStill, the wattage is irrelevant.

The only thing that matters is the VOLTAGE, and you already have that covered.



well is still make a difference for what kind of transformer you can get... for instance my amp its 250w max output, so a 300w transformer would work, where as a 150w one wouldn't. so then a simple voltage transformer of 234/240 to 120 should do the trick?

such as this:

http://www.voltageconverters.com/itemdesc.asp?ic=VC300W
Last edited by Eternity Is Now at Dec 22, 2008,
#11
Quote by Eternity Is Now
thats what i thought as long as the power going into amp is correct, whether is be 120 or 230/240, the output should matter... so then a simple voltage transformer of 234/240 to 120 should do the trick?

Actually I got that wrong so don't ignore KingStill...

This should do the trick

http://www.voltageconverters.com/itemdesc.asp?ic=VC300W
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#12
haha i just edited mine after i realized what we were saying, but looks like we both found the same thing
#13
Quote by Eternity Is Now
well is still make a difference for what kind of transformer you can get... for instance my amp its 250w max output, so a 300w transformer would work, where as a 150w one wouldn't. so then a simple voltage transformer of 234/240 to 120 should do the trick?

such as this:

http://www.voltageconverters.com/itemdesc.asp?ic=VC300W


Correct, for a 250W input you would need a 300W (for some headroom safety) 220 to 110V stepdown transformer.
#14
Quote by KingStill
Correct, for a 250W input you would need a 300W (for some headroom safety) 220 to 110V stepdown transformer.

I agree...

...sorry KingStill.
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#16
Quote by steven seagull
Ignore KingStill, the wattage is irrelevant.

The only thing that matters is the VOLTAGE, and you already have that covered.


Ignore this guy

The laws of physics mean heat will be dissapated by the transformer. You ever wondered why mains cord (240V/120V) is thicker than the cord used for low voltage (batteries) applications? The thicker cable has less resistance so makes less heat. Lightbulbs work because of this and they use extremely thin cables which get very how and emit light. I assume this is not what you want your amp to do.
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