#1
I'm looking for specific jazz standards that use this progression.

Examples?

Thanks!
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#2
Literally just about every tune. I'm serious on that one.
Some tunes that are pretty much just 2-5-1's are Tune Up, Pent Up House, and Perdido.
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#3
Quote by Punk Poser
Literally just about every tune. I'm serious on that one.
Some tunes that are pretty much just 2-5-1's are Tune Up, Pent Up House, and Perdido.


Yup. It's kind of rare that you find a tune that doesn't have any ii-V-Is in it.

Tune Up is a really good suggestion for something to work on. If you learn it in several keys, you'll be working out all your ii-Vs in all the keys. Plus it's a great tune, simple and fun to play, and it sounds great with a good group.

Any Charlie Parker tune will be full of ii-Vs, too. Confirmation, Ornithology, Anthropology, Donna Lee, great tunes. And great practice, too, especially if you learn the heads.
#4
just start with autumn leaves the whole thing is ii-V-I with the exception of 1 tri-tone sub chord in the bridge.
Originally posted by arrrgg
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#5
No, not just about every song is ii-V-I. You don't know what you're talking about, not every song is the same progresssion.
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#6
Quote by srvflood
No, not just about every song is ii-V-I. You don't know what you're talking about, not every song is the same progresssion.


I'm afraid you are the one who doesn't know what he is talking about. I never said that a song is exclusively ii-V-I, and there is no good reason for you to think I would be implying that. I merely said that ii-V-I's are in soooo many jazz tunes. Don't believe me, go look in a real book and than say I don't know what I'm talking about.
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#7
I agree among jazz "standards" the ii-V-I is super common. Among standards that is..
Originally posted by arrrgg
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#9
Quote by srvflood
No, not just about every song is ii-V-I. You don't know what you're talking about, not every song is the same progresssion.


Almost every JAZZ tune. I thought the genre was implied, considering the thread. If you still don't agree, explain, please, I'm curious.
#10
Quote by srvflood
No, not just about every song is ii-V-I. You don't know what you're talking about, not every song is the same progresssion.

I know it's already been said, but I'll just add that they didn't say every song is based over it. However, it is an extremely common resolving progression, and it IS found in a massive majority of jazz tunes. Whether it be swing, all the variations of bop, or cool jazz, it is found in a LOT of tunes. Not really so much in modal or fusion, but yeah you get the idea.
On topic, St. Thomas is a real easy standard to learn, and most of the phrases end on a ii-V-I progression. Also, It Don't Mean A Thing features the progression a few times.
Of course, there is a TONNE of material that I could list, but those are two very well known standards, so you should have no trouble checking them out.
EDIT: Also Check Out Perdido, another great standard.
Chick Corea's Spain is also heavily based on ii-V-I's, but is a more fusion-based example. Also one of my all-time favourites to solo over.




Last edited by pangui at Dec 28, 2008,
#11
a great song that helped me learn to solo over ii V Is was Satin Doll. it a great, fun song, and its actually pretty easy to play the head. and, to improv over a ii V I, do dorian mode.
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