#1
The idea is that this is a prologue to a small novel or novella. I tried to write it in the voice of a direct descendant of Capt. Caulfield Whitewater, who is writing a historical essay for an English class (and she is very biased, which made this fun to write). And for whatever reason, the teacher of the English class is named Riesling, after one of the characters. I haven't finished the "essay", but think its kind of cool so far. And you should read it and tell me what you think.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Caulfield Whitewater
An Essay

Becky Whitewater
English 200 - Ms. Riesling


The year was 1861, and the United States was on the verge of a violent and bloody civil war. Southern "men", if it is appropriate to label them so, had begun their succession from the Union, and our greatest of all great men, President Abraham Lincoln, called for 75,000 volunteers to help thwart off the southern dogs. The great state of Indiana, forever and loyally committed to the undoubtedly powerful United States Union, was the first state to answer President Lincolns call to arms. Among the many and willing young soldiers who willfully dedicated their lives and service to the Union for all of eternity, was a young man only 19 years of age. His name, Caulfield Whitewater, will forever be remembered and saluted by Americans and Indianans alike for his service to the holy United States Union during the Great American Civil War.
Caulfield Whitewater was born the son of a blacksmith in 1842 alongside the Ohio River in Rising Sun, Indiana. There he lived until previously mentioned, when in 1861 he strode alongside the great President Lincoln to defend his home and his country.
Within a month of joining the service Whitewater was promoted to Sergeant of Indie Company, a small Company of volunteers from Southern Indiana. Indie Company later formed a smaller portion of the 119th Regiment, better known as the Thunderous Thousand for their selfless actions at the Battle of Gettysburg. Corporal James Feeley, an officer in Indie Co., would later remark in his personal journal about the bravery and courage of the still 20 year old Sgt. Whitewater...

"In the heat of battle, when other men cowered behind their muzzles and screamed for their mothers, only one man, only one man had the power, the strength, the unmatched fortitude to raise his head above the trench, gather his men, and sweep the plains clean of the southern infidels..."
- Corp. James Feeley

~~~


In June of 1863 the Captain of Indie Company and his 1st and 2nd Lieutenants were killed by renegade Southern soldiers in the town of Gettysburg, on the eve of the great battle. After the murders, deliberations took place immediately to place a new Captain in charge of Indie Co. As the highest ranking official, Sgt. Whitewater was next in line to inherit the position, however, two newly appointed Corporals claimed Sgt. Whitewater did not possess proper training and knowledge to lead Indie Co. So on the last day of June, 1863, Sgt. Whitewater gathered Indie. Co. for a meeting.
During that meeting he gave a rousing speech where he spoke of mortality, brotherhood, and of sacrificing ones self for the Union. His brothers in arms were riveted and he was unanimously appointed the new Captain of Indie Co. As the new Captain of Indie Co. he immediately called the two Corporals who protested his appointment. That night in Gettysburg, in the hay loft of a local farmer and in front of Indie Co., the two mutineers were placed against a wall and executed.

~~~


Two months later, in September of 1863, Capt. Whitewater led Indie company into the Battle of Chickamauga. Indie Co. bravely held their ground for three days, although being greatly outnumbered by Confederate soldiers. Late in the day on the 20th of September, as the sun set upon the bloodied waters of West Chickamauga Creek, Capt. Whitewater watched as many of his Union brothers retreated into the woods, as it was certain the Confederates had won the battle. Disgusted by this lack of fortitude Capt. Whitewater ordered his men to surge on, and be immortalized with him as heroes.
Like the rust which plagues a rifle left in the rain, knowledge to has a way of deteriorating. As of today, no written history of their final surge has survived the test of time. Capt. Whitewater and his two closest officers, Sgt. Jonathon Riesling, and Sgt. Martin Smith (the three men were the only survivors of the surge) took with them the only unbiased*record of the surge.
Capt. Whitewater and his two Sergeants were captured by Confederate soldiers, resisted their arrest**, and were promptly beaten and dragged alongside a Confederate regiment for a ten day journey to Camp Sumter (also referred to as Andersonville Prison), where the three soldiers resided for 3 months. To best describe the conditions present at Camp Sumter, I will include an excerpt from a statement made by Capt. Whitewater...

"When we first arrived at Andersonville we weren't sure what to expect because we hadn't eaten or drunk anything except moldy cornmeal and river water since we'd been captured, our assumption was that almost anything would be an improvement upon our current conditions. My naivety still surprises me to this day. And why shouldn't I have been? I was a young man, and hopelessly optimistic, especially for my men, for whom I cared much for. Our situations, however, did not improve from whence we came; they instead worsened hastily each day. This reflected poorly upon my good friend Martin Smith, who died a mere week from after arrival from malnourishment, and subsequent disentary. My only man left from Indie was Sgt. Riesling, and we agreed a swift and marvelous escape was in order."
- Capt. Caulfield Whitewater



*Several Confederate scholars have documented what they consider to be the "true" history of the surge. Because of their reluctance to acknowledge the heroism of Capt. Whitewater, said histories will not be referred to in this text.

**This event, and its subsequent consequences, is properly documented by both parties involved.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"I saw a werewolf drinking a piña colada at Trader Vic's...his hair was perfect."
#3
Oh yeah...almost forgot the best part
"any likenesses to actual people and events is by coincidence only"
"I saw a werewolf drinking a piña colada at Trader Vic's...his hair was perfect."
#4
I just read the first two paragraphs and I mean no offense but it sounds like it's full of shit.
#5
Quote by Trefellin
I just read the first two paragraphs and I mean no offense but it sounds like it's full of shit.


+1
Quote by AAAAAAAAAARGH
You're a better man than me.
#7
thanks, if i didn't want a straight answer i would have asked my mother
"I saw a werewolf drinking a piña colada at Trader Vic's...his hair was perfect."
#8
Is a 'novella' like a female novel? That word always confused me.

Quote by FloodingInTexas
thanks, if i didn't want a straight answer i would have asked my mother


Nice.
#9
I liked it. Was it great? No. But I liked it.
I like to write, and support Chemistry For Improved Life.

Please, recommend me any bands or artists of any genre or medium. Paintings, poets, writers, books, paintings, songs, musicians.

Anything, anything at all. Please.
#10
Quote by aaciseric
Is a 'novella' like a female ? That word always confused me.

novel=smaller novel

Animal Farm, for example, is a novella.
I like to write, and support Chemistry For Improved Life.

Please, recommend me any bands or artists of any genre or medium. Paintings, poets, writers, books, paintings, songs, musicians.

Anything, anything at all. Please.
#11
Quote by FloodingInTexas
Captain Caulfield Whitewater

change the name, people who hated Catcher in The Rye (like me) will not want to read it.
grok it.

SKREAM!

Listen to jazz, it's good for you...
#12
Quote by dubstar92
change the name, people who hated Catcher in The Rye (like me) will not want to read it.


It had a similar effect on me.

It's not a terrible bit of writing but it's a boring cowboy riding the biased bull...

Yes, that does make sense, think about it.
#13
Catcher in the Rye was sitting on my desk when I wrote it...Caulfield's a nice name

And I acknowledge that its "full of ****", because it's fake
i think the bias is the only thing that makes it interesting
"I saw a werewolf drinking a piña colada at Trader Vic's...his hair was perfect."
#14
Also, this...

"only one man, only one man had the power"

That just sounds like the chorus to a power metal song. What do you mean power? It makes him sound like a Power Ranger. If it's fiction, why don't you write about what would've happened if the South had Power Rangers on their side but the Union had the Ninja Turtles?
#15
Quote by Trefellin
Also, this...

"only one man, only one man had the power"

That just sounds like the chorus to a power metal song. What do you mean power? It makes him sound like a Power Ranger. If it's fiction, why don't you write about what would've happened if the South had Power Rangers on their side but the Union had the Ninja Turtles?


because that's ridiculous, haha. but it's hilarious, thanks for the tip
"I saw a werewolf drinking a piña colada at Trader Vic's...his hair was perfect."