#1
I've never owned a real vocal microphone before. I've only had the cheap, crappy computer microphones that can be plugged straight into the computer. I'm looking for a good vocal microphone between $100 and $200, but I'm really not sure what to get and I don't know what kind of stuff I need to connect a vocal microphone to my computer.
These are my questions:

What microphone should I get?
What do I need to connect a vocal microphone to my computer?
#2
You should just get a beta shure sm. Then you can use it for amps, live vocals, or recording vocals.
#3
Quote by Nike-Man
You should just get a beta shure sm. Then you can use it for amps, live vocals, or recording vocals.


I've heard that Shures change the voice, though. I want to hear myself as I actually sound. I already have a bit of an idea as to what microphone I want to get, I'm just looking for suggestions because I have no experience with them. My second question is actually the one I'm more concerned about.
#4
Well if you get a condensor, your going to have to get an interface. So 200 is going to get you a sh*tty mic and interface. What software are you running
#5
Quote by Nike-Man
Well if you get a condensor, your going to have to get an interface. So 200 is going to get you a sh*tty mic and interface. What software are you running


A free program called Kristal. If I need to, I can get Cubase from my neighbor. He's offered to give me a copy of it before.
#6
Mics such as the Shure SM57 and Studio Projects B1 are both great but you will need to run them into an audio interface to get the sound to your computer as you cant run these mics to your mic port...

The interface will cost you around $150 to start...mics generally start at $100
Last edited by moody07747 at Dec 23, 2008,
#7
All mics (pretty much) change your voice somewhat. Just look at the frequency response curves of any mic. You see little hills and valleys. In other words.... it doesn't capture all of the source frequencies equally. And then there is the physics of how mics work - things like proximity effect where the closer the source is to the mic, the more the lower frequencies are accentuated. Nearly all mics are succeptable to this, though larger diaphragm mics more so than smaller diaphragm mics.

The trick is finding a mic that changes it in the most flattering ways.

There are lots of great vocal mics out there, and some decent ones in your price range. (interface notwithstanding....)

The Shure SM57/58 are good workhorse mics that are rugged enough for live use too without having any worries. They'd never be my first choice for recording vox, but they'll do okay.

For condensors, consider the Rode NT1, the Studio Projects series, the Marshal MXL series, etc. Behringer mics are decent for the price too. Don't be thrown by the rhetoric until you've actually used or at least heard one used properly. I'd say that 90%+ of it is just people spouting off because they have bought into the rhetoric of others, so it spreads like a cancer. Generally, take the price of a Behringer mic and multiply it by about 2.5 to get the price range of another brand's mic that will be appreciably better. Sure, the Studio Projects and MXL mics are only about 50% to 100% more than the Behringers, and they will generally be a *bit* better, but in order to get appreciably better, you're going to pay a lot more. The Rode mics are a good example. Start with a $100 Behringer mic, and you've got to go up to about $250 for the Rode mic that will be that noticeable step up.

Interestingly, the mic with the flattest frequency response curve under about $1000 is the Behringer ECM8000. It is a small diaphragm condensor, and costs about $45 USD. It is labeled as a measurement mic (though I have had good success with it on acoustic guitar and as drum overheads). Because it is a small diaphragm, it is not much prone to proximity effect. Strangely enough, I tried it on vocals, and it was entirely unremarkable.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.