#1
Hey whats up!


anyways, today i notcid that my amp sounded like crap when ever i played more then 2 strings (I have a traynor 10W lil amp). An example is playing both the B and high E string on the 9th fret. You can hear both sounds vibrating (actually) and makes you want to chop your ears off. So is there a way to fix it? or just get a new amp (everuone has always been saying to stay with this one because ive only been playing 5 months)
#2
first things first: are you in tune?
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#3
Quote by Blompcube
first things first: are you in tune?

That's a good question, on top of that, what chords are you playing?
#4
Intonation problem maybe?
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#5
check your guitar on another amp
might be the guitar
Pull my finger

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#6
to the first two: yes it is in tune, i tuned it and then tried it again, and yes intonation is right. I was playing the 2nd verse of Foo Fighters: the pretender, but it is much worse when i play a d maj chord, as there are 4 strings.
#7
Quote by adlix
to the first two: yes it is in tune, i tuned it and then tried it again, and yes intonation is right. I was playing the 2nd verse of Foo Fighters: the pretender, but it is much worse when i play a d maj chord, as there are 4 strings.

I'm going to go out on a limb, your gain is probably set too high, and I bet you need to tweek your EQ...too much treble can make playing rhythm sound really harsh. If it's not one or both of those, then I guess I can't help...
#8
Perhabs your action is too low? The string hits the fretboard and creats some kind of buzz?
#9
(Almost) any chord that isn't a 5th or a suspended 4th will sound dissonate with a lot of distortion. Distortion adds harmonics to the sound, making it sound 'thicker', but they don't get along well with anything but a perfect interval (4th, 5th, octave, unison). Having only the root and the 4th (barring two strings at one fret, other then the G and the B), will sound dissonate with too much distortion, because a 4th, while being 'perfect', isn't as perfect as a 5th.
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#11
Quote by david_highland
I'm going to go out on a limb, your gain is probably set too high, and I bet you need to tweek your EQ...too much treble can make playing rhythm sound really harsh. If it's not one or both of those, then I guess I can't help...

will try that tomorrow
#12
I think High Gain + (3-note) Chords = weird distorted sounds :P

edit: what theacousticpunk said
I must stop wasting time in The Pit and practice!
#13
I'd say if you have only been playing for 5 months and it REALLY annoys you - get a micro cube. It's an amp that sounds nice, and is really good for practicing. Even if/when you get a new amp it is still awesome as a practice amp.

Everything else has been said. So do that first, and if that doesn't work then the cube is a good investment!
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#14
i thinks its your action
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#15
As somebody above said, when you add distortion, some notes dont go well together like they would on a clean sound.