#1
Anyone got any simple tips with learning scales, ive learnt how to play along to Emaj, then i tried to play along to Gmaj and the scale seemed almost identical, Cmaj was completely different (as you tell iam a noob)
I just want to learn them buy ear (no theory), so if anyone could give me any tips to understand it better i would be most grateful.

thanks
#2
E maj has 3 extra sharps besides the F# actually.
I'd practice them by playing a melody over a backing chord (use guitar pro or recording device or whatever) soon or late you'll find out that the notes of that melody are in the scale. Because they just 'sound good'.
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Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#3
Not so much a theoretical tip as a practical one, you should always try and utilize all 4 fingers.. in specific shapes etc, too many people focus on Index/Middle/Ring.. And by the time you realise "Crap.. I need my pinky" you're like.. 2 years down the line, and you've gotta spend ages catching back up...

But yeah, USE THE PINKY!!
#4
Quote by skilly1
Anyone got any simple tips with learning scales, ive learnt how to play along to Emaj, then i tried to play along to Gmaj and the scale seemed almost identical, Cmaj was completely different (as you tell iam a noob)
I just want to learn them buy ear (no theory), so if anyone could give me any tips to understand it better i would be most grateful.

thanks

All major scales ARE exactly the same - they have the same pattern of intervals and therefore make the same shapes on the fretboard, just transposed depending on the key.

Make a point of learning the scale itself, as in the notes it contains and it's pattern of intervals - don't just learn patterns. Also use your ears, make a point of learning the sound of the scale and the individual intervals.
Actually called Mark!

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#5
ive just started to use my pinky and its building up strength, i have been practicing with backing music but mainly just with the Emaj scale,
i need to know other scales now, seems a lot to take in but i'll just keep practicing, i was maybe thinking of buying a dvd on scales so i could watch and it and learn that way.
#6
You don't need to learn any more scales yet, there's a hell of a lot to absorb just on the major scale and it's the cornerstone of western music theory.

A DVD isn't going to be much use, there's nothing physical or visual to be conveyed - scales are all about the notes they contain and the context they can be used in.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#8
i am playing along to a backing track in Emaj, but the only notes i am playing in my solo are EADGBE and not in any particular order.
My question is: it sounds good to me but from what ive read and understand its not a scale, is this ok or right to do?
#9
That IS a scale - it's E minor pentatonic. In rock and blues music using a minor pentatonic over a major key is pretty common, that's why it sounds good...because you're used to hearing it.
Actually called Mark!

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People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#10
thanks Mark, your advice is much appreciated, as you can tell iam new to scales, just wanna know - are there any to rules to how you play the scale, i mean it doesnt have to played in any particular order does it, or in some cases maybe?
#11
Quote by skilly1
i am playing along to a backing track in Emaj, but the only notes i am playing in my solo are EADGBE and not in any particular order.
My question is: it sounds good to me but from what ive read and understand its not a scale, is this ok or right to do?


Open string solo FTW

There are 5 shapes of the major scale, learn all of them. Then stop thinking of 5 shapes but 1 web of notes which you can freely move around. This pattern covers the entire neck and therefore works in every key by shifting the frets, etc.
#12
Quote by Roast Beef
Open string solo FTW


lol, thats what i thought when i looked at my guitar fingerboard chart and realized i was just playing all the open strings in my solo, i must have them tapped into my mind from tuning my guitar in.

i was just playing a solo to a Cmaj backing track and i was using a Bb note in the scale which isnt in the Cmaj scale , seemed liked the best note i hit as well.
#13
Quote by skilly1
thanks Mark, your advice is much appreciated, as you can tell iam new to scales, just wanna know - are there any to rules to how you play the scale, i mean it doesnt have to played in any particular order does it, or in some cases maybe?

oh ffs
I wrote a massive reply and my browser crashed...I'll do it again when I get home.
Actually called Mark!

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People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#14
Quote by skilly1
lol, thats what i thought when i looked at my guitar fingerboard chart and realized i was just playing all the open strings in my solo, i must have them tapped into my mind from tuning my guitar in.

i was just playing a solo to a Cmaj backing track and i was using a Bb note in the scale which isnt in the Cmaj scale , seemed liked the best note i hit as well.


If you play it as a passing note it can sound good, but a plain 'Cmaj' descriptor isn't enough context to say that with any authority. What mood + chords?
#16
I just want to learn them buy ear (no theory)


Tonal harmony is theory. Do you want to learn theory, or don't you? Make up your mind.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#17
Quote by Archeo Avis
Tonal harmony is theory. Do you want to learn theory, or don't you? Make up your mind.



No its not. Music theory is a field of study. Part of what can be studied is Tonal Harmony.....


TS:
You'll better understand how to apply scales, and gain a better understanding in general if you take the time to engage in the field of study called music theory. You certainly can use your ears and learn the shapes on the guitar, but I wouldn't necessarily avoid learning theory.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jan 9, 2009,
#18
No its not. Music theory is a field of study. Part of what can be studied is Tonal Harmony.....


A theory is a unified set of principles used to explain or describe a phenomenon, and music theory is no exception. His post is like asking someone to teach him VSEPR without making him learn chemistry.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#19
Quote by Archeo Avis
A theory is a unified set of principles used to explain or describe a phenomenon, and music theory is no exception. His post is like asking someone to teach him VSEPR without making him learn chemistry.



Music theory is a field of study.

Utilizing tonal harmony doesn't necessarily imply being involved in the study of it.

What you said implied that by learning music by ear that he was learning theory anyway. Thats were I disagree. He may gain his own personal understanding but he would not be gaining the unified set of principles that have been developed through the field of study called music theory. (though he may ultimately come up with some of the same conclusions)


Quote by Archeo Avis

His post is like asking someone to teach him VSEPR without making him learn chemistry.



I agree here
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jan 9, 2009,
#20
Quote by skilly1
ive just started to use my pinky and its building up strength, i have been practicing with backing music but mainly just with the Emaj scale,
i need to know other scales now, seems a lot to take in but i'll just keep practicing, i was maybe thinking of buying a dvd on scales so i could watch and it and learn that way.
Lightning Hopkins was one of the most prolific blues guitarists recording a phenomenal number of albums. The Houston Chronicle listed him amongst the 100 texans who influenced the world, and Rolling Stone have him ranked at 71 in the top 100 guitar players of all time.

Mance Lipscomb, a Texas bluesman of an earlier generation, once described Lightnin' as an "E man." "E and a little A." Lipscomb said, noting that these were the only chords Hopkins tried to play. "He can play E chord good as he want to. And Everything he going to play that have any kind of sense to it he going to play in E. And maybe sometime in A."

Perhaps Llipscombe was oversimplifying, but Lightnin' did record hundreds of songs in E and A, playing them in standard tuning with bare thumb and fingers, or sometimes with a thumbpick and fingers. Whether performing on acoustic or electric, playing slow, medium or fast, Lightnin Hopkins could cover the guitar neck from top to bottom in the key of E as well as any man alive. ~GuitarWorld Magazine July 2000


My point? - Of course it's good to know all the scales in all positions but learning one really really well is better than knowing a whole bunch "kinda alright". You can build an entire carreer predominantly using just one scale. (a more modern example often thrown around is Metallica in Em).

Also once you learn the scale pattern over the fretboard for one major scale the next one's easy cause you notice the patterns just shift along the fretboard while retaining the same shape. The key difference in playing a the scale in different keys (and reason E seems to be so appealing to guitarists) is to do with the open strings available for use in a particular key.
Si